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96 XR200r timing, should oil be seen spitting out timing site hole?

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I have a 96 xr200 and was attempting to set the timing on it. After i warmed it up and removed the top plug out of the stator cover, when i started it, there seemed to be what i feel an excessive amount of oil spitting out the site hole. Should there be pressure and oil on the stator side or do i have something going on that i need to pull apart more to see. I was checking the timing because i have a slight bog on slight tip in that can only be felt when under load. Seems to be ok at idle when revving up, but when you just crack the throttle it bogs at first then accelerates ok. Starts fine. Any insight would be greatly appreciated.

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No worries about oil in there - it is probably sloshing out. I am thinking your '96 should be CDI so it should not need any timing checks but if you must you can do it with the engine off.

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Its normal to get oil in your eye trying to check timing. Leaning the bike over helps.

If the timing is off check the mechanical advance springs and weights to be sure they move freely and ajust the timing chain tension before you start adjusting it.

Check and clean the carb.. Most bog problems are carb problems.

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The XR200 CDI system is just a replacement for points, so the same timing issues that points have still apply. The CDI sensor is driven by the cam and there is a mechanical advance mechanism left over from the points. A lot of other Honda models use a sensor on the crank and the ignition advance is in the CDI black box rather than mechanical. So timing checks are still require because cam chains stretch and advance mechanisms have failures.

During one timing exercise I noticed that the timing light showed the Advancer and Sensor marks lined up at all rpms that I checked, and that Timing Light timing matched static timing. So I decided to avoid all of the splashing oil everywhere and do static timing.

When checking ignition timing always turn the crank forward (running direction) towards the marks to replicate engine running condition.

Ignition timing; pull the plug and turn the engine to TDC firing with the "F" mark on the flywheel aligned to the mark on the case. TDC Firing is when the advancer aligns with the CDI sensor. Adjust the sensor plate so that the line on the Advancer aligns with the line on the Sensor..

While you're there you can check total advance by moving the flywheel CW back past the double marks, and then rotate CCW to the marks; the left mark is 32 degrees and the right mark is 28 degrees. Twist the advancer CCW and check the alignment between the advancer and the sensor. For a new engine I think you should limit total advance to 28 degrees, which is the right mark.

Edited by chuck4788

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