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my suspension is all stock for now, just want to make it better for my weight with the clickers. i am 250lbs. any advice on how many clicks i should go by? went 2 clicks in from stock setting already on all rebound and stiffness. should i go any more? thanks

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my suspension is all stock for now, just want to make it better for my weight with the clickers. i am 250lbs. any advice on how many clicks i should go by? went 2 clicks in from stock setting already on all rebound and stiffness. should i go any more? thanks

We don't know what you are feeling, how old the oil is, and how you ride, how fast you want to go, etc.

The best advice is to start with the stock settings, and make a diary of changes.

Ride the same section of terrain (the kind where you think the suspension is lacking) over and over again, until you get used to how the bike reacts to the terrain with small amounts of body and throttle input.

Then go 2 clicks stiffer on front and rear compression.

I strap a small screwdriver to my bars with cut up inner tube, so I can make changes away from staging.

Ride over and over again. Make notes.

If it handles better, but harsher, reduce the rebound front and rear by two clicks.

Ride over and over. Make notes.

Try going two more stiffer on compression. Or less.

Continue to reduce rebound, until it starts to 'rock' on you when accelerating or braking, or turning. Then go two clicks back stiffer.

Repeat.

Remember, the compression and rebound clickers affect each other. If you go 6 clicks harder on compression, you also went 1 or two harder on rebound, without even touching them.

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Krannie,

Great tips, I too am trying to dial in my stock suspension right now. Stiffening the front suspension has allowed me to skip over the woops much better but it seems to me that balancing the rebound to the compression is the key and like you said I just need to keep tweaking it to achieve the desired balance. I think rebound is the most difficult thing for me to guage and I never realized adjusting the compression affected rebound by itself, so this would account for some overtuning I made on the last ride.

Can you explain what you mean by: starts to 'rock' on you when accelerating or braking, or turning.

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Krannie,

Great tips, I too am trying to dial in my stock suspension right now. Stiffening the front suspension has allowed me to skip over the woops much better but it seems to me that balancing the rebound to the compression is the key and like you said I just need to keep tweaking it to achieve the desired balance. I think rebound is the most difficult thing for me to guage and I never realized adjusting the compression affected rebound by itself, so this would account for some overtuning I made on the last ride.

Can you explain what you mean by: starts to 'rock' on you when accelerating or braking, or turning.

First off let me say that I am not a suspension expert, and these are all my opinions only.

But I do play one on TV.

If you find your self having to change your body position a lot to keep 'balanced' when accelerating or braking, it's possible you are set up too soft.

Keeping weight on the pegs as much as possible also helps to feel the suspension action and keep balance.

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Anything that gets her better is a plus. The more miles I log the faster I'm riding and starting to notice the little things. At 48 I won't ever be racing but I wan't to be able to get the most out of the bike in performance and enjoyment and these post's really befefit the lesser experienced riders.

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Disclaimer: I'm no suspension expert.

Don't forget, tuning forks is not just about damping. It's important to have the proper springs, as well.

The Owner's Manual says on page 109 that the stock springs are meant for a 150 lb to 160 lb rider. Then, on page 118, they list 3 different available spring rates: 0.47 kg/mm (stock), 0.45 (softer), and 0.49 (stiffer).

So, I imagine what happens if a rider is heavier than 160lbs and uses the stock springs, then the forks will compress (sag) more than intended from the static load of the rider (static sag).

What does this cause? Well, it seems that the forks will have less travel available to dampen the acceleration, under dynamic loading

So, here's the counterintuitive part for me. If I'm a heavier rider and I want to "soften" the response of the forks when hitting big rocks during lower speed trail riding, then I should put in stiffer springs!!! Why? Because the fork will be sitting up higher in it's stroke under the static sag and will have more travel. With more travel, a lighter amount of "dynamic" damping has to be applied to achieve the same result as a fork with less travel. !!!:bonk:

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Disclaimer: I'm no suspension expert.

Don't forget, tuning forks is not just about damping. It's important to have the proper springs, as well.

The Owner's Manual says on page 109 that the stock springs are meant for a 150 lb to 160 lb rider. Then, on page 118, they list 3 different available spring rates: 0.47 kg/mm (stock), 0.45 (softer), and 0.49 (stiffer).

So, I imagine what happens if a rider is heavier than 160lbs and uses the stock springs, then the forks will compress (sag) more than intended from the static load of the rider (static sag).

What does this cause? Well, it seems that the forks will have less travel available to dampen the acceleration, under dynamic loading

So, here's the counterintuitive part for me. If I'm a heavier rider and I want to "soften" the response of the forks when hitting big rocks during lower speed trail riding, then I should put in stiffer springs!!! Why? Because the fork will be sitting up higher in it's stroke under the static sag and will have more travel. With more travel, a lighter amount of "dynamic" damping has to be applied to achieve the same result as a fork with less travel. !!!:bonk:

And, when you do this, you not only gain travel, you 'correct' the stroke. It starts at the top, not the middle, where the stock shim valving is very harsh.

So, when your springs are too soft, your ride is hard and harsh.

If you do add stiffer springs, it usually overwhelms the rebound valving to the point of barely working. That's why just changing springs alone cannot solve the suspension issues.

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This will be the next big bike project. I'm starting with hand guards, skid plate, and upgraded lighting then next will be a suspension upgrade. I've been told by some this should be the first upgrade but I've always been bas-akwards.

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first thing you need stiffer springs. PERIOD.

