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2011 TC449 - First Ride

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Bought it yesterday, rode it today.

Ride was all flat, soft stuff, some bermed turns, some packed damp sand, some loose dry sand.

The motor is outstanding. It does exactly what you ask it to. The chassis is interesting - where my old YZ426F would "swap" and bring the back end around under heavy gas or heavy brakes, the TC449 does neither - it keeps those wheels in line. Even when you break the rear loose on purpose, it just hangs out there, feeling rock steady.

It wants to push the front more, and longer than the YZ did (I think) - maybe that's just the price of incredible rear traction - the front fades in comparison. Maybe I just notice the front more because there is NOTHING to notice or think about with rear grip.

It's a quiet, stout motor. Really very fun.

In comparison to my 2000 YZ426F, it is taller, longer, and exactly 3 lbs heavier (I weighed them both with the bathroom scale/2x4 method last night). If it didn't have electric start, I couldn't ride it, I'm sure. My inseam is only 29 inches. I don't know how I'm going to manage race starts. Maybe they'll let me bring a little box to the grid...

Here's some mindless pictures and video from the event of its purchase and from the first day's ride.

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banda, enjoy the ride and welcome to the Husqvarna community.

Those TC449s make great woods racers!

Best kept secret out there. :lol:

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The rear end works fantastic off road too. Just like you said hooks up and does not get squirly. Enjoy finding the limits and pushing them. Weight really matters little as the bike works fantastic. Does is feel lighter? (I bet so)

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I've been riding the same MX bike for over 8 years - it's HARD to adjust. I had to sleep on it after the first ride before I realized: I like it. It has a lot of potential for a fun, fast machine that I can improve my skills on. Its looks grow on me more and more. I peek in my garage and think - "Damn, that's a crazy looking bike."

And it needs NOTHING... not a single additional thing for the riding I want to do on it. No pipe, no fuel controller, no flywheel weight, no suspension jiggering, no aftermarket bars, no gripper seat cover, no frame protectors...

And with the money I saved over a new Japanese bike, I can do the first three or four years of top end and bottom end service, and still come out ahead.

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I've been riding the same MX bike for over 8 years - it's HARD to adjust. I had to sleep on it after the first ride before I realized: I like it. It has a lot of potential for a fun, fast machine that I can improve my skills on. Its looks grow on me more and more. I peek in my garage and think - "Damn, that's a crazy looking bike."

And it needs NOTHING... not a single additional thing for the riding I want to do on it. No pipe, no fuel controller, no flywheel weight, no suspension jiggering, no aftermarket bars, no gripper seat cover, no frame protectors...

And with the money I saved over a new Japanese bike, I can do the first three or four years of top end and bottom end service, and still come out ahead.

Nice. And perfect outlook / real world thinking on the bike over the long term. :lol:

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I've been riding the same MX bike for over 8 years - it's HARD to adjust. I had to sleep on it after the first ride before I realized: I like it. It has a lot of potential for a fun, fast machine that I can improve my skills on. Its looks grow on me more and more. I peek in my garage and think - "Damn, that's a crazy looking bike."

And it needs NOTHING... not a single additional thing for the riding I want to do on it. No pipe, no fuel controller, no flywheel weight, no suspension jiggering, no aftermarket bars, no gripper seat cover, no frame protectors...

And with the money I saved over a new Japanese bike, I can do the first three or four years of top end and bottom end service, and still come out ahead.

What are the riding conditions you ride most? I have been on alightweight 2st MX bike forever and just wondering about the adaptability to the woods. I realize there is the TXC but its also $1000 more dollars for one tiny little gear. And deep in the recesses of my aged mind, I wonder about resale of this "bastard child" that has been tainted by everyone in the press. And the masses do pay attention right or wrong, hence the deep discounts. Help!

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I bought it for two kinds of riding:

  • TT Scrambles - WOT on hardpack, flat turns
  • Vet/Amateur MX - Soft rutted turns, low berms, hardpack tabletop type jumps

I think it's going to be great for both. I have a play bike for riding with my kids and for woods racing, so I don't think I'll ever even try to verify its suitability as a woods bike.

I keep my bikes for a long time (witness my 2000 YZ426F) so resale doesn't matter much to me - but I am surprised by the presumption that this new bike is somehow tainted by reviews... I haven't seen that at all. People and magazines that have ridden it have nothing but good stuff to say about its power and handling. It's NOT a BMW G450X, no matter what parts it shares. The BMW/Kymco motor, it turns out, is really good part of the bike. I have yet to hear anyone with experience disagree.

I think the discounts are BMW's legitimate stab at the chicken and the egg problem of the dirtbike market. Dirt riders are herd animals. They benefit from sameness. The more people there are riding the same bike as you, the more setup knowledge gets shared, and the more aftermarket support there is. BMW can't sell dirt bikes to Americans until Americans see Husqvarna as a actual player in the market. Husqvarna can't be a player in the market untill they sell some dirt bikes to Americans. The discounts aren't desperation (I don't think). They are an entry strategy. Just like with Mini, you can see the concept, you can see them on a showroom floor, but you can't see yourself in one until you see one on the road. I think BMW believes that dirt riders will see themselves on a Husqvarna when they see one at the track or on the trail.

