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Does average weight/skill mean my OEM suspension comes dialled for me?

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Trying to weigh up the bang for the buck getting my 06 RM250 suspension 'seen to'. As far as I know, the modern RMs have quite decent stock suspension, particularly if the owner is average weight. Which should mean that for an average weight/skill rider, the value for getting a revalve would be minimal. But is that logic right?

I'm 80kg, and think the suspension is good, though I guess I find the front forks harsh (prolly due to my less than flash speed around the track), so keen to perhaps go one softer springs. But apart from that, anyone think getting a suspension expert to revalve would be that much value for me? (perhaps if 'modern' valving technology can be retrofitted?). People talk about how much faster they go after having their suspension 'done', but isn't that more for correct spring rate and/or damping rate change for non-average riders/enduro etc?

Keen for views.

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"Modern" valving isnt a bunch of "new parts" really. Its more an evolution of shims stacks that has come through testing and experience.

And yes, I believe that a beginner can benefit greatly from getting the suspension dialed for them personally. Typically what you see in OEM's regarding beginners is not enough low speed and too much high speed damping.

If your sag measurements are pretty close your springs are probably ok. There is a lot adjustment in the stock clickers. I personally think that a lot of beginners are intimidated by the clickers because they think they can screw something up. Ya cant. You can always turn the clickers back where they were if it was better where it was. Thats the whole point of the clickers.

I usually start with the rebound after getting the sag set. I set my rebound up to where the rear will be settled on fast corner entrances where the rear wheel is very very light because youve got the front brake clamped down. I set the rebound to where the rear stays put...but only just. One click here makes a difference. I want as little rebound as I can deal with. Then I start in on the compression. With the compression damping on the rear, you want the rear to be able to follow the ground out of corners and not deflect. Too much compression damping will have it kicking and skipping across breaking bumps and acceleration bumps. Backing the high speed bump adjustment out can really soak these up. There's a caveat there, when you open up that high speed clicker, you tend to upset the low speed and make it wallow a bit. You can then chase that a bit with the low speed clicker. Youre looking for the trade off between the two. You're not setting these for the big jump on the track. Youre setting these for everything in between. Thats where you spend 98% of the time...If it bottoms out on the big jump or a couple times a lap, thats good. Its supposed to. Otherwise its really too stiff and youre giving away your suspension travel.

The clickers should be in the middle of the ranges if the suspension is good for you when your happy with it. If you end up with a low speed clicker at say, 3 out from bottomed, you need a revalve and the potential there for you is great. If you get the jump landings to where youre bottoming it but not too bad, but whoops and breaking bumps and holes and smaller chop are just beating the crap out of you, you probably need a little more low speed and less high speed in the valve stack.

All this info is what you need to give your suspension guy so he can get you setup. Otherwise he's just guessing at what you want or need. Some of them guess pretty damn good, but why make them guess when you can simply spend a day or two with the stock clickers and glean your own info and possibly find a good setup on your own.

Now, get the screw driver out and start clickin...

Start everything in the middle of the range to begin with and go from there.

This all assumes that the suspension isnt worn out!

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Trying to weigh up the bang for the buck getting my 06 RM250 suspension 'seen to'. As far as I know, the modern RMs have quite decent stock suspension, particularly if the owner is average weight. Which should mean that for an average weight/skill rider, the value for getting a revalve would be minimal. But is that logic right?

If you are "average" weight and skill, the bike is probably sprung OK for your weight. Harshness is a valving issue, not springs. Valving, on the other hand, generally doesn't seem well suited to anybody. Stock valving is ALWAYS too harsh for pretty much everybody, regardless of brand. Why it is always set up badly, I don't know.

JayC

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Thanks guys. I am so grateful for this shared experience. Forums - where would we be without them?

I'm sure there'd be value in me getting some revalving done and putting in some 'testing' time on practice days. Thanks again.

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Old post I know but gotta give props to that. Why is it so easy to shuffle a few shims & get suspension that any " average rider " would agree is better?

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Who says its easy to make it suit every rider?

I would say its nearly impossible. to create a suspension which fits different riders.

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What a great post from Shawn. I have found through the years that I really had to learn about the suspension system on the bike. That way could understand how the clickers adjust each part of the suspension. It helps to know that the fork rebound adjusts the midvalve for example. You don't necessarily need to know every shim change...you can leave that to the tuner. But if you understand the components and get an idea for what direction feels better for you the tuner can better dial in the suspension.

When I first started out riding I never touched the clickers because I was afraid to. Then years later I sent the stuff out to factory connection- not even knowing what I wanted...just filed out the sheet and thought it would be good. Nope. Years and bikes passed and then I finally started to spin the clickers and understand the system- spring changes and oil levels just to start and see whats in there- then I could really get an idea of what I needed and could really communicate it to the tuners. Now I am a picky bastard and I can tell the guys what I like for valving and what will give me confidence. But then again a little knowledge isn't always a good thing either :)

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You tell me who said that. Read again.

Okay, define average rider. =)

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