MXtech, Racetech both have spring calculators on their website. no twisting of clickers will substitute for the correct spring rates. Especially when you are almost 100lbs over the stock rates.

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I was about 260lbs with gear when bought my 450X new in '08. I had been off the trails many years and had not ever been on a big 4-stroke bike so I would have considered myself a beginner back then. Riding what would be considered "semi-agreesive" trials here in MI, right from the beginning I was WAY too heavy for the stock suspension. I was bottoming out on everything and the front wheel would tuck in every corner. It almost made me hate my bike that first season. That winter I took it to a suspension shop and had it set up, re-sprung/re-valved for my weight and riding style. WORLD of difference!! It almost instantly gave me more confidence (i.e. speed) and I was really able to use more of the bike's potential and keep up better with my buddies. With that said, it wasn't cheap but well worth it in my opinion.

Now with all that said......the second off season I lost 40lbs of body fat yet never touched the new suspension settings and the thing STILL handles awesome! I guess what I'm getting at (in my long, drawn out story) is that most likely you are too heavy for the stock springs unless maybe you ride smooth, flat trials or something.

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I was about 260lbs with gear when bought my 450X new in '08. I had been off the trails many years and had not ever been on a big 4-stroke bike so I would have considered myself a beginner back then. Riding what would be considered "semi-agreesive" trials here in MI, right from the beginning I was WAY too heavy for the stock suspension. I was bottoming out on everything and the front wheel would tuck in every corner. It almost made me hate my bike that first season. That winter I took it to a suspension shop and had it set up, re-sprung/re-valved for my weight and riding style. WORLD of difference!! It almost instantly gave me more confidence (i.e. speed) and I was really able to use more of the bike's potential and keep up better with my buddies. With that said, it wasn't cheap but well worth it in my opinion.

Now with all that said......the second off season I lost 40lbs of body fat yet never touched the new suspension settings and the thing STILL handles awesome! I guess what I'm getting at (in my long, drawn out story) is that most likely you are too heavy for the stock springs unless maybe you ride smooth, flat trials or something.

yea i will definatly get stiffer springs soon as i get some money

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Not to hijak completely....but I was in touch with a local suspension guy and was told around 200 with parts for a rebuild + 200 for new springs....and around 700 for a revalve/rebuild/new springs...does this sound right?

Do I need a re-valve? I am not planning on doing any racing anymore and have been pretty happy with the stock (Nothing to compare it to). I think the stiffer springs will definately help a lot, but do I need more than that?

I have some extra cash right now, but lso need to replace the drive (sprockets/chain/slidders/rollers), and possibly the dented up exhaust. Opinions?

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Not to hijak completely....but I was in touch with a local suspension guy and was told around 200 with parts for a rebuild + 200 for new springs....and around 700 for a revalve/rebuild/new springs...does this sound right?

Do I need a re-valve? I am not planning on doing any racing anymore and have been pretty happy with the stock (Nothing to compare it to). I think the stiffer springs will definately help a lot, but do I need more than that?

I have some extra cash right now, but lso need to replace the drive (sprockets/chain/slidders/rollers), and possibly the dented up exhaust. Opinions?

A wise man once said " the only 'best' you know is what you ride now ".

Suspension is THE thing to invest in, more than anything else. Well, accept maybe your kids futures, but heck, they're resilient, right?

The pricing of approx $700 for a full service, re-spring and re-valve is in the ball park: $600-$1000+.

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That's a good point, and I do agree that suspension is the best thing. I think the amount I can spend right now is all relative too. I am about to sell my truck and hope to get a good chunk of change for that. So maybe the extra 300 after I get the extra cash will be not as significant as it is to me now....

Those other things to replace are important too. My drive has never been changed, and the exhaust needs only one more fall or drop.

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You can get stiffer springs you need for around $200 give or take. If it has been a while since your suspension has been serviced, I would spend some extra money just replacing the fluids (assuming fork seals are still in great shape and not leaking). For the rear shock, I would have the shock oil changed, new bumper rubber, bladder, and might as well throw in a new oil seal head. You should be able to do all of the above (maintenance, parts, oil, springs) for under $300 if you do it yourself.

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A wise man once said " the only 'best' you know is what you ride now ".

Suspension is THE thing to invest in, more than anything else. Well, accept maybe your kids futures, but heck, they're resilient, right?

The pricing of approx $700 for a full service, re-spring and re-valve is in the ball park: $600-$1000+.

I agree 100% with Krannie. If you have it, I would spend the extra $ and get set up right. I think I was right around $1,000 with everything. Absolutely love my X now.

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I have found Factory Connection to be very helpful with used springs at a deep discount. They do so much work on Hondas they have a lot of springs laying around that may fit your needs. If you call them they will be glad to discuss your needs with you. They do not use a spring generator, they like to talk with you about your riding to get a feel for the right spring. They have a lot of experience with this. And Honda springs are very accurately rated. Like others have said, NOTHING will work until the springs are correct. Good luck.

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I have found Factory Connection to be very helpful with used springs at a deep discount. They do so much work on Hondas they have a lot of springs laying around that may fit your needs. If you call them they will be glad to discuss your needs with you. They do not use a spring generator, they like to talk with you about your riding to get a feel for the right spring. They have a lot of experience with this. And Honda springs are very accurately rated. Like others have said, NOTHING will work until the springs are correct. Good luck.

thanks for that info, i shall do that now. wonder if they have a spring rate for fat pig.

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