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Practice Track Recommendations - Jump Faces

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I want to include jump types that teach very specific and different techniques on a practice track. Some riders who will practice here are good off road riders, but with little jumping experience. Rather than just build a track...I want to chose the jump face geometry to help learn specific jumping skills.

Some ideas on things to include.

1. Traditional properly designed jump. 5.5-6.5 feet tall (vertically...so about 11-13' long face) at the recommended 30 degrees ramp angle. This is the easy jump. The loading of the suspension at normal riding speeds is such that it is not terribly hard to learn the throttle timing and body position to control the bike at take off, and hence get a good safe flight path. This jump will be a decent sized step up to descending table top type...where you can jump anywhere from 25' to about 70', and have nice safe cushy landing, while never getting to high, relative to the jump contour.

2. Big but mellow jump with shallow takeoff. Sometimes you have a big but mellow jump that is easy by itself, but hard to increase your jump distance on. I actually have trouble with this type of natural terrain jump sometimes. Because of the flat take off, it is harder to manipulate loading of the suspension to increase jump distance, unless you are going mach 5. This might be a good jump to really play with aggressive suspension pre-loading to get more distance.

3. The short jump with the face a bit too steep. The dreaded lawn dart jump. 4' or less tall, and steeper than normal...say 35 degrees, with a top that is very discrete (has not been rounded enough) This is a very good one to learn technique on, so that you know how to handle it. I think this should also be a slight step up to descending table top, for max safety. By keeping the rider following the contour of the step up and landing, you can work larger, while learning how to handle the physics of this jump type, with max safety.

4. The jump too close to a corner. 5' tall table top type, proper face...maybe slightly steeper than normal, safe landing...but really short approach. The type of jump a seat bounce would be good to learn on.

Any other ideas?

What I am looking for, is very specific jump types, which have unique body position and throttle timing requirements, on which to build all around jump skills.

Edited by Blutarsky

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I just got back from my first time at an indoor track and the funnest/most challenging jump wasn't the triple or giant table, it was a probably 3' in height at most and it was a long roller that lead into a small bump about 15-20 feet out (i could be wrong about that I suck at judging distance) and then you immediately had a left hander into a double with literally 0 run-up. It was incredibly hard to find the traction to clear the first double but it was very rewarding because you could carry a ton of speed through the corner and hit the next double by just giving it enough gas to not engine brake. Wish my GoPro hadn't been dead or I would have some decent footage to show what I'm talking about it.

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Sounds like a ton of fun! I wanna come ride at your house :smirk:

Another one that teaches you technique would be a safe rhythm section, like 3 tables much too close together, or some over spaced rollers that you can double through. It lets you get used to throttle control on the landing, as well as soaking up the landing so your suspension is settled in time for the next jump and not still bouncing :banana:

The other thing you could build is a step-on type double, to get comfortable jumping gaps. not very big, and with a nice flat or slightly down hill top to land on... Like this:

/\_/****--..

It's how I first got up the guts to start jumping doubles, because it's very unintimidating compared to a /\____/\ style double :bonk:

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Looks like you got the basics and a good plan. If you have the ability to build it will you have the ability to change it on a whim? If so, build it and change it, then build it and change it, and so on as experience increases.

This is an advanced skill but if you are racing you gotta have it, the capacity to deal with kickers or deteriorated jump faces. It's like anything else, ruts, woops, dragon backs, and so on, the more you ride it the better you will get with it... doesn't mean your gonna like it.

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Thanks for the tips guys...

Yeah...in my original post I noted that I was going to build a kicker type jump....where the face is too short, and too steep (35..maybe 40 degrees)...to learn to adjust and deal with kickers. It will be a step up roll over / table top...for max safety.

How big should our 'big jump' be?,,,for learning? Right now, I have laid out out a jump with a 6' vertical, 30 degree face. It steps up about 4', but it is like cross between a parabolic arc and a table top. You will pretty much be able to hit this thing from crawling speed...up to about 30 mph. At 17 mph...you will smoothly come back into the up slope...but at a mellow angle. At 22 mph...you will come down right on top like a feather. At 30 mph...you will be getting close to the flats...at 70' from take off to landing. Through this whole range, landing angles will be super safe. Is 70' too short?

Then again, as we get better...we can learn to absorb the jump face with more speed....so we dont end up in the flats...

I am also doing a section with 3 over spaced rollers, about 18' peak to peak...then a two bike length flat...then a small jump, but one you can still boost off of with good pre-load ...them some more over spaced rollers....to learn that throttle control.

There will also be a mellow learn whoops section. It will be a little over spaced...about 13-14' peak to peak...and rolled specifically to make it possible to learn all 3 whoops techniques (doubling, wheel tap, hammering)

What is a good jump geometry for learning a seat bounce. I was thinking a 4.5', standard 30 degree face...table top...but REALLY close to a corner exit.

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14' wide...Clockwise....

Jumpy stuff on the front half...back half is flat, and can be used for a variety of cornering practice drills.... The 3 tight corners connecting the jumps will be massively bermed...supercross style.

MotoTrainingTrack.jpg?t=1323925224

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Just curious what kind of program you used to mock that up? A friend of mine is going to building a track for a local company and something like that could really helps out, and could be used to build some hype before things get underway.

Looks pretty sick btw. Would kill to have something like even within 45 minutes of me.

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wow, sounds like you already got the right idea. post up some pics once you get this thing built :bonk:

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Just curious what kind of program you used to mock that up? A friend of mine is going to building a track for a local company and something like that could really helps out, and could be used to build some hype before things get underway.

Looks pretty sick btw. Would kill to have something like even within 45 minutes of me.

I did that in SolidWorks... But you could probably do the same in that free Google sketcher program...and save $4000...

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One tough jump at my local practice track is a straight with large rolling whoops, then a relatively short double at the end (15'), a step-on type double like SOAB was describing.

Before they had a whoop section, it was a series of 4 doubles varying distance from long to short at the end. This is where it would get tricky. Coming out of the turn you would hit the gas to make the first double, then stay on the gas for the second. By the 3rd double you had enough speed to just coast to clear it, but the 4th was short and even if you coasted to clear it, you would overshoot the berm right after. It's really a technical section. Even with the new whoop section you still are going too fast (unless you're rolling them) to make the jump without overshooting the berm.

The trick is, to be on the brakes for the face of the jump and bounce off the top into the immediate right hander. Yes, right hander, meaning no rear brake.

Teaches you front brake and body position.

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50-60 foot with poppy face to learn whips off to the side. Once you learn to whip a little correcting the bike in the air becomes easier and starts making sense.

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