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Tips Please!! Starting Motocross

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Hi Guys :bonk:

okay well i want to start racing motocross and here is my sitch...

Im 16, 17 soon.

im 5 foot 7-10 (not sure exactly)

weigh 52.5kg (yes im skinny)

im getting a 2004 KTM SX 125 tomorrow, this will be my first real bike.

ive riding before on a cr125 for a day.

i dont want to start straight away as im not confident about riding fast, doing jumps, and the rest.

anything that helped you learn to

Jump?

Corner?

Make holeshot?

I want to know what would help to make me be ready faster, obviously practise but what?

i want to start in a year or so.

anything i should learn in that time, like mechanics or anything??

I will be paying for it all myself as my Mum doesnt want me to even have a bike let anlone race but she can suck a pickle :smirk:

So what should i buy before i start racing?

or do to my bike to make it better for me?

Any Help will be awesome

Thanks Kurt!

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use the search tool, start with cornering and rut threads. If the bike comes with a manual set the sag and put the clickers back to stock. When your first starting out the most beneficial thing is going to be seat time with knowledge of proper technique. The first few times you go to the track i doubt you will even need to focus much on technique as you will be focused on just getting around the track. Don't start any bad habits. Exercise, bike maintenance, probably getting a job will all be learned/started as they are needed. If you are having trouble in a particular discipline, have someone video you and post it on here. You will be practice riding fast and being able to do it for the length of the race. Quality helmet and boots and you should be well on your way.

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use the search tool, start with cornering and rut threads. If the bike comes with a manual set the sag and put the clickers back to stock. When your first starting out the most beneficial thing is going to be seat time with knowledge of proper technique. The first few times you go to the track i doubt you will even need to focus much on technique as you will be focused on just getting around the track. Don't start any bad habits. Exercise, bike maintenance, probably getting a job will all be learned/started as they are needed. If you are having trouble in a particular discipline, have someone video you and post it on here. You will be practice riding fast and being able to do it for the length of the race. Quality helmet and boots and you should be well on your way.

This is good advise. Roll slowly around the track a few times and work on getting comfortable/tuning your suspension a little. Practice cornering first and the rest will come as you learn to hold speed through the turns. You won't be practicing long if you don't get GOOD protective gear (and wear it) and once you get confident it's ok to push yourself a bit but just keep in mind it is easy to ride above your head if you get cocky. Not a good thing so just try to keep a level head. And one last thing, if you're tired CALL IT QUITS! Most often that one last lap/session is the one to cause an injury NOT WORTH IT!

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At your age, I think the biggest thing is to have a parent's approval of you riding motocross. If you're riding to defy your parents, thats not going to make you a good rider as you'll be riding for the wrong reasons. Also, when you get hurt, you don't want your parents to tighten the reigns on you any further.

Like anything, practice makes perfect and motocross is no exception. The catch with motocross, unlike many other sports is, when you make a simple mistake, the results can be catastrophic. So the key is, learn properly from the beginning and develop a good skill foundation before hitting the track.

I highly suggest education right at the beginning because if you're trained properly early on, you will have an easier time moving forward in later years. Shane Watt's is an Australian riding coach, I would look him up and see if you can purchase some of his DVD's. He has tuns of skills you can practice in your back yard, which I feel are critical to becoming a better rider. If you can learn those skills early on, you will feel more comfortable on the track and probably pick up track riding quicker then most people.

At the beginner through expert level of riding/racing, the rider is 85% and the bike is 15%. Yes, having a decent setup bike with suspension that doesn't bottom out, with the proper spring rates and sag set, those will help you gain confidence quickly, but you don't need to spend any money on the bike otherwise. That lil 04 KTM 125 is a great bike, gobs of power and lots of fun, so you're in good hands already. Learning your bike is a good idea, if you can dig up a user manual, I highly suggest reading through it. You will learn about oil pre-mixing, spark plug replacement, sprocket maintenance, tire management, brake pad replacement and how to get your bike apart. These are all critical things and knowing your bike is VERY important so you can fix it quick.