In one day of riding, my Husky drew a crowd. People wanted to know about it. When they asked what I paid for it, I told them, and people were astonished. "That's what the Honda place wants for an '08!" was one comment I heard.

Also "That pipe looks exposed"... but that's another topic.

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I bought it for two kinds of riding:

  • TT Scrambles - WOT on hardpack, flat turns
  • Vet/Amateur MX - Soft rutted turns, low berms, hardpack tabletop type jumps

I think it's going to be great for both. I have a play bike for riding with my kids and for woods racing, so I don't think I'll ever even try to verify its suitability as a woods bike.

I keep my bikes for a long time (witness my 2000 YZ426F) so resale doesn't matter much to me - but I am surprised by the presumption that this new bike is somehow tainted by reviews... I haven't seen that at all. People and magazines that have ridden it have nothing but good stuff to say about its power and handling. It's NOT a BMW G450X, no matter what parts it shares. The BMW/Kymco motor, it turns out, is really good part of the bike. I have yet to hear anyone with experience disagree.

I think the discounts are BMW's legitimate stab at the chicken and the egg problem of the dirtbike market. Dirt riders are herd animals. They benefit from sameness. The more people there are riding the same bike as you, the more setup knowledge gets shared, and the more aftermarket support there is. BMW can't sell dirt bikes to Americans until Americans see Husqvarna as a actual player in the market. Husqvarna can't be a player in the market untill they sell some dirt bikes to Americans. The discounts aren't desperation (I don't think). They are an entry strategy. Just like with Mini, you can see the concept, you can see them on a showroom floor, but you can't see yourself in one until you see one on the road. I think BMW believes that dirt riders will see themselves on a Husqvarna when they see one at the track or on the trail.

In one day of riding, my Husky drew a crowd. People wanted to know about it. When they asked what I paid for it, I told them, and people were astonished. "That's what the Honda place wants for an '08!" was one comment I heard.

Also "That pipe looks exposed"... but that's another topic.

Understood. It can't help but be a positive thing to get more out in peoples hands. Some differ but I think it is the best looking bike on the market. Thanks for your info. :lol:

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Congrats on the new bike! I like the new look of Husky, but the only thing I wonder about is getting parts when you need them. I am concerned about my local KTM dealer presently too, but thank god for the internet!

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If it's any comfort, parts wise, I ordered some pieces from their performance catalog - it was all in stock in their US warehouse. The parts should be here less than a week after ordering them.

And I see that Wiseco will sell you three different sized pistons for a TC449, cheaper than a comparable unit for my 2000 YZ426 - less machining I suppose..

All signs are encouraging so far. (fingers crossed)

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If it's any comfort, parts wise, I ordered some pieces from their performance catalog - it was all in stock in their US warehouse. The parts should be here less than a week after ordering them.

And I see that Wiseco will sell you three different sized pistons for a TC449, cheaper than a comparable unit for my 2000 YZ426 - less machining I suppose..

All signs are encouraging so far. (fingers crossed)

Mine has been solid and there has been much talk of much improved parts stock and quick supply. They are trying. Husky NW seems very committed to making this solid.

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I bought it for two kinds of riding:

  • TT Scrambles - WOT on hardpack, flat turns
  • Vet/Amateur MX - Soft rutted turns, low berms, hardpack tabletop type jumps

I think it's going to be great for both. I have a play bike for riding with my kids and for woods racing, so I don't think I'll ever even try to verify its suitability as a woods bike.

I keep my bikes for a long time (witness my 2000 YZ426F) so resale doesn't matter much to me - but I am surprised by the presumption that this new bike is somehow tainted by reviews... I haven't seen that at all. People and magazines that have ridden it have nothing but good stuff to say about its power and handling. It's NOT a BMW G450X, no matter what parts it shares. The BMW/Kymco motor, it turns out, is really good part of the bike. I have yet to hear anyone with experience disagree.

I think the discounts are BMW's legitimate stab at the chicken and the egg problem of the dirtbike market. Dirt riders are herd animals. They benefit from sameness. The more people there are riding the same bike as you, the more setup knowledge gets shared, and the more aftermarket support there is. BMW can't sell dirt bikes to Americans until Americans see Husqvarna as a actual player in the market. Husqvarna can't be a player in the market untill they sell some dirt bikes to Americans. The discounts aren't desperation (I don't think). They are an entry strategy. Just like with Mini, you can see the concept, you can see them on a showroom floor, but you can't see yourself in one until you see one on the road. I think BMW believes that dirt riders will see themselves on a Husqvarna when they see one at the track or on the trail.

In one day of riding, my Husky drew a crowd. People wanted to know about it. When they asked what I paid for it, I told them, and people were astonished. "That's what the Honda place wants for an '08!" was one comment I heard.

Also "That pipe looks exposed"... but that's another topic.

I couldn't agree more and smiled while reading your last couple paragraphs. Reminds me of rides that I've done where theirs several other people. Folks are looking and asking questions.

Congrats on the new bike!

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