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Can you run Amsoil full synthetic 0w-40 in a 2005 KLR250 ?

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I am running the Amsoil Fully Synthetic 0w-40 oil in my ATV which I ride all winter long here in NJ.

The 2005 KLR250 however I don't ride in the winter.. but I do ride it down to around the 30 degree area.. and then of course in the summer up to 100 degrees. I know the owners manual calls for using 10w-40 oil in this KLR.. just wondering if I could use the same 0w-40 Amsoil fully synthetic in this bike? will it cause problems?

here is the oil I'm talking about: http://www.amsoil.com/catalog.aspx?GroupID=8

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Sure you can. Just don't go to long drain intervals. If I ran that oil more than 1000 miles, I'd send a sample out to an oil analysis lab to make sure it was maintaining it's stated viscosity. No matter if it is "full synthetic" or not, they still shear. :bonk:

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well what I'm wondering is the 0w-40 too THIN of an oil at startup time (when the engine is cold)?

does the KLR250 motor NEED the 10w oil when starting up to keep all the parts properly lubed inside the engine?

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well what I'm wondering is the 0w-40 too THIN of an oil at startup time (when the engine is cold)?

does the KLR250 motor NEED the 10w oil when starting up to keep all the parts properly lubed inside the engine?

ALL OIL IS TOO THICK AT COLD STARTUP!

A 0w-XX oil is usually a zero weight base, with additives that make it act like a 40 weight when it's at 100 degrees Centigrade. There are some that are a 5 or even a 10 weight, with PPD (Pour Point Depressants) that make it flow at the lower temps, as if it were a zero weight...but, that's not common.

The only thing good about a 10W-40 compared to a 0w-40 is that usually a 0w-40 will shear quicker than a 10w-40. Exceptions are some true synthetics that naturally have the characteristics of BOTH a zero weight base at the cold temp range, as well as a 40 weight at 100 degrees.

The way you phrased your question makes me think you've made a fairly common assumption that simply isn't true. The fact is: Multiviscosity oil weights are expressed in two numbers, and the first number refers to the lowest temperature at which the oil can be seen to flow at all. The lower the temp where the oil is noticed to flow, the lower that first number. The oil is THICK, THICK, THICK at those low temps...too thick to flow well enough to be pumped normally through the engine. So, again, at COLD startup, ALL OIL IS TOO THICK!

As oil warms, it gets THINNER. A 40 weight is thicker than a 30 weight at 100 degrees...both will be thinner at 100 degrees than when at any lower temperature. Both a 30 and a 40 weight will be VERY MUCH THINNER when at 100 degrees than a Zero weight oil is when it's freezing. See what I mean?

I hope this helps....

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Thats what I've been running in my bike for over 12,000 miles. I also run it in my 99 Dodge 2500 Diesel. :bonk:

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so from what I take I will be just fine running the 0w-40 in the 2005 KLR250?

can I operate the bike in all temperature ranges with this 0w-40 oil?

anything I should know different than what the owners manual says when running 0w-40 fully synthetic.. such as different oil change intervals, etc.?

thanks guys for your help... you are much more knowledgable than I am lol

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The BEST way to know when to change it is to do UOA's (Used Oil Analysis). Instead of that, as long as you change it every 1500-2000 miles, you should be well within it's capabilities to protect and lube the engine. Change your oil filter every OTHER time, or perhaps every THIRD time, if you are changing the oil at these short intervals.

Remember, this is not a modern, Fuel Injected car engine, many of which can go 10,000 miles between oil changes. It's a dirty, carbed thumper with a shared sump, and it chews up oil much more quickly.

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just use what the manual calls for .. end of story. :smirk:

The British army used to always stand in a straight line, and wore red. Sometimes stepping out of the line of convention isn't a bad thing to do.

:bonk:

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i just simply want to know if using 0w-40 fully synthetic in the 2005 KLR250 is safe.. just as safe as what the manual calls for which is 10w-40 ?

I have a fully case of the Amsoil 0w-40 oil so I would like to not have to buy more of it ya know?

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i just simply want to know if using 0w-40 fully synthetic in the 2005 KLR250 is safe.. just as safe as what the manual calls for which is 10w-40 ?

If you still have any doubts, I'll pay shipping to have it sent to me. I'll run it in my KLX, do UOA's, and send you the results! :bonk:

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