Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  

Approached wrecked buddy procedure

Recommended Posts

My son's had two real close ones this month. One was a bogging throttle at takeoff on a 60' putting him landing on the front wheel almost vertical (riding right behind w/video and it was not cool) but he managed it. Second was tire went flat and he lost it on a double with the bike landing on him.

He knows since day one that even if he can't see me he has to give a thumbs up or wave me over whether he's ok or not. Best coaching move I've made yet for the last 5 years. Helps me tremendously from across the track. Even when my eyes are usually locked on him.

QUESTION (because this applies to adults):

What is the procedure when you see someone eat it hard, get knocked out, or break something? What if it's only the two of you on the track?

I've heard about the rule of not taking the helmet off or moving them.

BUT I NEED CLARITY!!! WHAT DO YOU DO WITH DIFFERENT SCENERIOS?

I plan on taking a CPR class. Bigger bikes, bigger jumps, etc; I do NOT want to not know what to do or, worse, do the wrong thing.

Thanks in advance.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I will let the professionals give the full answer, but the golden rule is "do no more harm", can they breath, is there a pulse!!!

There would be no reason to remove the helmet unless there was an airway obstruction and the patient is going to die if you don't remove the helmet and clear the mouth/airway...

I suggest you take a 1st aid course...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

First off make sure he's still breathing and has a pulse, but that is usually second nature and not something someone has to think about. Second, see if he's alert and can speak. If he is, communicate with him and make sure he knows where he is, what's going on and where he's at. Ask him if anything hurts; if yes, try to pin point it.

You don't want to move the patient more than necessary because it could make a bad injury worse. Sometimes it's best to get them on their back, and of course leave their helmet on. Applying neck support is important to, which is basically cradling the base of the back of the skull in your palms with your fingers along the back side of the neck. That's just to make sure he doesn't roll it around and injure it worse than it already is.

Obviously if the injury is life threatening, you'll want to call 911 and get the ambulance there to take care of it.

In any case, it's always good to ask the rider if they're alright, even if they didn't get knocked out or whatnot. It's always good to know there's someone else at the track watching out for you.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I don't want my kids doing 60ft doubles period,I've turned all my doubles on my home track into single-tabletop combos..they should all be like this as far as I'm concerned..I'm not judging you don't get me wrong,my kids are young and on 85s

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Just do a quick assessment if they had a bad crash. Remember your abc's

A-airway -Do they have an airway or is it obstructed by something or collapsed?

B-breathing -Are they breathing, if so what is there respiratory rate? Normal, slow, fast?

C- circulation- Pulse? do they have one and what is it?

Also check level of consciousness. Are they alert to where they are, what the date/time is, and who they are.

Your not really suppose to find a pulse according to the new guidelines for cpr, due to the fact many people will have difficulty finding one if you don't do it daily. The time wasted searching for a pulse could be spent starting cpr. The quicker you can start cpr the better.

After you check for the abc's check if they can move their extremities.

Ask them to tell you where the pain is coming from. If it was something that your not sure is a serious injury I would call 911 because it is always better to be safe then sorry. Many people that come in to the hospital via ambulance often aren't that seriously hurt and its more of a precaution.

Edited by 79yamdt
wrong info

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Some good advice posted above... I take basic life support courses through work on a semi-annual basis, and we've been told not to remove a helmet unless it is causing an airway obstruction - if the rider is having trouble or can't breathe the helmet comes off. More times than not, we leave them on and let the staff at the hospitals deal with removing them after they've ruled out spinal injuries.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I don't want my kids doing 60ft doubles period,I've turned all my doubles on my home track into single-tabletop combos..they should all be like this as far as I'm concerned..