Getting the right gear is critical, a high quality helmet and boots are critical, as when you crash, those are the two pieces of protective gear that will help you a great deal. I wear knee braces a roost guard and a leatt brace as well. The knee braces will help you pinch the bike, they also obviously help in an accident so your knee doesn't blow out. The roost guard is important because if the bike lands on top of you, the last thing you want is a foot peg hitting your stomach. The Leatt brace (or any other neck brace) helps keep your upper back from getting injured. I've had lots of bad accidents that I've literally walked away from, because of my safety gear and I recommend anyone who rides, at least attempt to own the right stuff.

I suggest first going to the local track without a bike and just hanging out. Meet people, watch how others ride, see what happens when the crash, things of that nature. Understanding the world of motocross first, before taking the plunge yourself. Track etiquette is also important, that is something that you can see and ask about. There is a lot you can learn from just being there and asking questions/watching other people.

Once you've learned your bike and understand some of the basic skills, its time to take it to the track. My suggestion is to hit the track at a time/day where its not so busy. Obviously during racer practice or a race, is probably not the best time to learn how to ride. Many tracks are open to the general public during the weekend and finding that time to practice is critical. Racing itself, should probably be the last thing on your mind. It will take you a while to become proficient enough to race. Patience is a virtue in motocross, so take your time, it can take years of riding to become proficient enough for competitive racing. The last thing you wanna do is go out there and get hurt, that will set you back and the more setbacks you have, the longer it will take you to become a better rider.

Finally, there are many discussions about basic skills here on thumpertalk. I would do a search and go through the threads here about individual topics that interest you. But be forewarned, just because you understand a subject, doesn't mean you know what it looks like or how to do it on track. So take your time, get help at the track from other riders and practice makes perfect.

Edited by tye1138

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If you can, just find a good local pro, check out local racing organizations board and ask around about who a good teacher is, take a few lessons before you have bad habits that are hard to break. Proper body positioning, bike set up, make huge differences in how you ride, how long you will be able to ride and being confident & safe to be honest. There are so many tips that you will confuse yourself right now, just go learn how to ride the bike, get some lessons, after that seat time seat time seat time. cant say it enough, it just comes with riding & getting comfortable on your bike.

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okay thanks for that guys, really appreciate it :smirk:

x2! I just read through all these and now I'm looking for some DVD's :bonk:

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Once you ride around the track your first time reality should set in pretty well about your "racing" career. I'm not saying that to try and put you down at all but every year, heck every week, there is a new kid that says they're going to be racing before they've even ridden a bike, let alone the track.

I just think that you should first concentrate on becoming a normal rider, meaning able to ride the track at a faster than slow speed along with completely learning your manual and learning how to do every bit of maintenance on that bike, much less being able to afford to take care of it the right way. I think your 1 year goal this will be far more realistic. I'm guessing mum won't be helping with bike expenses. I'm 25, work full time, and ride. That's all I do, and even I can barely keep up with keeping up with the bike maintenance wise, rebuilding the entire bike, buying gear ($300 boots), plus gas/oil for the bike and gas for the truck to get to and from the track PLUS track fees.

I guess my point is, this is a big boy sport mate. If you're even half way serious about racing you should be dead serious about all the above mentioned things and don't be afraid to lower your expectations or push that date back. Don't compare yourselves to other riders, compare yourself to yourself. Don't ride over your head or past your limit. That's when you get injured bad.

Good luck and I hope you all the best. You've come to the right place for all sorts of knowledge. One last bit of advise I can give is a lot of the bonuses in life come from "who you know" so reach out to people at the track or just wherever in general. Make connections. I can't even begin to explain how crucial a good set of riding buddies is. I think that without some good riding buddies you'll never be able to get better, period. For example, I met a guy at the dealership bought some of his boots and we've become good friends. He's gonna help me rebuild my top end @ no charge. This will be my first top end rebuild so without him this would be impossible and definitely more expensive. Just holler if you have any questions.

