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gpr vs scotts stablizers

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This thread has the potential to be several pages long with people arguing over which which one is better. I have had a couple of both, and I like the Scotts better because it doesn't dampen back to center, and you can adjust the low speed circuit separately from the high speed circuit. This means I can adjust the low speed down so it can hardly be felt while riding smooth trails, but when it gets rough and rocky it does it's job (higher speed bar movements). The GPR doesn't do this. If you want a lot of damping with the GPR you have no choice but to have steering resistance.

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This thread has the potential to be several pages long with people arguing over which which one is better. I have had a couple of both, and I like the Scotts better because it doesn't dampen back to center, and you can adjust the low speed circuit separately from the high speed circuit. This means I can adjust the low speed down so it can hardly be felt while riding smooth trails, but when it gets rough and rocky it does it's job (higher speed bar movements). The GPR doesn't do this. If you want a lot of damping with the GPR you have no choice but to have steering resistance.

 

That's exactly why I prefer the Scott's.  The high speed adjustment is the real reason for having a stabilizer.

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When I was looking for one, I did a lot of research, and reading. Scotts and WER were the ones to go for is what I found. I ended up with a WER.

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I have a GPR on my KTM 525 and my wife has a Scotts on her Husky TE450, I personally like dampening both ways in situations like ruts and roots, for narrow twisty trails, I set my GPR at 3 1/2 and forget about it and it does the job well, when we swap bikes, I like the Scotts for its performance and the way it works, so the question to the stabilizer makers is, why haven't they made a stabilizer  that can do both all on one unit, I do understand there would be more circuitry, perhaps the unit would be too big or heavy, but if somebody came up with an all in one fully adjustable stabilizer, I would be all over it.

 

Eric@ScottsPerfomance, chime in on this if you can.

 

But before you get a steering stabilizer, setup your suspension first, if you don't, you are just masking a problem. 

Edited by sickpuppy
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I ran gpr for years and I always blew the seals on it, had to be serviced every year. The Scott's has not leaked at all with the same riding conditions.

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I did a desert race a few weeks ago and trail rode my bike before that with the scotts on it. Bike has over 1000 miles on it with the Scotts and not 1 issue to complain about it. 

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I have a GPR on my KTM 525 and my wife has a Scotts on her Husky TE450, I personally like dampening both ways in situations like ruts and roots, for narrow twisty trails, I set my GPR at 3 1/2 and forget about it and it does the job well, when we swap bikes, I like the Scotts for its performance and the way it works, so the question to the stabilizer makers is, why haven't they made a stabilizer  that can do both all on one unit, I do understand there would be more circuitry, perhaps the unit would be too big or heavy, but if somebody came up with an all in one fully adjustable stabilizer, I would be all over it.

 

Eric@ScottsPerfomance, chime in on this if you can.

 

But before you get a steering stabilizer, setup your suspension first, if you don't, you are just masking a problem. 

Cost is the main reason. To be honest my machinist has said if we make a damper similar with out the high speed vale and sweep adjustments similar to some of our competitor's he could easily nock off $50-$75 bucks off the unit. If we added the ability to switch back and forth to on the rebound damping (which is something we have looked at) it will add to the cost and complexity of the unit. You would be amazed at how many people have the sweeps alone adjusted wrong because the either don't read or cant understand the instructions we provide.  I believe the Fastway/ Pro Moto Billet System 5 damper has that option but it is a more expensive damper compared to our and their own System 3 damper that does not have that feature.

 Thanks- Eric

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When I was looking for one, I did a lot of research, and reading. Scotts and WER were the ones to go for is what I found. I ended up with a WER.

 

How did you like the WER??  I don't know much about them.. just that the Scott's is better than GPR in every respect, especially the high speed adjustment (which has saved me from 6th gear over-the-bars head-diggers in the past).

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I have a Scotts and they have my business for life. Fantastic product and their customer service is better than anyone I have ever dealt with in this industry. I bought an old unit used that needed a few parts and they treated me like it came off their assembly line yesterday. How do you go wrong?

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How did you like the WER??  I don't know much about them.. just that the Scott's is better than GPR in every respect, especially the high speed adjustment (which has saved me from 6th gear over-the-bars head-diggers in the past).

I have no complaints about the WER. It may not look all fancy, and polished like the others, but it works! I'm unaware that it's even there, until I whack a tree with my bars

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