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when clearing trail logs...

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I"m not good enough to clear larger logs, say 24in ( large to me anyways) at trail speed without coming to almost a complete stop, down shifting into 1st and wheeling over it. Problem seems that when doing this first gear seems a little violent to handle, the bike pops to quickly and it seems like I loose some control. I was wondering if anyone stays in a little higher gear to get a mellower wheel action and better control as you clear the log. I know its all about clutch control but I"m just looking for a little more control. Can't really practice much over the next few months as its getting cold around here.

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I have the same conundrum at times. I can pop the front in first but it can be harsh with my 472. If I want more control I keep it in 2nd and slip the clutch to pop it up. 2nd gear allows the rear to crawl over the log with less wheel spin than if I kept it in first the whole time.

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If you lift the front tire clear of the log, you lose the help of the front suspension in pogo-sticking the rear tire UP to the log.. If the rear tire stays on the ground at impact, it will bounce BACK as it tries to go over (unless the log is smaller than your tire) and you lose forward momentum and come crashing down on the skid plate.. Here is a slow motion of that exact problem and solution.. still Trials bikes, but the technique is the same:

http://vimeo.com/4847728

Notice that even though I'm not banging the front tire into the log as I do on bigger ones, my front tire does NOT go any higher than the very top of the log. When done correctly, the rear tire will just track over the log with no bounce.

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aim the front wheel at the top third of the log and stay on the back tire and go over. if you have trouble with learning how through videos, just go at it and do it a few times and find what works! sometimes you can almost seatbounce it over smaller ones.

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aim the front wheel at the top third of the log and stay on the back tire and go over. if you have trouble with learning how through videos, just go at it and do it a few times and find what works! sometimes you can almost seatbounce it over smaller ones.

The first part is accurate but you DON'T want to stay on the back tire for the larger ones. Think Pogo Stick and launch that rear tire UP BEFORE it gets to the log :bonk:

OK, I'm outta here.. gotta fly to Austin, TX

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From an old expert trials rider turned "A" Enduro rider the technique was called a Jap Zap when I was competing.

Basically, because the log is small you can bring the front wheel up into the log, above half the log, butt back( straight arms), which compresses the front and rear suspension.

Then, big( everyones' "big" is different) throttle , As the suspension compresses, and just before releasing clutch, get centered or but ahead of the pegs.

Release the clutch with big throttle. The bike will move forward through your legs while you don't move forward, then repull the clutch after the rear wheel hits the log.

The "perfect" technique is to stay on a wheelie with rear wheel on the log.

For smaller logs I push down into the forks, then throttle as I shift my weight back to load the rear suspension, then un-weight the rear wheel to hop it off the ground. This is a "bunny hop".

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mathprof has good info.. I find smaller logs are not much of an issue and my offroad suspension soaks it with just lofting the front wheel over and getting down to at least 2nd gear. My rear shock has a larger bleed hole than mx valving, it was kicking up at the rear even with the HS compression backed way out.. there is some give-take with offroad softer valving and mx valving.

Don't forget, MOMENTUM is your friend on big logs. don't be scared, as long as the front wheel gets above 1/2 way, your home free provided you have enough momentum to not get stuck..

One thing im finding VERY COOL about having a recluse clutch, it is pretty much just off gas/on gas to get the front up. No more "almost" with the clutch control, i still cover the clutch lever but the auto cltch takes alot of the guess work out of things. Lots more consistant log crossings.

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The first part is accurate but you DON'T want to stay on the back tire for the larger ones. Think Pogo Stick and launch that rear tire UP BEFORE it gets to the log :bonk:

OK, I'm outta here.. gotta fly to Austin, TX

idk i've stayed on the back all the time! but then again! i have almost depressingly soft suspension so it doesn't pogo much on me... still need to get off my lazy ass and fix that...:smirk:

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Everybody has their favorite techniques: I don't like to put my feet down.

So when I go over logs I try to use enough throttle so the back wheel goes from the ground to the top of the log. Good clutch work and your weight back will keep traction at the rear wheel and a sweet wheelie off the log.

Some riders think that they are in a hurry when climbing over obstacles.

Actually you want to slow down( a little), keep your feet up, and stay in control of the bike.

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trick to those 4th gear crossings is finding some kind of bump, root or rock to hit ahead of the log , WAY ahead of the log if your really flying

I'm still trying to find logs like in the vids, the ones I encounter aren't so perfectly placed :bonk: it's more like "do I go under it or over it, or look for a line around the end through the thick brush"

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the preload bounce like in one of the video's is how I do it, I've crossed logs I can barely climb over that way, but I only do that if I have a safe route back if I cant get back over it

once you do it a few times it becomes fun, I really need to get a trials bike, I love that kinda riding

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i have almost depressingly soft suspension so it doesn't pogo much on me... still need to get off my lazy ass and fix that...:smirk:

If you are referring to the "Pogo-Stick" I mentioned in my post, I was not talking about any bike condition or feature. I was saying that you should treat the rear tire as IF you were jumping ON a Pogo-Stick...

Keep in mind that the following tip is for jumps where you land front tire first AND on logs as large or tall as your front tire or larger.

Get the front wheel up to make contact or impact with the log and at that very moment, you combine the rebound of the front forks WITH your Pogo-Stick like jump of the rear tire using your legs and body... but if you are pulling back as if trying to do a long wheelie into the log, it will not work well.. You need to get back (return to) over the foot pegs as you launch so that you almost do a diving board type of jump with your body and then give all of that momentum BACK to the bike..

Get up and into it. Lead with your head. You will most likely lose sight of your hands when doing this correctly. IF you can still see your hands at the point where it is time to unload the rear suspension, it's a clear sign that you are hanging back and are NOT over the pegs ready for your body part of the jump. YOU jump first and the BIKE follows. Use the bike as a spring board to almost jump ahead of the bike and then, TRADE PLACES... meaning, give ALL of YOUR body momentum back to the bike. In slow motion, it will look like your head has come to a stop while the bike comes up and over under you.. You finish with the bike way out in front and your butt over the rear fender.. that is for logs where you land front tire first... Many of my log jump training videos I've shared show this to some degree of exaggeration and some clearly show a comparison between right and wrong including the consequences. I think I've already posted them in this thread somewhere. :bonk:

Let me stress: PUNCH that log with your front tire so that you get at least 3 to 5 inches of fork compression and rebound but then, be sure to NOT let the front tire climb any higher after that contact.. Keep it LOW and FLAT

Edited by 2PLY

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