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time to re-build 08 200

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got my 200 xc-w new. as of now it has about 65 hours on it. i am getting ready to rebuild. i have never done anything to the motor (except carb work) or the suspension. i was new to the sport at the time of purchase and really didn't know crap about the bike. my buddies convinced me to not even mess with the jetting, even though it seemed wrong. anyway. i have come a long way with my skills as a mechanic and a rider. i basically ride local trails, not near as often as i would like... and i think i have the jetting pretty good... finally.

to my questions. the lbs doesn't do suspension really... other than basic stuff. should i bite the bullet and send it to ktmworld? which is 1000 miles or so away or should i try to find someone more local? i am in eastern n.y close to the berkshires. how far should one go realistically with the suspension to ride trails. i know many many people have posted it is the best upgrade one can do. but will it make a difference just rippin around on local trails? being a novice??does spending 1000.00 plus on suspension make sense??

secondly , going to replace top end (at least) is there any other thing that should be taken care of with 65 hours? i hate the service manual on a disc. it seems to give basic info... torc specs. maybe it is just me. could read the service book for my buddies yz for hours. packed with info.

appechiate everyones input & time. i will go back to the 200 thread and read some more. thanks again.

anything else you suggest doing over the winter would be apprechiated.

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got my 200 xc-w new. as of now it has about 65 hours on it. i am getting ready to rebuild. i have never done anything to the motor (except carb work) or the suspension. i was new to the sport at the time of purchase and really didn't know crap about the bike. my buddies convinced me to not even mess with the jetting, even though it seemed wrong. anyway. i have come a long way with my skills as a mechanic and a rider. i basically ride local trails, not near as often as i would like... and i think i have the jetting pretty good... finally.

to my questions. the lbs doesn't do suspension really... other than basic stuff. should i bite the bullet and send it to ktmworld? which is 1000 miles or so away or should i try to find someone more local? i am in eastern n.y close to the berkshires. how far should one go realistically with the suspension to ride trails. i know many many people have posted it is the best upgrade one can do. but will it make a difference just rippin around on local trails? being a novice??does spending 1000.00 plus on suspension make sense??

secondly , going to replace top end (at least) is there any other thing that should be taken care of with 65 hours? i hate the service manual on a disc. it seems to give basic info... torc specs. maybe it is just me. could read the service book for my buddies yz for hours. packed with info.

appechiate everyones input & time. i will go back to the 200 thread and read some more. thanks again.

anything else you suggest doing over the winter would be apprechiated.

Can O Worms...opened.

Susp, it definitely needs a service, revalve is up to you. You will have to determine if it is worth it. Are you having any issues? I can just about pay for 2 revalves for $1000, so no, to me it is NOT worth it. IMHO, also staying local is mucho worth it. What if you get it back and it needs adjustments??, then more shipping and more down time. I like having someone close and can't imagine ever shipping my suspension anywhere, or paying anywhere near that. Some simply don't have that option however.

65 hours is really nothing on these bikes. I have 69 hours on this topend and won't be thinking about a new piston for many more hours unless there is a reason to, scoring on the piston, etc. I may put some rings on it soon, but I see no need for a topend at this point. However, it depends on how you ride, etc. Are they hard hours or trail riding easy hours?

Otherwise, I would check all the bearings, pull the swingarm and check those bearings. Those on my last bike went to crap with no indication. It really is going to depend on how much water and mud you ride in, though.

Check your throttle cable, likely replace for peace of mind.

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thanks gmoss. as normal your reply saved my day.

does anyone know of a suspension person close to me? how about factory connection? they are way closer, but has anyone used them for wp suspension? i am about 155 lbs with no gear. also being a newbie i don't know if the suspension needs a re-valve. the suspension seems to be my last big mystery.

thanks again. you guys are the best. even for newbies dumb questions...

apprechiate it lots.