Agreed. Doubles and triples are bad news for all the weekend heroes trying to emulate the pros. Sheer lunacy.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

good info already given above but i also believe that motocross should turn back to its roots in "natural" terrain as opposed to the almost super-cross style tracks these days. whats wrong with a nice big floater!!! they give just as much air and no risk of "not making it"... sorry to get off topic

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My friend i ride with as well as his wife are EMT's , and when we go to the track , usually someone needs assistance , and she is usually the first one there ,I have watched several times , and as mentioned , she checks to make sure the person is aware of where they are , and who they are , and if they remember what happened , she also has THEM do any moving , she will not move them , she wants to make sure THEY are capable of controlling their movements , it not only tells her if something is broken (by them flinching) , but it puts no added strain to the person , she trys to get them as mentioned on their back , and then does a evaluation , GENTLY touching extremities to see if the person response shows signs of discomfort or pain , if they do respond she tries to investigate further to see if it is a break , or other injury that would require medical attention , so far (seen some bad get-offs) all have been able to get up , some requiring assistance , one requiring a trip to the hospital with a broken femur , ribs and collarbone *all in one wreck* , jumping a 100' table and bouncing after flat landing past the jump **she was standing right there at the time**, but what i have taken from this (and having a serious street bike wreck in the 80's getting hit by a car at 50 mph) , is DO NOT MOVE THE PERSON , ASK them if they can move something , but dont grab them and try to pick them up , or move their arms,legs or anything else that could cause permanent damage , let them move under their own power so they can control the movement themselves

I am not trained in Emergency assistance , , this is just what i have either experienced myself or witnessed as the proper procedure

This is the video of her working on the guy i mentioned , does not show much but you can see how far past the jump he landed

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nEMlqmIKJ3M&feature=youtu.be

Edited by 450XJimDirt

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I will let the professionals give the full answer, but the golden rule is "do no more harm", can they breath, is there a pulse!!!

There would be no reason to remove the helmet unless there was an airway obstruction and the patient is going to die if you don't remove the helmet and clear the mouth/airway...

I suggest you take a 1st aid course...

I agree totally. If nothing else, just keep them alert and talking as to not go into shock. JMO

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
good info already given above but i also believe that motocross should turn back to its roots in "natural" terrain as opposed to the almost super-cross style tracks these days. whats wrong with a nice big floater!!! they give just as much air and no risk of "not making it"... sorry to get off topic

Well said! I couldn't agree more!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I agree totally. If nothing else, just keep them alert and talking as to not go into shock. JMO

There is little you can do to prevent someone going into shock. There are multiple types of shock and most caused by injury are hypovolemic shock, when the body loses too much fluid (blood). So unless you can start them on some normal saline or blood you cant do much. Talking isn't going to increase their body fluids. I think this is a common misunderstanding so I would just like everyone to know what shock actually is.

Shock

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Shock_%28circulatory%29

What many people consider "shock"

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Acute_stress_reaction

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Just do a quick assessment if they had a bad crash. Remember your abc's

A-airway -Do they have an airway or is it obstructed by something or collapsed?

B-breathing -Are they breathing, if so what is there respiratory rate? Normal, slow, fast?

C- consciousness- Are the alert and oriented x3? (person, place, and time)

Your not really suppose to find a pulse according to the new guidelines for cpr, due to the fact many people will have difficulty finding one if you don't do it daily. The time wasted searching for a pulse could be spent starting cpr. The quicker you can start cpr the better.

After you check for the abc's check if they can move their extremities.

Ask them to tell you where the pain is coming from. If it was something that your not sure is a serious injury I would call 911 because it is always better to be safe then sorry. Many people that come in to the hospital via ambulance often aren't that seriously hurt and its more of a precaution.

According to NYS protocol, most wrecks on an MX track would lead to a Cervical collar and spine board due to the mechanism of injury. But it's just not practical in every scenario.

What 79yamdt said is good stuff. The only way a helmet is coming off right away is if the rider is not breathing.

After the ABC's and if rider is conscious and alert, ask the rider if they can feel each extremity. If they can, can they wiggle the fingers and toes? This will somewhat rule out C-spine injuries AS THEY LIE.

If you did not see them go down, you really have no idea what the potential for C-spine injury is, so let them slowly assess themselves and make them advise on pain from toe to head.

If something is obviously broken and there is no sensation or movement, or there is sustained difficulty breathing, or rider is not responsive, call 911.

