Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  

DIY Steady Cam for Sngle Tack

Recommended Posts

+1

Would be great to see an pic of the actual mount. I always like trying different camera angles when riding, and this is now my favourite angle, the cam at the rear facing forwards.

Have you had any problems snagging the rig on branches? Or does it not interfere with your riding that much?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Looks really good. I've got to give this a try! I'd love to see a mount pic, too!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

FrontMount.jpg

RearMount.jpg

Basically, there are two separate helmets, a front mount and a rear mount. Both use the same design concept.

I purchased the pole from the local Hardware store. (It's an extension for a paint roller). It's thin walled and super lightweight. It is held in a C-Channel using Zip Ties as shown in the picture. The distance between the Zip Ties dictates the amount of force needed to break free. You want enough strength to not break free during your ride, but it should break free if you hit a branch or wipeout. The C-Channel holds it steady while you are riding. A counterweight is used for balance.

I found that the C-Channel must be attached to the helmet as rigidly as possible. You don't want the system to flex if you hit something, you want all of the impact to lift the pole out of the C-Channel since this is what breaks the Zip Ties.

I know it looks ghetto, but I tried Velcro, plastic bolts, magnets and various tapes. In the end, the zip ties and a C-Channel were the most reliable break away. I tested it repeatedly before I fired up the bike.

Please remember, SAFETY THIRD.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
FrontMount.jpg

RearMount.jpg

Basically, there are two separate helmets, a front mount and a rear mount. Both use the same design concept.

I purchased the pole from the local Hardware store. (It's an extension for a paint roller). It's thin walled and super lightweight. It is held in a C-Channel using Zip Ties as shown in the picture. The distance between the Zip Ties dictates the amount of force needed to break free. You want enough strength to not break free during your ride, but it should break free if you hit a branch or wipeout. The C-Channel holds it steady while you are riding. A counterweight is used for balance.

I found that the C-Channel must be attached to the helmet as rigidly as possible. You don't want the system to flex if you hit something, you want all of the impact to lift the pole out of the C-Channel since this is what breaks the Zip Ties.

I know it looks ghetto, but I tried Velcro, plastic bolts, magnets and various tapes. In the end, the zip ties and a C-Channel were the most reliable break away. I tested it repeatedly before I fired up the bike.

Please remember, SAFETY THIRD.

:bonk:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It may look a bit redneck engineered , but the video it gives is pretty awesome , i will give you points for creativity !!

Questions: , i would take it you were not able to turn your head while riding and had to be constantly aware of your surroundings and make a conscious effort to NOT look around while riding , as that would have led to the boom hitting the tree's or whatever was off to the side , correct ??

What is the actual length to the camera from the center of the helmet ?? , and is the length the same with both front and rear view ??

And how much weight was needed for a counter weight ?? , and what happened when you tried it without the weight ??

and finally , how many times did you have to adjust the camera angle to get the view so you couldn't see the pipe ??

I have to admit this is one of the coolest views i have seen , its like having a ghost rider filming for you !!

Edited by 450XJimDirt

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Head turning is definitely risky through the trees.

Without the counterweight, the helmet would not sit level. In fact, you really need to fine tune the balance in order to be able to ride with this setup. The amount of counterweight used is dependant on how far out you place it. As you can see from the pics, I placed the weights out about a foot or so. This gave me a relatively light setup. My first try, I taped the weights directly to the helmet and by the time it was balanced, it felt like it weighed a ton.

If you are going to build one of these, here are some tips for riding with it.

1) Buy Insurance

2) Give the wife and kids a extra big hug before heading out.

3) Relax and try to pretend that the danger is not real.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

A suggestion for the next iteration - if there was a way you could put the rear camera following you off to the side a bit it would give a much more enjoyable to watch view. It was cool seeing the rear shot, but the novelty wore off quickly due to not being able to see the trail or anything in front of you coming up. If you could position the camera a few degrees off to the side looking forward, it would definitely improve that position. Though now that you've described the mount, it would likely be difficult to set up and dangerous to ride with.

And lastly a request...I'd love to see a 110ft Triple/Table with a gnarly whip with that rear position view!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Wow, you really went to town on those helmets! Might be a little permanent for me, but now I'm wondering about a gyro stabilized setup to mount on the rear fender... Problem is you'd get the mount in the view, unlike your head mount, unless you worked some different camera angles. The nice thing is it would get all that weight off your head, and you could actually turn your head!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Very nice job dude! A little difficult to ride with, but what awesome shots you got! Keep it up!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  

×