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Condensation Build Up Inside Hour Meter???

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Hey everyone.........I have been looking through the hour meter threads and posts for a couple of hours now, and can't find what I'm looking for, so any help or suggestions would be great.

I am on my second HardLine meter since June 2007. My first one lasted a good 3 and a half or almost four years I should say.

As some of you may know, this past June is when I did a documented top and bottom end rebuild on TT.

Again, thanks to all involved in that thread!

O.K. on to my question.........

My garage is now heated, where as before, it wasn't the first three and a half years I owned my bike. It is now just starting to get wintery here.

I mainly work on my bike in the basement; but store the bike in the garage for fire preventative measures. Plus the insurance I have on the house, explicitly states that anything with a fuel tank must be stored in the garage - makes sense to me, since that is how I always did it for safety reasons when the garage is attached to the home.

Just yesterday - for the first time this year - it was about 38° and I was about an hour into riding when my service oil reminder kicked on the blinking screen alert message. So I pulled into the garage (because I was riding at home) and serviced my bike for the healthy new oil drink it deserved. The bike was sitting in the warm garage for about roughly ten minutes while I changed the oil, and that is when I noticed something funny about the meter acting strangely.

The screen started to fade in and out as if condensation sweat was building up on the electronic board inside the meter. I looked at the meter today, and the screen is not fading in and out - I thought for sure, that if it were condensation causing this, that I would have seen it on the glass screen :) and :lol:

Did condensation build up cause that because of extreme rapid temperature change, and if so, how many times can that happen before I can expect total failure of the board inside it?

Also, what is the coldest temperatures the meter can withstand?

I've had my first one work flawlessly in 22° weather - just never put it back in a heated garage after riding it.

I've had the second meter since June; but like I stated, it is just now getting colder here. I also shot an email or two HardLines way, but haven't heard back from them yet and you guys are usually faster for the right answers.

Thanks.

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I have a el cheapo 9 dollar one off ebay, and my garage is only heated when i am out there, also my bike gets ridden on the ice. I have never had a problem with any of them that i have had.

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I have a el cheapo 9 dollar one off ebay, and my garage is only heated when i am out there, also my bike gets ridden on the ice. I have never had a problem with any of them that i have had.

I apologize, I didn't mean to ignore your post.

That is good to hear the el cheapo ones work great, and I may consider one of those for cold weather riding, if it turns out that my meter is failing from condensation build-up.

Wouldn't that be funny if el cheapo was the name of them.

Could just be the battery too.

That was one of the emails I shot them in regards to. I asked them how long I can expect the battery to last if the darn thing was sitting in a warehouse already on for a couple years. When I got it, it was already on.

They need to make them so that they can recharge themselves by a trickle charge circuit or something.

Edited by nokickstandsallowed
Recognition.

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That was one of the emails I shot them in regards to. I asked them how long I can expect the battery to last if the darn thing was sitting in a warehouse already on for a couple years. When I got it, it was already on.

They need to make them so that they can recharge themselves by a trickle charge circuit or something.

Something like that I'd expect to last about as long as a digital wristwatch... ~5 years. Adding a charging circuit adds components... components add cost... when you're making a $2.50 device you sell for $10, a few cents worth of components adds up to tens of thousands of dollars when you start mass-producing the product. (We recently found a different supplier of a part at work... 48 cents cheaper than we were getting them before. That supplier change made >$100,000 difference on the order. Pure profit to us.)

Just pry the thing apart and see what kind of battery is in there... go to the grocery store and pick up a new one to throw in there. Smear some RTV around the case afterwards if you're concerned about water ingress.

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Just pry the thing apart and see what kind of battery is in there... go to the grocery store and pick up a new one to throw in there. Smear some RTV around the case afterwards if you're concerned about water ingress.

Interesting. I did not know that those could be pried apart to access the battery. Mine does not have a split seam in the middle of the unit, it has a sealed gel type backing that seems if once removed, is futile to try and reassemble.

It is clever how they have the high priced ones almost impervious to successful dis-assembly by ensuring that you break it before you can service it; of course I think that they put as much innovation and R&D into making sure you can't service it for the sole purpose to ensure that it is more convenient to just buy another one instead of the hassle it is to replace something as simple as a battery in them.

Personally, I think they would sell a lot more units if they ensured the customer that battery replacement for them was easier than the actual installation of the unit. Sure, in the long run, it would cost more to make them serviceable; however, once people found out they could replace a battery in them without headaches, I think more would buy them regardless of price at first and then the company could gradually bring the price down.

Another point I made a long time ago on TT: We are very lucky they did not incorporate that type of thinking into servicing our engines because if they found a way to seal our engine cases so that it was such a risk to pull them apart and could only be done with a machining process, a lot less people would want something they couldn't service on their own.

Edited by nokickstandsallowed
Spacing problem

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ah, yours is potted in. Yeah, good luck getting that stuff out. If it's rubbery, sometimes you can pry out little chunks (Needlenose pliers work well)... the harder stuff will chip and break pieces off the board before it comes out.

Easy to manufacture potted parts, and it makes them impervious to corrosion... but like you've found out, they are not serviceable after potting.

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