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Ideal Fork Height???

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Has anyone played with lowering and raising the forks in the triple clamps to find the ideal placement for a sharping turning bike, while maintaining high speed stability?

In turn what would this do to the rear sag and what would be the corresponding rear ride height to avoid the dreaded stink bug effect?

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Has anyone played with lowering and raising the forks in the triple clamps to find the ideal placement for a sharping turning bike, while maintaining high speed stability?

In turn what would this do to the rear sag and what would be the corresponding rear ride height to avoid the dreaded stink bug effect?

The X does not have a 'stick-bug' issue, regardless of settings. It's linkage Bell hanger linkage is not excessively long like on the R's or KX's.

Set your rear sag at 25/100, and drop your clamps down 5mm.

That is the 'standard'.

But that doesn't mean you will like it!

Try it.

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My are up 5mm and the rear sag is set at 100mm. If your running a dampner or not can change what you can get away with.

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I've dropped my triples (raised my forks) a full 10 mm. Rear sag set at 100 mm. Makes the bike feel like it turns quicker.:lol:

I probably prefer it because I rode a 250 for a couple of years before I bought the 450 and was used to a quicker turning bike.

I haven't noticed any high speed stability issues, and my 2005 doesn't even have a steering damper. But I really don't ride at high speeds for extended periods.:)

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So are you guys measuring from the top of the fork tube and below the fork cap? or measuring from the top of the cap?

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I've dropped my triples (raised my forks) a full 10 mm. Rear sag set at 100 mm. Makes the bike feel like it turns quicker.:lol:

I probably prefer it because I rode a 250 for a couple of years before I bought the 450 and was used to a quicker turning bike.

I haven't noticed any high speed stability issues, and my 2005 doesn't even have a steering damper. But I really don't ride at high speeds for extended periods.:)

That was my issue, coming off a quick steering two stroke too

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The ideal/proper fork height for the X is...

Top of the tube flush with the top of the clamp.

But then again the TT braintrust knows better than the engineers at Honda that designed the bike.......There may be some percieved improvement, but all in all the best setup is stock.

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The ideal/proper fork height for the X is...

Top of the tube flush with the top of the clamp.

But then again the TT braintrust knows better than the engineers at Honda that designed the bike.......There may be some percieved improvement, but all in all the best setup is stock.

You're right. Some may be just "perceived" improvement. It's tough for me to discerne subtle changes when they are made on different weekends.

However, I think Honda has to set up the bike to satisfy both high speed desert riding customers and slower speed tight trail riding customers. The result is a compromise. IMO, the stock bike is a very good compromise trail bike.

I hope that the small adjustments I make to "tune" the set-up in one direction or the other better matches my predominant riding style and terrain.:lol:

Edited by Sofiedog

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.......There may be some percieved improvement, but all in all the best setup is stock.

Why do manufacturers give us other adjustments then?

Different people have different requirements and riding styles so making adjustments whether to make it turn in quicker or be more stable at speed are part of the personalism (is that a word?) of your bike.

If manufacturers have it right from the start why do racers spend hours at different tracks and in some cases have suspension experts etc just to get things right.

:lol:

Edited by ratter
added smiley :)

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The ideal/proper fork height for the X is...

Top of the tube flush with the top of the clamp.

But then again the TT braintrust knows better than the engineers at Honda that designed the bike.......There may be some percieved improvement, but all in all the best setup is stock.

Yah right, I can tell by the X listed in your garage that stock is best...LOL

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The ideal/proper fork height for the X is...

Top of the tube flush with the top of the clamp.

But then again the TT braintrust knows better than the engineers at Honda that designed the bike.......There may be some percieved improvement, but all in all the best setup is stock.

Say's who? There is no spec in the manual.

Hmmmm, that's funny. I wonder why Applied, BRP, and ProCircuit reccomend 3-5mm of tube above the clamp?

Must be all hype I guess.

When I rode my X today with 5mm above the clamps, for the first time, I guess it was a placebo effect that I could turn easier with out taking my feet off the pegs, in deep sand, or that I did not have one incident of understeer all day, when I usually have several.

I guess I better put them right back to stock, cause I must be imagining it.

:lol:

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There are many things this applies to. Here is my thought(not that it matters): If someone changed your fork height and you did not know, would it make a difference that you would notice while riding?

Excluding the obvious extreme changes...

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There are many things this applies to. Here is my thought(not that it matters): If someone changed your fork height and you did not know, would it make a difference that you would notice while riding?

Excluding the obvious extreme changes...

Would you know the change was fork height? Maybe not, but if you can't feel the change, for whatever reason, you are the type of rider that has no mechanical empathy or feel. Some of the best riders are that way. I find it tons of fun to experiment and discover 'synergystic' traits about a bike and it's mods. Like tire choice. Every damn tire out there is good. But some are better. Why pick the good ones...just put on any old tire and say 'no one can tell the difference' and be stubborn and closed minded about it. Then you can justify your poor choices more easily.

Then there's Ricky Carmichael; he would alter his tire pressue after 2 laps because it would go up .5 ft lbs. from friction. Not that he couldn't win otherwise...it's about what you are comfortable with.

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Say's who? There is no spec in the manual.

Hmmmm, that's funny. I wonder why Applied, BRP, and ProCircuit reccomend 3-5mm of tube above the clamp?

Must be all hype I guess.

When I rode my X today with 5mm above the clamps, for the first time, I guess it was a placebo effect that I could turn easier with out taking my feet off the pegs, in deep sand, or that I did not have one incident of understeer all day, when I usually have several.

I guess I better put them right back to stock, cause I must be imagining it.

:smirk:

Actually there is a spec in the manual.

Glad to hear your bike is turning well.:bonk:

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