Griffin

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Once you ride around the track your first time reality should set in pretty well about your "racing" career. I'm not saying that to try and put you down at all but every year, heck every week, there is a new kid that says they're going to be racing before they've even ridden a bike, let alone the track.

I just think that you should first concentrate on becoming a normal rider, meaning able to ride the track at a faster than slow speed along with completely learning your manual and learning how to do every bit of maintenance on that bike, much less being able to afford to take care of it the right way. I think your 1 year goal this will be far more realistic. I'm guessing mum won't be helping with bike expenses. I'm 25, work full time, and ride. That's all I do, and even I can barely keep up with keeping up with the bike maintenance wise, rebuilding the entire bike, buying gear ($300 boots), plus gas/oil for the bike and gas for the truck to get to and from the track PLUS track fees.

I guess my point is, this is a big boy sport mate. If you're even half way serious about racing you should be dead serious about all the above mentioned things and don't be afraid to lower your expectations or push that date back. Don't compare yourselves to other riders, compare yourself to yourself. Don't ride over your head or past your limit. That's when you get injured bad.

Good luck and I hope you all the best. You've come to the right place for all sorts of knowledge. One last bit of advise I can give is a lot of the bonuses in life come from "who you know" so reach out to people at the track or just wherever in general. Make connections. I can't even begin to explain how crucial a good set of riding buddies is. I think that without some good riding buddies you'll never be able to get better, period. For example, I met a guy at the dealership bought some of his boots and we've become good friends. He's gonna help me rebuild my top end @ no charge. This will be my first top end rebuild so without him this would be impossible and definitely more expensive. Just holler if you have any questions.

Griffin

Thanks man, i will keep all that in my head :bonk:

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Definitely do! Make yourself a list of routine maintenance every single time you ride such as chain/air filter/tire pressure/lubing throttle cables/etc. your manual will tell you exactly and then every 3 rides I change my gear oil religiously. I just say this because just taking care of the bike and buying all of the lubricants, oils, grease, wd40, and cleaning supplies is a hefty little bill in itself, but it is by far the best thing you can do to. Especially learning it @ a young age. Most serious racer kids parents do EVERYTHING for them and I think that is kind of BS. You've got to be strong in all areas to be serious about racing.

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Hi Guys :smirk:

okay well i want to start racing motocross and here is my sitch...

Im 16, 17 soon.

im 5 foot 7-10 (not sure exactly)

weigh 52.5kg (yes im skinny)

im getting a 2004 KTM SX 125 tomorrow, this will be my first real bike.

ive riding before on a cr125 for a day.

i dont want to start straight away as im not confident about riding fast, doing jumps, and the rest.

anything that helped you learn to

Jump?

Corner?

Make holeshot?

I want to know what would help to make me be ready faster, obviously practise but what?

i want to start in a year or so.

anything i should learn in that time, like mechanics or anything??

I will be paying for it all myself as my Mum doesnt want me to even have a bike let anlone race but she can suck a pickle :banana:

So what should i buy before i start racing?

or do to my bike to make it better for me?

Any Help will be awesome

Thanks Kurt!

Ok, for starters, You should go trail riding a few times. I know you didn't mention this, but trail riding will let you learn your bike much quicker than going straight to the track. You won't be freaking out from bumps, jump faces, or muddy ruts. The trails are more forgiving, and you don't have to worry about someone running into you. Once you get used to that, go and try out a beginner or peewee track (if big bikes are allowed on a peewee track) Ride it slow and DO NOT TRY TO JUMP for the first 2 laps. I recommend learning 3 things before trying a bigger track.

