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what good is a cert of origin?

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I just picked up an 82 yz that came with cert of origin. If I ever sell the bike, do I need to sign it. It is in original dealers name only. Is it solely for proof of ownership?

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I don't know that it is any good unless you send it off to the state and have a title created. Some states don't title dirtbikes anyway.

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Yup, certificate of origin (sometimes referred to as an MSO) is needed to get the bike titled the first time when it's bought new.

Being an '82, I'd say it's a little late for that.:bonk:

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Having the cert of origin in your possession proves you rightfully own the bike if it is ever stolen, then recovered by the authorities.

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Having the cert of origin in your possession proves you rightfully own the bike if it is ever stolen, then recovered by the authorities.

Definitely Worthwhile to keep(locked up). In Washington state, A lot of new trailers are sold with that type of paperwork. It's used as a proof of purchase. Depending on where you live, you may actually need that document to title the bike in your name. It actually can be considered an item of significant value to a collecter of vintage bikes. I'd hold on to it.

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Having the cert of origin in your possession proves you rightfully own the bike if it is ever stolen, then recovered by the authorities.

If it's originally made out to you.. maybe. If, after almost 30 years, it has someone else's name on it, or is still in the dealership's name (as in this case), it's just fancy toilet paper.

To the OP.. Take it to your DMV and see what they say, every state is different in their requirements. But I'd bet they'll tell you something along the same line. I can't remember what all I had to have to title my street bikes (last one was the Busa, 4 years ago), but the MSO was only one of several items of paperwork needed here in Missouri to title a new bike the first time.

On a bike that old, I wouldn't even worry about it. Get a bill of sale from the person you bought it from, and ride it. Resell it the same way.

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Definitely Worthwhile to keep(locked up). In Washington state, A lot of new trailers are sold with that type of paperwork. It's used as a proof of purchase. Depending on where you live, you may actually need that document to title the bike in your name. It actually can be considered an item of significant value to a collecter of vintage bikes. I'd hold on to it.

Here in Missouri you turn it over to the DMV when you title your new bike the first time. You don't keep it, and never need it again as it is replaced with the title.

As I said.. every state is different.

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oddly enough the bike doesnt have a 16 digit vin, only something like 9 numbers. And it states "illegal for use on public roads", so I wont even waste my time on line @ the dmv-thanks all

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If it's originally made out to you.. maybe. If, after almost 30 years, it has someone else's name on it, or is still in the dealership's name (as in this case), it's just fancy toilet paper.

That's not the case at all. Having an MSO in your possession will get you your bike back if it's stolen and recovered. A bill of sale is worthless in that scenario. An MSO is compelling evidence that the bike is actually yours, especially if it is 30 years old.

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In CA, you can take the MSO to the DMV and get a title, even if the bike is not new. A lot of team race bikes hit the market with MSOs, never having been registered. I bought one myself a few years ago and had no trouble getting the title.

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That's not the case at all. Having an MSO in your possession will get you your bike back if it's stolen and recovered. A bill of sale is worthless in that scenario. An MSO is compelling evidence that the bike is actually yours, especially if it is 30 years old.

Might work that way in Texas, but not here in Missouri. Like I said before, here you up the MSO when you get you register your new bike the first time, and it is replaced with your title. If it's over 30 days old, it is only good to show that you didn't register your bike in the given time and are now subject to penalty.

If the bike gets stolen in the first month of ownership, the MSO, along with the dealership bill of sale (and there's another item or 2 of paperwork that is needed here too, but I can't remember for sure what it is called) will work as proof of ownership. But with only an out of date MSO, you'll have to pay all the penalties, sales taxes, register the bike, and pay any and all storage fees to the police, before you have any hope of them giving it back.

Once again.. Every state is different, and it pays to be familiar with the laws in YOUR state.

Little side note.. Buddy of mine bought a new WR250F back in '07. Decided he'd be smart and not register it to keep from having to pay the taxes and fees. Year went by, no problems. Then one day he got a letter from the Missouri DMV notifying him that he had X amount of days to pay all taxes, fees, penalties, and register the bike or they were going to confiscate the license plates on ALL of his vehicles. :bonk:

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I just picked up an 82 yz that came with cert of origin. If I ever sell the bike, do I need to sign it. It is in original dealers name only. Is it solely for proof of ownership?

Having the COO would indicate to me that the bike was never stolen. Reason being, if someone stole the bike from a truck/garage/etc., the chances the theif would be also be able to successfully find this document that is most certainly nowhere near the bike are very slim.