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thanks gmoss. as normal your reply saved my day.

does anyone know of a suspension person close to me? how about factory connection? they are way closer, but has anyone used them for wp suspension? i am about 155 lbs with no gear. also being a newbie i don't know if the suspension needs a re-valve. the suspension seems to be my last big mystery.

thanks again. you guys are the best. even for newbies dumb questions...

apprechiate it lots.

No problem.

My bike had FC susp on it when I bought it. I just had that forks redone and the shock will be done soon locally. I weigh a bit more than the PO, and he rode in NH, not NC. I don't think they did anything magical or special and wouldn't spend anymore with them than I would with whom I use.

If you don't know if it needs a revalve, why spend the money? If you cannot convey what you want out of the bike to the tuner, you are leaving it 100% up to him to get it right. This can end up with a dissatisfied customer even with a good set up, especially if you don't know which way to turn the clickers. It is somewhat a game of opposites. 2008 stock susp is not the best setup, but if you aren't having any issues, then you may not want to spend the money. Your time may be better spent turning clickers and learning how each affect performance so that you can communicate well with whomever does your susp. Also, just a service will make them feel much better.

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thanks again... i am a long time cross country type mountain biker. with all the suspension technology since the late 90's, my bike of choice at this point is a rigid 29" singlespeed. i have boat loads of different bonkers in my basement that i could never really "feel" a big difference one to the next. i just know in bicycles i always liked my stuff set up the way a 220lb guy would have his. firm/fast. i know that motorized has way more input to the ride/traction/control. but i don't really know where to begin. and since 99.9% of the riding i do is alone , i really don't have much direction. so, once again thanks to all on this forum who have taken time to help and answer questions over the years. apprechiate it greatly.

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I also came over from cross country mtn biking.

I, like you, like firm but not harsh. The 200, IMHO is a great bike for us with a mtn biking background, lightweight, easy to keep momentum on and throw around. Just enough power to get the job done, but not overpowering. I find myself coasting a lot, getting that mtn bike feeling. lol

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I also came over from cross country mtn biking.

I, like you, like firm but not harsh. The 200, IMHO is a great bike for us with a mtn biking background, lightweight, easy to keep momentum on and throw around. Just enough power to get the job done, but not overpowering. I find myself coasting a lot, getting that mtn bike feeling. lol

Yet another mountain biking 200 owner here :lol:

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HA!! I also mtn biked in the past and I'm now on a 2012 200. Back to your questions, I think it really depends on what you are doing with the bike, how good you are, and if you have money that is burning a hole in your pocket. If you have not checked your sag, you need to do that because it will make a difference. If you have the chance, ride a buddies bike that has susp work and then make your decision from there. I'm with gmoss on the topend. I think your good with that, maybe rings. I've had my susp done by Jeff Slavens and he did a really good job. I rode a guys that was done by KTM world and I really couldn't tell a difference between the two. I had an 09 250 xcf that had susp work done by House of Horsepower and the KTM World and Slavens were both better in the stroke and with bottoming out. Smoother over all ride. If you are looking to stay on the cheaper side, another option is changing the spring rates and fluid weight. Good luck!!

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Yet another mountain biking 200 owner here :lol:

Yet another one here, although I took the long way to the 200 (owning a 300, 250, 300 4stroke, 550 4stroke first).

My 2008 200 has about 780 hours on it. I put new top ends in at 230, 430 and 685 hours, replated the cylinder at 685 hrs and had cooksey crank (andrewgc on ktmtalk) rebuild the bottom end at 685 hrs.

I think you are a long long way from needing a rebuild. Stop wasting time on the interwebz and go ride your bike some more.

does spending 1000.00 plus on suspension make sense

not really. $1000 is a LOT of money. You should be able to get it revalved for more like $500 plus springs if necessary (i can almost guarantee at least a rear spring is needed, since stock is about right for my 120 lb wife).

the 2008 was the last year the suspension valving really sucked stock. If you are putting along you might not notice, but it is somehow both harsh and too soft at the same time. Trailtricks (socal) did the work on my bike. I'm sure there is someone good that is more local to you. I'd stay away from the big-name mx tuners and stick with someone that specializes in off-road. Maybe ask in the regional forum.