1. Learn the power band of your bike,. Learn how much power you have in each gear, and learn how to use the throttle without going into a wheelie, or stalling. If you have good throttle control and are NOT scared of the power of your bike, you will feel more confident. Believe me when I say doing anything on a motocross track on a 2 stroke is SCARY. It will seem like the bike is going to kill you if you don't know the power band and have good throttle control.

2. Learn to drift. Go at a slow speed on some loose dirt. turn left, then quickly turn your handlebars in the other direction while giving it a sudden surge of the throttle lean to the left and right side of your bike and use the throttle to control your angle. This sounds dangerous, but believe me, if you can drift, you won't be nearly as scared from sliding around at higher speeds, and you will have much better control.

3. Learn to jump something small. stay in the attack position, and accelerate smoothly off of jumps. Don't concentrate on any other jumping techniques. If you get comfortable doing the basic jumping technique on a full size track, you will be more confident on the fast bumps, and big jumps. Trust me, don't learn too much at once, because the rest will come when your ready.

If you can do thes simple things, you will be able to learn much faster, because the scariest part of turns is when you start to drift and big jumps will be scary if you don't know the basics.

Learn the power band of your bike, and get used to riding fast in a straight line. Pinning it in 3rd or 4th gear might seem scary, but you will be much faster if you know how it feels to go this fast. go through your gears up to 4th on a straight dirt path path until you feel comfortable with it. I used to think going 22-25 mph (in first gear) was scary, I got used to going 75 in a straight line, which made it easier to bring that speed to the track. Just forget about the vibration and loud screaming noise of your motorcycle. If you don't think too much about the loud hunk of metal below ur butt, it will become much easier.:bonk:

Have fun, and stay safe!

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Ok, for starters, You should go trail riding a few times. I know you didn't mention this, but trail riding will let you learn your bike much quicker than going straight to the track. You won't be freaking out from bumps, jump faces, or muddy ruts. The trails are more forgiving, and you don't have to worry about someone running into you. Once you get used to that, go and try out a beginner or peewee track (if big bikes are allowed on a peewee track) Ride it slow and DO NOT TRY TO JUMP for the first 2 laps. I recommend learning 3 things before trying a bigger track.

1. Learn the power band of your bike,. Learn how much power you have in each gear, and learn how to use the throttle without going into a wheelie, or stalling. If you have good throttle control and are NOT scared of the power of your bike, you will feel more confident. Believe me when I say doing anything on a motocross track on a 2 stroke is SCARY. It will seem like the bike is going to kill you if you don't know the power band and have good throttle control.

2. Learn to drift. Go at a slow speed on some loose dirt. turn left, then quickly turn your handlebars in the other direction while giving it a sudden surge of the throttle lean to the left and right side of your bike and use the throttle to control your angle. This sounds dangerous, but believe me, if you can drift, you won't be nearly as scared from sliding around at higher speeds, and you will have much better control.

3. Learn to jump something small. stay in the attack position, and accelerate smoothly off of jumps. Don't concentrate on any other jumping techniques. If you get comfortable doing the basic jumping technique on a full size track, you will be more confident on the fast bumps, and big jumps. Trust me, don't learn too much at once, because the rest will come when your ready.

If you can do thes simple things, you will be able to learn much faster, because the scariest part of turns is when you start to drift and big jumps will be scary if you don't know the basics.

Learn the power band of your bike, and get used to riding fast in a straight line. Pinning it in 3rd or 4th gear might seem scary, but you will be much faster if you know how it feels to go this fast. go through your gears up to 4th on a straight dirt path path until you feel comfortable with it. I used to think going 22-25 mph (in first gear) was scary, I got used to going 75 in a straight line, which made it easier to bring that speed to the track. Just forget about the vibration and loud screaming noise of your motorcycle. If you don't think too much about the loud hunk of metal below ur butt, it will become much easier.:bonk:

Have fun, and stay safe!

Thanks mate, really good advice :smirk:

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