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Land Use/Land Restriction and Basic Guide of Riding in The Baja

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It seems like Baja, especially in the north, is becoming a similar landscape to what San Diego has been experiencing over the past 30 years. Many more fences restrict access to once open trails and single track that have been established for decades. Farms are cropping up in areas where no one but dirt bikes used to pass through. I have been shocked at the large scale fencing in areas all over the place, along the coast and into the Sierra Juarez. We don't want Baja to turn into San Diego and everyone who spins a throttle in Baja plays a large part in this.

I know that this topic has been brought up before, but it needs discussion and help lend awareness for anyone that rides in Baja. When anyone rides in Baja, whether you are riding for the first time, or have ridden it for 50 years, the same level of respect and awareness must be had by all. Some might say that simple respect is all one needs, but this is Baja, so it is much more complicated than that. I would like to see ideas stated for what you should and should not do while riding public and private land, if you are so lucky. Our individual behavior will directly shape our Baja land use in the future.

There are a few obviously things that I will start with(Captain Obvious):

Slow down by ranch homes and farm animals

If a gate is locked, don't try to open the gate

Never think of cutting a fence.

Be friendly and respectful of the ranchers and the workers.

It's very simple... You blast through a ranch or small town? I can almost guarantee the people that dwell there will start think about restricting dirt bikes in their area. All ideas are appreciated.

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A few more simple things to help gain respect for off roaders:

- When you pass a car on a dirt road always accelerate early, stay left until well clear and then DO NOT roost 'em!

- Slow down or stop for livestock. Horses and cows are valuable and if you spook them into a fence or a ditch you just took a big chunk out of somebody's livelihood.

- Wet laundry. It's tough enough to wash clothes by hand, imagine how mad you'd be if someone roared by and left a big cloud of dust to roll over your wet clothes.

- Close the gate after you go through. Don't count on the last guy to do it, wait until he shows up and then he can get the next gate.

- Teach younger riders good trail manners and proper respect for local landowners.

- If you see a rider (or riders) doing something stupid or causing damage, call them on it. If you recognize someone in a YOUTUBE roosting around on private property, call them on it.

Let's keep this thread rolling in a positive direction, not just with common sense rules, but also with news about sensitive areas and notes about ways to help. :bonk:

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Mexican locals are some of the worst at breaking a lot of these tips. I can't tell you how many asswipes I've seen blasting down El Compadre road on their quads, blowing by Prieta's place or tearing up the coast near Erendira, just as an example. It's pretty telling how careless they might be elsewhere. No doubt there's plenty of American's equally careless, but it's a difficult challenge spreading this message amongst Mexican locals. Suggestions?

This one time, a guy cut his car in front of me and about a hundred other people in a long line in Ojos Negros and I called him out on it. Didn't end well. Be careful and tactful with your approach if you do happen to call someone out on reprehensible behavior :bonk: There's some serious testosterone down there.

Edited by Justin Hambleton

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New definition:

"call them on it..." = diplomatically point out the error of their ways or at least the potential damage to our sport. Always factor in size of your group and theirs, alcohol content (yours and theirs), and handy escape paths.

On a serious note, Justin has a good point here and we should always use common sense when potential conflicts come up.

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Good topic and good thoughts so far. Some ideas...

Always try to be an ambasador for the sport.

Respect all people and property.

Wave to people, be friendly.

Make some effort to TRY speaking some Spanish

Watch your dust around people, homes, crops, etc.

Obey even unofficial signs for speed etc.

Carry stickers and give them away, particularly to kids, make a friend! I've even given some to unprepared riders to go trade for things like Water from local spectators at B1K. Riding a dirt bike thru a small town in Mexico is likely as close as you'll ever become to being a RockStar, give away some stickers!

Another thread idea would be to share some common spanish words for Motorcycle 'Moto' things...

Edited by trooper8
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Another thread idea would be to share some common spanish words for Motorcycle 'Moto' things...

Perhaps those that aren't as challenged as I am with the Spanish language could add a few terms here besides my, 'Hola! Baja que lindo! Lo siento, no hablo enspagnol.' Terms that show you are friendly and care about Baja...

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-Where can I get beer? ------ > Donde venden cerveza?

-Where can I get gas? -------- > Donde venden gasolina?

There, with those 2 you can make it all the way to Cabo and back; unless you have an “issue”. In that case you could need food, oil, a tire repair shop, radiator water or (hopefully never) medical attention.

- Where is a store/market? ----------------------------- > Donde hay una tienda/mercado?

