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Washington thoughts on fenders

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After 20 yrs, I'm a beginning trail rider all over again. I drop my bike periodically like everyone. I do however, seem to destroy my rear fenders with some frequency. I'm pretty handy with metal fab. considering fabbing an alum. rear fender with a spring-loaded hinge(hinge location at rear of seat). The idea is when I wash out the rear, and lay it down...The fender will flip up somewhat out harms way. I'm a worse case scenario kind of guy, so safety is my primary concern. Is this a bad idea? Even plastics can be expensive. I've thought about it a while...no sharp edges, etc. Should I just forget it, and work on a modified plastic fender that's basically a tear-a-way...To be reattached later? Either way, I'm big on saving money on repairs. Any thoughts? A note: I'm a tinkerer. sometimes I fix things that aren't broken. I'm open to opinions, positive or not.

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Either way, I'm big on saving money on repairs. Any thoughts?

I've sewn a few rear fenders and a couple shrouds by drilling holes and sewing with safety wire or zip ties. I then buy a new one and keep the sewn up one as backup. I've been known to by cheap on ocassion.:lol:

Maybe another option would be purchasing one of those rear billet racks, or make one. It might protect the rear fender better. Be happy that you are not causing subframe damage when looping out! :)

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After 20 yrs, I'm a beginning trail rider all over again. I drop my bike periodically like everyone. I do however, seem to destroy my rear fenders with some frequency. I'm pretty handy with metal fab. considering fabbing an alum. rear fender with a spring-loaded hinge(hinge location at rear of seat). The idea is when I wash out the rear, and lay it down...The fender will flip up somewhat out harms way. I'm a worse case scenario kind of guy, so safety is my primary concern. Is this a bad idea? Even plastics can be expensive. I've thought about it a while...no sharp edges, etc. Should I just forget it, and work on a modified plastic fender that's basically a tear-a-way...To be reattached later? Either way, I'm big on saving money on repairs. Any thoughts? A note: I'm a tinkerer. sometimes I fix things that aren't broken. I'm open to opinions, positive or not.

I would stay away from a metal fender. Many plastics are far more resililient in minor abuse situations. No get past that, weight would become as issue. A spring loaded rear fendor might reduce breakage.

Note: I am a design engineer and think about things for no reason :lol:

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Thanks for the thoughts. I put a lot of miles down when I ride. Theoretically, I haven't destroyed very many (3 last month). I don't believe I'm very fast on the bike. I am very aggressive, and always pushing myself. My main riding partner is very fast in the woods. It's proud day when I stay in visual contact, providing he doesn't sandbag.

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Thanks for the thoughts. I put a lot of miles down when I ride. Theoretically, I haven't destroyed very many (3 last month). I don't believe I'm very fast on the bike. I am very aggressive, and always pushing myself. My main riding partner is very fast in the woods. It's proud day when I stay in visual contact, providing he doesn't sandbag.

Keep up that riding level and you'll improve thus reducing the need for new fenders.

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+1

Keep at it and pretty soon you won't be breaking any more fenders.

Rather than designing and making one out of metal, just stitch your broken fender together with duct tape and bailing wire. Sure, it will look like garbage, but once you go a month without breaking it apart again, buy a new one as a reward.

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Thanks for the input! I just finished pulling off all the body-work on my bike. I found a couple things had vibrated loose. I'm giving it thorough "once-over" and some Loctite so I can put it back into service. I'll give the ugly fender a try, leaving the new one on the wall, for now. Repacking the silencer while I'm at it (the old packing naaaaaaasty!)

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After 20 yrs, I'm a beginning trail rider all over again. I drop my bike periodically like everyone. I do however, seem to destroy my rear fenders with some frequency. I'm pretty handy with metal fab. considering fabbing an alum. rear fender with a spring-loaded hinge(hinge location at rear of seat). The idea is when I wash out the rear, and lay it down...The fender will flip up somewhat out harms way. I'm a worse case scenario kind of guy, so safety is my primary concern. Is this a bad idea? Even plastics can be expensive. I've thought about it a while...no sharp edges, etc. Should I just forget it, and work on a modified plastic fender that's basically a tear-a-way...To be reattached later? Either way, I'm big on saving money on repairs. Any thoughts? A note: I'm a tinkerer. sometimes I fix things that aren't broken. I'm open to opinions, positive or not.

First of all, I think it's a neat idea! I too, am a bit of a tinkerer, and I like the idea of a spring loaded fender. I also think Plastic would work better, as metal would ding and once "twisted" it will never go back to straight and square.

3 fenders a month??!?!?!?!?!?! I ride also ride a lot (relative term), but haven't broken 3 fenders in my life...

If you need a couple fenders to play around with, Bills Motorcycles Plus in Salem has a HUGE surplus of all kinds of plastics for all kinds of bikes...

http://billshusky.com/

Another suggestion would be to concentrate on being smooth, instead of being fast on the trials... Don't worry about keeping your buddy in sight. Focus on keeping your line smooth, and error free, and I gaurentee your overall speed will increase.

Good luck!! :lol:

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DO NOT DO THAT. Seriously if you loop and end up in the end of it as it fold nothing good will come of it. A guillotine for your back. Get a fender off a 02-03 GG and graft it on there. You can roll it up like a cinnamon roll and it springs back. Flimsy flexible mud flap of a thing. Thought it was stupid and first now think it is brilliant.

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Thanks for the input! 3 fenders is lot I suppose. I'm trying relearn some technique and unlearn some. Some of my mountain biking experience applies, then again, some of it screws me up. One piece of advice I use a lot "When in doubt, gas it out"

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Just fab a fender out of an old tire. Sturdy enough to serve its purpose,yet soft enough to fold on impact. Oh and it would meet the ugly criteria... Lol

Sometimes, ugly is cool. Like a '57 DeSoto.

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or a six days edition :lol:

Who knows,a couple coats of orange,red,blue,yellow,or green paint and you may have 2012's must have off road accessory on your hands. Lol

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Fenders, smenders. Who needs 'em?

Still runnin' like a champ! :lol::banana::)

784152118_avCob-L.jpg

DUDE!!!! You broke my custom painted fender? That old YZ has provided miles of smiles for several peeps. What a solid bike.

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DUDE!!!! You broke my custom painted fender? That old YZ has provided miles of smiles for several peeps. What a solid bike.

Oooops. :)

Yep, but hey, I saved it! Its in a place of honor...er...somewhere in my garage.

And don't worry about the mighty YZ, I fixed it up better then new since then and have been doing plenty of maint (new clutch plates, top end, tires, tubes, wheel bearings, chain, sprockets, silencer, kick stand, throttle cable, fork seals and some other stuff I can't remember right now). :lol:

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