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Tips for floaters?

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I've been trying to teach myself these on my last two rides, but I just can't seem to get it...

I understand the concept; Jab inside peg, straighten inside arm, pull outside arm... It just doesn't work for me! I know I'm doing something wrong, I don't think I'm applying enough force to the inside peg. It seems like when I really lean the bike, I always want to put my inside foot down, it feels like I'm going to fall over. And if I don't really lean, I just turn about 45 degrees and then straighten out for some reason...:lol:

Any tips?

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Yeah, I've been studying that one quite a bit. This one is really good, too :http://vimeo.com/2963128 For some reason, it just isn't clicking for me though. I feel way off balance when I'm doing it and always want to dab on the inside. I've tried it on flat ground, hills, and steep hills with little luck.

Do you need to apply the hard peg pressure before the front wheel comes up or after?

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Its sounds like you have the right idea for peg pressure and what to do with your arms, but your dabbing to the inside because your not keeping your weight centered over the bike. You must keep the scales balenced. If your going to lean a certain amount of the bikes weight to the inside of center to make the bike pivot you must counter that weight in equal amount with your own body weight to the outside to keep everything from falling over. If your straightening up midway through the turn its because you letup on your inside peg pressure.

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That makes sense. Maybe I didn't have my inside leg wide enough to allow the bike to lean without me going with it... I can picture in my mind exactly what I need to do, I just need to translate that to my body making the moments! That can be an issue for me, like doing stoppie pivots on my mountain bike. I can pivot to the right all day long, but for some reason I just can't do it to the left! I'll load the front, but then I just freeze up. If I really concentrate I can do it, but I can only get like 10 degrees of rotation... I guess I'm just defective:bonk:

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He,He, If you place your feet one inch away from the fraim and ride on the balls of your feet for this and most other manuvers you will have enough room between your leg and the fraim when you move your body to the outside of the turn.

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He,He, If you place your feet one inch away from the fraim and ride on the balls of your feet for this and most other manuvers you will have enough room between your leg and the fraim when you move your body to the outside of the turn.

BINGO! and the other point liviob made.. If you master your slow turns first, a floater is noting more than a correct turn done with the front wheel in the air.. Lean in even just a little and you fall in.

Fall in and you'll add throttle to catch yourself and the increase in speed will make your turn get wider

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Hmmm, that's usually how I ride. Next time I'll start out with some small sharp turns to warm up and see if they gets my mind in the right place. I can do pretty good turns, really leaning the bike in but I don't think I was applying that to my floaters really well. I think I was trying to do them with too much body input and not enough foot input.

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Hmmm, that's usually how I ride. Next time I'll start out with some small sharp turns to warm up and see if they gets my mind in the right place. I can do pretty good turns, really leaning the bike in but I don't think I was applying that to my floaters really well. I think I was trying to do them with too much body input and not enough foot input.

Quite often, beginners try to learn floaters to make up for the lack of proper turning skills. They enter a tight turn and because their legs are holding the bike upright, it fails to turn so as they run out of room. The tendency then is to try and pull the front into the air and pull it around. Also, it "LOOKS" cool. :)

Be careful you are not using it as a crutch. Very rarely are they required. One of the few places they are useful is in a 90 degree into a log jump where maybe you are only 3 feet away from the log and need to make a turning jump. And I believe the TTC video examples are pretty close to that scenario only replacing the log with a rock.

:lol:

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Yeah, you got me! I want to learn because they look cool!:lol:

Well we also have some steep short hill wall things around here and it looks like it would be fun to go up then and do a floater at the top, then come down.

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Slightly off subject but I've learned from dancing that a problem in execution of a move is usually created by what was done several steps before rather than at the point of the problem. So 2-Ply's comments about basic turns fit.

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Yeah, you got me! I want to learn because they look cool!:banghead:

Well we also have some steep short hill wall things around here and it looks like it would be fun to go up then and do a floater at the top, then come down.

Well, I'm pretty old so I've had plenty of time to do the same things you guys are doing, make all of the mistakes you are going to make and then time to watch others go through the same learning curve.. And "Floaters" are irresistible!! They do look "cool" but not as cool as when an expert at tight turns on the ground, who doesn't NEED to use them, does one. :):lol:

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Yeah, but without guys like me trying to look cool then who would the rest of you laugh at?:lol:

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Yeah, but without guys like me trying to look cool then who would the rest of you laugh at?:banghead:

Yeah, but you might not get over the embarrassment when YOU pull a big floater in a tight turn during competition and the next guy turns inside your track with both tires on the ground... :lol: Trust me, you'll feel pretty silly about then.. ask me how I know.. :cheers: No, wait a minute.... Don't ask. :)

Though no one will poo poo you, (Trials People are too polite for that) however, they might snicker a little. It's your friends that might razz you a little.. :smirk:

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I'm sure they'll have plenty more to chuckle at that me just using a move that's too flashy!

Ma, i really want to get started on my rebuild but I don't want to stop riding! It's actually SUNNY today!!!

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Floaters are great for getting over elevated logs at an angle or maintaining traction in slick conditions. I have a problem getting my hips turned quickly on the body weight transition from inside to outside peg. When the timing is there (rarely) it feels great and makes me feel like a real trials rider...Here's a pic of Stu from Jackscycles floating a angled log. He really gets his hips around and can seemingly ride the floater at a snails pace when needed. :lol:

http://s182.photobucket.com/albums/x197/jackscycles/?action=view&current=JA9K0889n.jpg

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Aghhh, I still don't got it! I tried for a good 20 minutes today and by the end I was sort of "turning" about 90 degrees in a huge arc. I'll see if I can get a video up later, but the angle is kind of bad.

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Aghhh, I still don't got it! I tried for a good 20 minutes today and by the end I was sort of "turning" about 90 degrees in a huge arc. I'll see if I can get a video up later, but the angle is kind of bad.

As you wind up for the jumping turn, start the turn and lift from a stop.. That is, slow approach and then sink the knees down and forward and open the knees as you hit the brakes for a stop and use the rebound of the front suspension to help the lift WITHOUT gaining any real speed WHILE you tip the bike over against the inside leg.

It's almost a pivot turn so any forward momentum will hurt and make the turn much wider. A lot of things have to come together to pull it off correctly... But slow down and practice getting the front up without a bunch of throttle... Remember that video of Toni Bou jumping the rocks with the engine completely OFF??!!?? :lol:

Here it is if you missed it:

And here's Frostbite (Tim) training with the engine off too. Until this video, he had NEVER jumped a log on any motorcycle.. No trees and not even any driftwood up in Iqaluit... Just miles and miles of endless Trials Sections on bare rocks... :) oh what I would give to have that in my back yard!!

http://vimeo.com/6063165

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Yes, I definitely noticed that going slower helped towards the end. I'll try and get that video up but I still need to edit out a lot, it's like 20 minutes long now...

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Yes, I definitely noticed that going slower helped towards the end. I'll try and get that video up but I still need to edit out a lot, it's like 20 minutes long now...

:) Yes, videos are nice, but they can really get out of hand and bury you in editing Hell..

I have deep regard for anyone that does more then just export a single clip to You Tube.. Multiple clips of about 2 hours at least with a lot of stuff to cut out, reduced to 15 minutes with good sound and tasteful transitions takes a lot of time!!!

Many people have no idea of what it takes to put an entertaining short video together.

But for training purposes and riding examples, I overlook editing expertise.. :lol:

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