- Do you have oil for the engine /tranny? ------------- > Tienen aceite para motor/transmision?

- I’ve got a flat. ------------------------------------------ > Me ponche

- Where is a tire shop? ---------------------------------- > Donde hay una llantera?

- I need radiator water ---------------------------------- > Necesito agua para el radiador

- Where is a doctor / pharmacy ----------------------- > Donde hay un doctor / farmacia?

On a more specific situation, let’s say you are riding your dirt bike hit a rock and get a flat, then you’ll need to ask for a tube, patch kit, tire irons…

Parts:

• Bearing --------------------------------------- > Balero

• Carb ------------------------------------------ > Carburador

• Carb jet -------------------------------------- > Esprea

• Chain ----------------------------------------- > Cadena

Fender ---------------------------------------- > Guardafango

• Fuse ------------------------------------------- > Fusible

• Light bulb ------------------------------------- > Foco

• Master link ----------------------------------- > Candado para la cadena

Handlebar ------------------------------------ > Cuernos

• Hose ------------------------------------------ > Manguera

• Needle ---------------------------------------- > Aguja

• Rim ------------------------------------------- > Rin

• Shift / Brake / clutch levers ---------------- > Palanca de cambios / freno / clutch

• Spark plug ----------------------------------- > Bujia

• Spoke ---------------------------------------- > Rayo

• Tire ------------------------------------------- > Llanta

• Tube ------------------------------------------ > Tubo/cámara

• Tube valve ----------------------------------- > Pivote

• Voltage regulator ---------------------------- > Regulador de voltaje

Wheel ----------------------------------------- > Rueda

Tools:

• Allen wrench --------------------------------- > Llave ele

• Chain breaker ------------------------------- > Corta cadenas

• Pliers ----------------------------------------- > Pinzas

• Ratchet --------------------------------------- > Ratchet

• Screwdriver flat/Phillips --------------------- > Desarmador de paleta/estrella

• Socket ---------------------------------------- > Dado

• Spark plug socket --------------------------- > Saca bujia

• Tire irons ------------------------------------- > Espátulas / paletas para la llanta

• Vise grips ------------------------------------ > Pinzas perras

• Wrench --------------------------------------- > Llave

Miscellaneous:

• Duct tape --------------- > Tape gris “or” duct tape

• Electrical cable ----------> Cable electrico

• Electrical tape -----------> Tape negro

• J&B Weld ---------------- > Jota-be weld “or” soldadura liquida “or” pegamento epoxico

• Knife -------------------- > Navaja / cuchillo

• Safety wire ------------- > Alambre acerado

• TP ----------------------- > Papel higienico

• Zip ties------------------ > Cincho

• Do you have tubes for the bike? ---------- > Tienen tubos para la llanta de la moto?

• Where could I get it? ----------------------- > Donde lo podré conseguir?

• Do you have a patch kit? ------------------ > Tienen parches?

• Can I borrow tire irons? ------- > Me prestas las espátulas / paletas para las llantas?

Or a worst case scenario, your bike leaves you stranded in the middle of somewhere and you need to get someone to help you go get it. You’ll need to say if it is in a sandwash, in the top of a hill or in the middle of a meadow

• Creek ------------------------------------- > Arroyo

• Canyon ----------------------------------- > Cañon

• Fire road ------------------------ --------- > Camino revestido

• Hill ---------------------------------------- > Cerro

• Meadow ---------------------------------- > Prado

• Mud --------------------------------------- > Lodo

• Road -------------------------------------- > Camino

• Sandwash -------------------------------- > Arenal

• Silt bed ----------------------------------- > Talcal

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In a perfect world what we need to do is form a organization with stewards that can help educate and establish an ethic that will preserve the woods, desert, trails, farm land, of Baja rather than destroy them. These stewards could work with local farmers, ranchers, schools and even police to help educate and recognize the threats to property and establish the tools that will allow us all to enjoy riding Baja. That said it would be a full time job and most likely someone who lives in Nothern Baja.

For now Making a flyer to hand out a know places where everyone stops on rides might be a start.When I road Moab a few years ago they gave us a handout at the tourist center with the unofficial DOS and DONTS for the area. I know it helped me, since I had never riden in this area. One side could be english and the other en Espanol.

Edited by brett frederickson

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A cheap pack of mexican smokes goes a long way...a pint of Don Pedro will open almost any gate... Phrases????

Andamos perdidos!! = We are lost!! (make sure this is true though)

compa ya ni la chingas!! = hey buddy slow down, the ranchers get mad at the dust!!