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In CA, you can take the MSO to the DMV and get a title, even if the bike is not new. A lot of team race bikes hit the market with MSOs, never having been registered. I bought one myself a few years ago and had no trouble getting the title.

Those are probably still floor planned dealership/factory bikes. Even though they are "used", they are treated like they would be if they were new leftover models still setting on the showroom floor.

Good enough for something 1, 2, or 3 years old, but in the OP's case, 30 years might be considered a questionable amount of time for a bike to set on the showroom floor.:bonk:

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Might work that way in Texas, but not here in Missouri. Like I said before, here you up the MSO when you get you register your new bike the first time, and it is replaced with your title. If it's over 30 days old, it is only good to show that you didn't register your bike in the given time and are now subject to penalty.

If the bike gets stolen in the first month of ownership, the MSO, along with the dealership bill of sale (and there's another item or 2 of paperwork that is needed here too, but I can't remember for sure what it is called) will work as proof of ownership. But with only an out of date MSO, you'll have to pay all the penalties, sales taxes, register the bike, and pay any and all storage fees to the police, before you have any hope of them giving it back.

Once again.. Every state is different, and it pays to be familiar with the laws in YOUR state.

My best friend had his CR250 stolen out of the back of my truck. He bought this bike from his employer, whom had the MSO but only gave my buddy a bill of sale. The cops found the bike but would not give it back with just a bill of sale. When he finally produced the MSO, they gave him his bike.

BTW, if you have farm/ranch land in Texas, you can buy dirt bikes with an Ag Exemption and you don't pay sales tax, nor register/title the bike. All you get is the MSO. 90% of the new quads in Texas are sold this way.

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**** LISTEN ****

for me to bring bikes back across the border that i buy in the states i need a COO.

its vital!

In states that don't require a title, and owners still have the COO/MSO you wouldn't have much problem. From somewhere like here in Missouri, you'd have to go to the MO DMV and get them to issue another one (guessing about this, as that would be the only way I can think of that you could get one for a used bike). And the bike would have to be properly registered in the first place to have any chance of getting a replacement COO/MSO.

Big PITA here with "bill of sale" bikes. So many times I've went to look at a used bike, and they don't have a title. "I can give you a bill of sale" they say. No real proof of ownership as someone back down the line who bought it used didn't register/title the bike.

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My best friend had his CR250 stolen out of the back of my truck. He bought this bike from his employer, whom had the MSO but only gave my buddy a bill of sale. The cops found the bike but would not give it back with just a bill of sale. When he finally produced the MSO, they gave him his bike.

BTW, if you have farm/ranch land in Texas, you can buy dirt bikes with an Ag Exemption and you don't pay sales tax, nor register/title the bike. All you get is the MSO. 90% of the new quads in Texas are sold this way.

See what I mean? Laws are different in every state. Even tractors here, if above a certain HP rating, have to be registered and titled. Same buddy that was in the WR250F deal has a Kubota tractor he uses as a lawn mower (his yard is over an acre), and it is titled.

All of that is so the state can charge you personal property tax on the stuff every year. My assessment form every year lists everything from bikes, quads, boats, tractors, cars, trucks, pigs, cows, airplanes, it's a 2 page list of stuff that is taxable.

The government WILL be paid.:bonk:

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It's a worthless document in Arizona even if you have a bill of sale to go with it. They want you to have a clear perfect title and then you pay them $25 tax a year per bike. F them. I am a proud outlaw and they can kiss my arse. It adds a little excitment back to the ride when you know the greedy goverment will get a run for their money if they try and visit with me. They can throw me in jail, impound my bike and stand me in front of a judge before I pay a bonding company money for a title that gives me the right to pay more tax.

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And it states "illegal for use on public roads", so I wont even waste my time on line @ the dmv-thanks all

Actually, that's going to make it easier to get a title/plate if you want to.

Here in CO, you put all the equipment needed to make it street-legal (Horn, mirrors, head-/tail-lights, DOT tires), do an inspection at the state patrol office, and take those forms to the DMV. With proof that the bike was never titled previously (since the MSO says "not for highway use" or equivalent) and an inspection form saying it meets the requirements for highway use, they can issue a title and plate for that vehicle.

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I wish I lived in Co, but in NY, i'm betting that the 9 digit id#(read no 16# vin) will keep that bike from ever seeing a registration...

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