My $.02

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Just do a quick assessment if they had a bad crash. Remember your abc's

A-airway -Do they have an airway or is it obstructed by something or collapsed?

B-breathing -Are they breathing, if so what is there respiratory rate? Normal, slow, fast?

C- consciousness- Are the alert and oriented x3? (person, place, and time)

Your not really suppose to find a pulse according to the new guidelines for cpr, due to the fact many people will have difficulty finding one if you don't do it daily. The time wasted searching for a pulse could be spent starting cpr. The quicker you can start cpr the better.

After you check for the abc's check if they can move their extremities.

Ask them to tell you where the pain is coming from. If it was something that your not sure is a serious injury I would call 911 because it is always better to be safe then sorry. Many people that come in to the hospital via ambulance often aren't that seriously hurt and its more of a precaution.

A - Airway

B- Breathing

C- Circulation

The best thing anyone can do is take a first aid class. Ask your instructor for training in a rider crash scenario. There is some good info here but there is no substitute for proper instruction and training.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
A - Airway

B- Breathing

C- Circulation

The best thing anyone can do is take a first aid class. Ask your instructor for training in a rider crash scenario. There is some good info here but there is no substitute for proper instruction and training.

I'm an idiot and had a massive brain fart.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I think some of the tracks should add a safety course demo when they have demo days or make an event out of it. Or a transworld tip/article. Most of us wing it, but I def want to more prepared.

The point whether double or table doesn't apply. Something could happen anywhere on a track or trail. I just need the most advice I can have to prepare for any event that someone has experienced.

Just put my son's close one on his site taylorsmx.com. He said his bike quit on him right at the top of the face. That's twice it's happened on different parts of a track so I have to get that straightened out. The double he could've made but I think he lost his tire and got sideways. Saw that one happen as well. Nothing like seeing your son's bike flip several times.

The more info the better.....for all of us. Keep it coming.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I agree with the "return to natural terrain" comment above. I don't do any jump I can't see over... no long jumps, no crazy stuff. And I still got hurt really bad last Oct. ... Broke 9 ribs in a bad crash on the trail. When I didn't show up at the stop, my riding buddy came back for me. I had already removed my helmet, some gear, and was catching my breath when he showed up. I got him to remove my chest protector because it was putting pressure on some of the ribs. Then he went after "The Calvery".

Last month at a local track, a kid died while trying to do a long table top. He endoed forward and landed on his face. The last thing we think about is getting hurt, let alone dieing. But this is a dangerous sport. Its dynamic which makes it fun. Sometimes things happen we don't anticipate. You get too close to the guy next to you, or the dust obscures your vision, or the roost catches you on the knuckle /knee/chin.... and wham you go down.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Just do a quick assessment if they had a bad crash. Remember your abc's

A-airway -Do they have an airway or is it obstructed by something or collapsed?

B-breathing -Are they breathing, if so what is there respiratory rate? Normal, slow, fast?

C- circulation- Pulse? do they have one and what is it?

Also check level of consciousness. Are they alert to where they are, what the date/time is, and who they are.

Your not really suppose to find a pulse according to the new guidelines for cpr, due to the fact many people will have difficulty finding one if you don't do it daily. The time wasted searching for a pulse could be spent starting cpr. The quicker you can start cpr the better.

After you check for the abc's check if they can move their extremities.

Ask them to tell you where the pain is coming from. If it was something that your not sure is a serious injury I would call 911 because it is always better to be safe then sorry. Many people that come in to the hospital via ambulance often aren't that seriously hurt and its more of a precaution.

I think this particular issue applies to all, be it mx track or woods riders. I carry several 'space blankets' in my pack. They weigh next to nothing and be utilized for host of things, in a pinch. The primary use of course is to maintain body temp.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Great info in this thread. Bottom line : if you are not sure, dont move them! I keep an old cell phone with me when i ride. Every old cell phone must be able to call 911 even when you cant use it as part of your plan, so its perfect for emergencies. I just keep it in a plastic bag on the bars. Evrybody ( just about) has at least one laying around.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Reply with:

Sign in to follow this  

×