For this last one I always have a smile on my fase and ready to hand a beer to the guy on the quad blasting sand...Of course this is after following all the good advise above.

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Land use/conservation signs are poping up in the San Felipe area (road to Morelia for example), along with the new roadside fencing along hwy5.

Morton I think suggested once that when you are on the ranchers land via open gates with apparent full access, to slowly approach the house helmet off and walk up to say hello and ask if there are any special conditions they would like you to observe. Of course some basic spanish would be in order.

mtz

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In a perfect world what we need to do is form a organization with stewards that can help educate and establish an ethic that will preserve the woods, desert, trails, farm land, of Baja rather than destroy them. These stewards could work with local farmers, ranchers, schools and even police to help educate and recognize the threats to property and establish the tools that will allow us all to enjoy riding Baja. That said it would be a full time job and most likely someone who lives in Nothern Baja.

For know Making a flyer to hand out a know places where everyone stops on rides might be a start.When I road Moab a few years ago they gave us a handout at the tourist center with the unofficial DOS and DONTS for the area. I know it helped me, since I had never riden in this area. One side could be english and the other en Espanol.

This would be a huge undertaking, no doubt. The Stewards of the Sequoias comes to mind here in CA as an example of what is possible...

http://www.stewardsofthesequoia.org/

Another small step on a long journey...

http://racersandranchers.org/

I like the flyer idea! Given out at such places like RSV?

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I think a flyer in both English and Spanish at Santa Veronica is a good idea. A poster with the same information would also be good. I think I can get the poster made if the group here can come up with a good, concise list. If we can get Racers & Ranchers involved they might pay for the flyer printing (Rudy & Lance - how about it?).:bonk:

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This thread is a good idea,Life in Baja is a trip,Life with Mexican vecinos is not like the states.Once you understand Estilo Mexicanos,than you know how to act.I wish I could write a book.All the info here is good for all riders,but to teach people here not to throw trash out the window.Thats hard I will keep trying.Keep up the good work.

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Good list Scotty. Thanks!

I am currently enrolled in "an immersion course" of sorts 'con una chica caliente'. I'm learnin' new words everyday. :bonk:

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Just an idea.

We make a flyer pdf form put in a sticky and any time someone goes riding in Baja they make a couple of copies and leave them in diffrent places

Ramonas

RSV

Mikes

Jamau

rice and beans

etc!!!

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Just an idea.

We make a flyer pdf form put in a sticky and any time someone goes riding in Baja they make a couple of copies and leave them in diffrent places

Ramonas

RSV

Mikes

Jamau

rice and beans

etc!!!

:bonk: Now to come up with something clear and to the point...

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Just an idea.

We make a flyer pdf form put in a sticky and any time someone goes riding in Baja they make a couple of copies and leave them in diffrent places

Ramonas

RSV

Mikes

Jamau

rice and beans

etc!!!

I'd suggest laminating them, otherwise they may not last. There are plenty of places they can be nailed to a post for eternity (Ramona's, Prieta's place on El Compadre, etc...). I'd hate to come across one wadded up on the ground somewhere. Having them permanently displayed would be cool and effective. Someone needs to come up with a fancy, straight-to-the-point logo and/or mascot with a catchy little tagline like Smokey the Bear or Woodsy the Owl. "Give a hoot, don't pollute." I vote for this 'lil guy. He says, "hey man - thumbs up, have fun, be safe, wear safety gear and most of all, make sure to coordinate your outfit!"

6517816015_2c7032f1a5_z.jpg

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Here's a first stab. This is very preliminary. This should be a group effort so feedback welcome. I picked what I thought were the top five "tips" to include. A couple of these satisfy a lot of problems (i.e. riding slow near ranches and saying hi). I didn't want the tips to be too preachy and more of a reminder of things people should be conscientious of... friendly, not off-putting. The idea of putting these in common places where off-roaders are most likely to congregate is a great idea, but I think it would be effective to associate these basic rules with a logo or simple message of sorts that we can spread throughout Baja (like my earlier examples of Woodsy the Owl or the "Keep Tahoe Blue" logo). This logo and simple message should remind off-roaders of the larger responsibilities we've outlined here. I came up with the slogan "say hi to baja" a couple years ago. Sorta kills two birds with one... slogan: visit baja and make sure to wave. Maybe it's cheesy, maybe not. You're opinions welcome...

Anyway, this is very bland and basic at the moment. I can spice this up a bit. There would also be a Spanish version, once the basic content is solidified.

6518650149_2274a23055_b.jpg

Edited by Justin Hambleton

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