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thanks guys... comments noted! i will look into local tuners. and if it wasn't dark @ 5 pm these days and full tilt hunting season i would definetly be riding instead of sitting here trying to learn from more experienced guys/gals.

its funny cause there have been more than one occasion that i have attempted a log crossing and had the rear end just totally buck me over the bars in a hurry. i have both ends adjusted to the sag recommended in the manual with the clickers maybe 2 off of the recommended for my weight...

i suk! but. the smile on my face pushes the goggles up over my eyes.... love it

want to learn, be faster,stronger etc.etc.

thanks again

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thanks guys... comments noted! i will look into local tuners. and if it wasn't dark @ 5 pm these days and full tilt hunting season i would definetly be riding instead of sitting here trying to learn from more experienced guys/gals.

its funny cause there have been more than one occasion that i have attempted a log crossing and had the rear end just totally buck me over the bars in a hurry. i have both ends adjusted to the sag recommended in the manual with the clickers maybe 2 off of the recommended for my weight...

i suk! but. the smile on my face pushes the goggles up over my eyes.... love it

want to learn, be faster,stronger etc.etc.

thanks again

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thanks guys... comments noted! i will look into local tuners. and if it wasn't dark @ 5 pm these days and full tilt hunting season i would definetly be riding instead of sitting here trying to learn from more experienced guys/gals.

its funny cause there have been more than one occasion that i have attempted a log crossing and had the rear end just totally buck me over the bars in a hurry. i have both ends adjusted to the sag recommended in the manual with the clickers maybe 2 off of the recommended for my weight...

i suk! but. the smile on my face pushes the goggles up over my eyes.... love it

want to learn, be faster,stronger etc.etc.

thanks again

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its funny cause there have been more than one occasion that i have attempted a log crossing and had the rear end just totally buck me over the bars in a hurry.

were you seated? stand up for log crossings and weight the pegs. Either go slow enough that you can absorb the rear wheel bump with your legs, or lean back and apply enough throttle to keep the bike level when the rear wheel bumps. :lol:

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If you have the sag set correctly (with your weight on the bike) and you still have the original rear spring you probably have too much preload on the spring. Its really important to have the correct rear spring, there's lots of discussion on here about it. Read through and figure whats right for your weight (fully geared up) and look for a used spring. You'll be surprised how much better the bike reacts. If you want to spend some of your money, try buying a trials tire for the rear.

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Unless you've got $$$ to burn, do yourself a favor and get your suspension set up yourself. Spend some time setting the sag and then start playing with the clickers so you know what they do. There's plenty of free good info out there how to do this. I'm 140# without gear. The manual says the OEM stock suspension is set up for about 180# rider. That alone tells you to maybe think about a lighter shock spring. I changed out mine and it made a huge difference. Switch out the shock spring, set the sag correctly, and go out and play with the clickers. You probably won't need to change out the fork springs, but that would be next on my list.

I've go 150+hrs. on my '09 200xc-w and haven't even given it a thought about a top end rebuild. My riding is a mostly trail riding with some Dual Sport rides thrown in. Maybe I'll get around to throwing in a new set of rings this winter if warranted by a compression check.

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were you seated? stand up for log crossings and weight the pegs. Either go slow enough that you can absorb the rear wheel bump with your legs, or lean back and apply enough throttle to keep the bike level when the rear wheel bumps. :)

i really try to stand 100% of the time. unless catching my breath from trail to trail on connector dirt road or something. and even then i try to stand. that is one major thing that i remember from my weekend with s. watts. stand!!! he pounded that in my head. the other main thing i remember was all the b.s. he gave the one dude that had a auto-clutch thing. i think he said they were fer posers. not exactly sure , but it was funny. ( not near as funny as all the folks his class that got to see me crash around the open trails after owning the bike for like 2 weeks.... that dude was fast!!! i bet you he is still laughing if he remembers me. i have gotten much much more comfortable. but still am a show. :lol:

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