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Studded Tires

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I was just wondering have any of you made up some studded snow tires? I was kicking around making a set and doing some trail riding this year and i was wondering what tires are the best to use and what is the best way to run the studs? I would assume going from the inside out would be the best so they wouldnt pull out as easy. But on the other hand i have seen alot of guys running the cold cutter studs i think they and you just screw into the knobbie from the outside?

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I would think that screwing them from the inside would make them prone to pushing in and rubbing a hole in your tube.

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I was just wondering have any of you made up some studded snow tires? I was kicking around making a set and doing some trail riding this year and i was wondering what tires are the best to use and what is the best way to run the studs? I would assume going from the inside out would be the best so they wouldnt pull out as easy. But on the other hand i have seen alot of guys running the cold cutter studs i think they and you just screw into the knobbie from the outside?

I've made a few sets of tires. No, you do not go from the inside - you drive them in from the outside.

If you want to do a cheap experiment and try it out, go to your local HVAC supply house and buy a tub of 5/8" sheet metal zip screws. You could probably go with 3/4" - definitely for the rear. The tire carcass is pretty thick - close to 1/2" at least, so you can use screws that are ~1/4" longer than knob height. Anyway, the important thing is to get the screws that have the threads taper down to a sharp point, NOT the self tapping screws. They have a hex head, so you'll use a small nutdriver on a drill to put them in. You can get a tub of 1000 screws for about $15. It's enough screws to do a couple of bikes.

Use the tires that are on your bike now. You don't even have to take them off - just drive one screw in each knob in the front tire. Drive one screw per side knob in the rear (the small ones), and 2 or 3 per knob for the big ones down the middle, depending on individual knob size. More is better.

It'll only take about 45 minutes to stud up your bike.

I've found that the screws hold in place well - they only start getting torn out once the snow/ice melts and you start hitting roots and rocks. At the end of the winter, pull the tires off and put on a new set. Replace any lost screws, and you'll be all set for next winter!

JayC

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i have looked into this a little also. i have not made a set of studded tires yet but got a few info websites. they seem a little pricey for fun but i bet they would work well. i may try the sheet metal screws and see how they work.

http://www.ronniesmailorder.com/catalog_keyword_search3.asp?keysearch=Go&dofts=true&keyword=ice+screws&submitfrm=Search

http://mf44.ca/en/

this guy used carriage bolts threw from the inside

http://www.thumpertalk.com/forum/showthread.php?t=851381

http://www.marcelfournier.ca/index-en.php

check these sites out ^

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Thanks for the info guys! Also is there any particular brand or model tire that you would recommend?

Yea - whatever is on your bike right now. Condition is pretty much unimportant.

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6485245115_a892c4f412_z_d.jpg

JayC

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Have used both regular sheetmetal screws and the hardened type as advertised on Ronnies mail order. Regular screws work fine but wear down fast once your off the ice so depending on how long you plan on riding will determine which ones to use.

The tires I had the best results with were dual sport tires such as the el-cheapo Cheng Shin 858. The dual sport tires have a closer tread pattern than knobbies so the screw spacing can be closer and hard compound prevents the screws from pulling out.Easiest way to install them is a socket or nut driver attachment on a variable speed drill.

Traction is about the same as unstudded tire on dry pavement.

Spent many a day on the trails and lake near my home when conditions were favourable. Power slides on glare ice are a riot! When you slide out, just brush yourself off and get back on.

The down side. Riding a bike in winter is %$#@ing cold! No matter what you wear!

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i have used sheet metal screws and the one's that ronnies has.

you have to be very careful with the length of the screw. they suck down a little farther then think. i put them in one year and everything looked good and about 15min into the ride front and rear flats. the points on some of the screws

were just barely poking thru.

I just stepped up to these Grip studs.com

with carbide tips and the real aggressive auger they stay in and they will last for a couple of years.

I have 2 friends that have 3 seasons on them.

i have been out twice on them on frozen ground and they make you feel like your riding on Velcro. they are pricy but i put them in a set of new tires and i will leave them in and just put another set of unstudded tires on in the spring.

They still are a lot cheaper then tellaborges at 350 ea.:bonk:

Edited by Bentbars
wrong info

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I just stepped up to these Grip studs.com

with carbide tips and the real aggressive auger they stay in and they will last for a couple of years.

Incidentally, my suggestion for the $5 stud job is just for recreational riding. Screws are not allowed in winter racing (including the pricey ones). However, the screw studs mentioned above are.

JayC

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I did this once...wow...these things grabbed anything and everything :smirk:

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By rwcardinal at 2010-12-16

Ran them rear from the inside out and sheet metal screws on the front as stated above. No problems with the tube but check out the exhaust :bonk: Like stated above used an old set and got new in the spring (and exhaust)

Downside to any type of studs is that it makes your back tire into a meat cutting machine. Get that tire wrapped up in your leg and you got some serious problems. The ice racers build a special fender that wraps the shape of the tire for more protection. Have fun and don't ride alone.

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By rwcardinal at 2010-12-24

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I was just wondering have any of you made up some studded snow tires? I was kicking around making a set and doing some trail riding this year and i was wondering what tires are the best to use and what is the best way to run the studs? I would assume going from the inside out would be the best so they wouldnt pull out as easy. But on the other hand i have seen alot of guys running the cold cutter studs i think they and you just screw into the knobbie from the outside?

I run the press in studs, they are carbide tipped and last. They have a 6mm spike out the top of the tire and 8mm double barbed hour glass shaped portion that goes in the tire. a full studded tire runs $200 to $250 each but last a long time. with the right rear tire you can sink 3 to 4 studs in a single knob!!!426691_300091423377423_284964061556826_794093_723612680_n.jpg420682_313083235411575_284964061556826_828794_996555506_n.jpg

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