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Is my 74' TC185 worthy of a build?

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I got his bike as part of a trade for a quad i got rid of, and not sure what to do with it. I see that parts for them are not as common as others out there, and was wondering if I should spend my money on it.

Here are a few pics of it as it sits now, and I know the tank is the wrong one.

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Is this guy worth a rebuild or should I drive it into the ground?

Any comments on this would be of great appreciation.

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No way I would invest $$ to restore that bike. Waaaayyyyy too far gone. Would possibly be a candidate for another parts bike of one I WOULD restore.

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does it run right now? if it does i would clean it up a bit and just ride it how she is. its still a dirt bike and it would still be fun to ride. fix the seat, make the speedo work and head light work, and maybe paint the exhaust just to get the rust out of the picture, and be happy.

if it doesn't run, try to keep it under 200 bucks and get her going and do the same thing i said above if it was running. be happy.

just my 2 cents. again its a old dirt bike, and older bikes are always a blast to ride! even if its only around your house. if you can keep it under 200 bucks i would think it worth it.

but for a full restore? idk by the looks of i dont think i would, im only 21 and i got 3 older bikes and while im young i wanna ride them and get the use out of them, and have fun. maybe when i retire and have a butt load of cash ill do some full restores but for now im riding them!

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I have not had it running yet but was told it ran. It does crank over, just doesn't have any spark. should be an easy fix, but ya never know what is in store.

If I were to keep it I would need a seat pan and cover, tank, lights fenders and speedo.

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I love bringing these old bikes back. I'm partial to old Suzukis, and right now I'm starting a resto on a 1973 ts185. Lots of fun if you enjoy that sort of thing. If doing it for money, it will prolly be a losing proposition. Just my 2 cents.

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she's pretty beat, but... you could do a workin fix er up better kinda thing to spruce it up, clean sand grind paint - find a tank and a seat cover on ebay and a speedo, some new tires, cables, chain and sprockets, top end job, levers and grips, repack the forks, replace and or fix the wiring harness as required, rear shocks? better set and or clean up and use as is? brake shoes, maybe wheel bearings? just a list of some things to consider.

The TS185 was a hoot to ride and gave the 4 stoke 250's of the time fits, it would flat out smoke a Honda XL175. The TC had a low high transmission and I think there maybe less of them produced than the TS. TC's had chome steel fenders, TS has plastcis ones.

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I think that I am going to do the build.

first question is about the tank. What tank options can I use and what about the gas cap for a stocker tank?

second would be about the fenders. Do the TS fenders fit, and does anyone make them new?

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i would get it running and than ride it as is. get a new seat cover and go for it. unless it has sentimental value or is special to you, restoring is going to add up, and as ccman60 said if your expecting to make money, probably not going to happen.

i have done it both ways, got a beater bike got it running and just rode it as is, and had as a loaner/buddy/teaching bike and it worked great.

also put more money than its worth into a bike, but i plan on keeping it for awhile and just having fun.

its your money, but it helps to have an idea of what your expecting from the end product and do your research and be realistic. than go for it.

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What would be the sell price for a bike like this? In this condition, or restored say 80%?

Just to get an idea of how much I would be willing to put unto it.

I plan on replacing the tank and doing a partial tear down to paint it up nice. And if I could I would like to replace the fenders with something plastic. I know the plastic will be the expensive part, but if I could I would love to end up with a good rider for about $300, and not feel like I wasted my money.

If it ain't worth say about $400 when I am done, then I think it will be torn down and part it out.

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What would be the sell price for a bike like this? In this condition, or restored say 80%?

I had one for 4 years and sold it this summer for $650.00, and the guy was glad to get it. It ran good and looked good, same red color as your oil tank, but was starting to develop some piston slap, at 3000 miles, but this is desert where I live, so the dust gets to them. I wanted to sell it before the piston slap got so bad no one would want it. I had fun riding it, it was a good, light single track bike, it had the Hi Low, 5 speed gearbox, a lot of fun, just not fast, or real powerfull.:bonk:

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im not going to tell you what you can or cant get. but originality is usually the key to older bikes, unless its period correct upgrades as far as worth is concerned. i would first figure out why the motor isnt running, and see where you stand at that point. if anything it would be worth more even as a parts bike if it runs.

double check the oil injection. im not sure about suzukis, but i have lost a motor to one failing on an older kawasaki trail boss. when they go bad you may not get any notice or warning until its too late.

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Go ahead and get it running. It's amazing what can be done with steel wool, spray bombs, polish, sand paper and patience. You could make even make it more fun be by seeing how cheap it would be to make an acceptabe trail bike out of it. The last bike I did that with was completed for less than $150.00. My rule is "if it runs (even a pop) it gets fixed up".

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TS250.jpga>I am currently doing a TS250R disaasembled down to frame, repacked steering head bearings, bead blasted the battery box, ignition switch housing and coil bracket and primed and painted. I use a wire wheel in a drill motor and clean as much original hardware as I can, and reuse. Frame is a hand sand plus orbital sander and the wire wheel for crevices. Removed the swingarm and bead blasted prime and paint. A friend is shooting the tank and fenders and I am doing the side cover. Using Eastwood argent silver paint. All new cables, new set of vintage bend bars from rockymountain.atv, new grips, (OEM suzuki from bay) new levers from Dennis Kirk, new tires, chain and sprockets, new brake shoes. Has the headlight bucket, ears and heat shield rechromed. Now this is not professional level every detail completely redone, but in my humble opinion a darn good "working resto" as the bike will be a rider. The engine is rebuilt and has a new wiseco second over piston in it. Cleaned and flushed oil tank. Engine was pressure washed and meticously cleaned and mildly polished to retain the original luster prior to rebuild.

this is just one of many "working resto's" I have done. The frame up powder coat is a long process and stalls on me because of the indepth work involved, a working resto I can complete in a few weeks and produces a fine looking bike.

This is the last one I did.

http://i264.photobucket.com/albums/ii162/a6chris/TS250.jpg

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I can't get in side your head...

...to see what your thinking, so I'll rather just give you my opinion of it if it were mine! I would def do that up! Lots of parts are avail for that really popular ride! As far as original, or pretty don't worry about that, just get it running and go enjoy it!

But, then again I drug a bike out of the Reservoir that was there for 20 years and did it up, so be careful who ya talk to, some of us are CRAZY and will replace and fix everything just to say we did... LOL!

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Motosprtman that is a beutiful job you did on you 185.

MTBMoto do you have any before and after pictures of your rescue. We would love to see them.

Here is my free Jawa, when I find the before pictures I can post them. Its not a show stopper by any means but for $150.00 to make it ridable, it works fine as a trials/play bike.

Picture050.jpg

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my photo bike is a 72 TS250J that was in the same or worse shape thna the thread starter bike, utilizing my previously explained methods, yes you can have a very nice bike! that can be a daily rider or just an occasional one. None of my bikes see the rain and are only rode on warm spring or summer days. I love the comments on them when I am parked someone always had one just like it etc. Part of the past, brought back to service. Simple great machines.

Edited by Motosprtman

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All right now, I got it running today.

I got a used tank in the mail last Thursday, but it turned out to have been misrepresented on E-Gay. It turned out to be off of a 75' TC100. It will be on its way back to him on Tuesday

What about the oil mixing on this bike...... can I trust the resivor? Or should I start premixing my fuel instead? And what should I mix it at, 20:1, or what?

Does anyone have a descent set of plastic fenders they would be willing to let go for me?

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