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I am probablly bringing a big can opener for this can of worms :bonk:

Before the spring thaw, I plan on adding a GPS to my arsenal of tricks. Although I'm familiar with GPS units used for auto, marine, and aviation applications, I've never used one for traveling thru the woods. That being said, I'm familiar with basic tool usage and technical terms but, am a little naive on how to implement for this application.

Since researching the archives, I've identified three potential options. Each seems to have their definite +'s and -'s and I'm torn. Here are the options I'm looking at:

1. TrailTech Voyager

2. Garmin 60CSX (discontinued...but still seems to be available)

3. DeLorme PN-40 (discontinued I think but the PN-60 seems to be the replacement)

In the perfect world, I would be sold on the TrailTech Voyager, if it was easily portable (so I can use during hiking recon missions) and had the capability of displaying topo maps. I really like how it integrates into the bike and the extra display options over the KTM computer (i.e. rpm, H2O temp, etc).

That being said, I'm wondering if a stand alone GPS like the Garmin or DeLorme would be the better option...seems like they might be overall more functional as a GPS (even though it lacks the bike integration).

Thoughts and opinions???

Also, are there any other GPS units I should add to my consideration list?

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There is a superb GPS forum at ADVRider.com which will answer all your questions related to MCs and GPS.

That said the 60 or 76 in either cx or csx variants have been the standard.

They have been replaced by the newer 62 and 78 but the 62 lost a good hardwire power option leaving the 78 as preferred. The newer units are not worth a great deal more than the 60/76, more evolution then revolution.

The new Garmin Montana is fantastic but pricey.

Many basic trail type GPS do not come with detail maps leaving it to the owner to choose what kind of map is desired and most will need a good MC mount so consider the cost of these.

I don't see the Voyager as a full function GPS, more as a MC dash with some GPS function. A niche product IMO.

The DeLorme PN-40 has a small screen and is like owning a Beta machine in a VHS world if you are that old. It's a Garmin world out there.

Also Garmin factory referbs come up at times and the several I have had look to be brand new and would consider those as well.

Bruce

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I would carefully look at the Oregon or Montana from Garmin. Their City Navigator software shows driveways and some trails too. Good size screen.

I have found that for off road use, having "track" capability vs "route" is a must. Tracks are breadcrumb-type lines that don't follow any roads, trails, etc. Routes use the roads and turnpoints and these dont work for saving trails out in the woods.

Have fun!

MrHix

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I asked on ADVRider in their GPS thread and after reviewing the responses, I chose the Garmin GPSMAP 60csx.

Got it new from REI and bought the DVD CityNav all for $301. Then got a Ram Mount for $30 from another GPS site. ?? can't recall now. It is the accepted GPS for many events that download routes at the start. I like it. Took a little learning to get used to how to run it, (it has way more features than you need)

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I use a Garmin unit that I carry in a pouch attached to my camelback strap. This works fine for situations of 'where the heck am I?' A downside is that I keep it powered off unless I am lost and needing it, so it takes a couple minutes to get connected with satellites when I turn it on. Another downside of being off is I don't capture breadcrumbs...nor can I create a track of where I've been. A plus of being off most of the time is I'm not burning up batteries. A downside of not being hardwired is I need batteries and I've been using the lithium ones due to extended life (plus they are as light as a feather). You can leave it on and create tracks and capture breadcrumbs (and I do sometimes) but I always carry extra batteries.

If I had my druthers, I'd get a nice unit that can be mounted on my bars in lieu of a bike computer, hardwired to my bike so it could be on all the time, and with a nice big color display that can be read in the sunlight and for which I can get good maps. It sounds like I need to read the ADV rider thread too to see what is best but perhaps BDM has provided all we need to know.

If, on the other hand, if you just want it for emergency type use like how I use mine, my approach is effective. I carry paper maps and have a Vapor bike computer for mileage and bike data.

Hope this gives you some things to think about.

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I asked on ADVRider in their GPS thread and after reviewing the responses, I chose the Garmin GPSMAP 60csx.

Got it new from REI and bought the DVD CityNav all for $301. Then got a Ram Mount for $30 from another GPS site. ?? can't recall now. It is the accepted GPS for many events that download routes at the start. I like it. Took a little learning to get used to how to run it, (it has way more features than you need)

Mine is about a 3 year old Etrex...maybe a 60 csx....I forget the numbers but it has a color screen that is too small for my liking. I concur with you about having to get used to how to use it. I find them to not be very intuitive and at first, if I hadn't used it for a while, I had to give myself a refresher before each trip.

One trip I forgot to put the area's maps on the unit. :bonk: Naturally it was only marginally useful. I could mark waypoints, but that was about it. I never needed it though.

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It sounds like I need to read the ADV rider thread too to see what is best but perhaps BDM has provided all we need to know.

Hope this gives you some things to think about.

Hardly, lots to learn just depends what the needs and expectations are.

I use GPS mostly for situational awareness as I still like to do my own navigating but you do lose a lot of function if off and packed away so mine stays on. I can afford 2 AA batteries every 3 or 4 days.

My best advise to anyone new to GPS or with a new GPS is to practice before you need to depend on it. My wife and I often practice while the other drives even if we know where we are and where we are headed. Many first posts on ADVRider go something like "I bought a GPS today, leaving on a 2 week trip tomorrow how does this d_m thing work?".

These are not simple car navigators.

Bruce

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Out of the three, the Garmin csx is a nice unit. I've been using a Garmin etrex for a few years and recently moved to the Garmin 60cx. The screen is marginally larger, but I really like having the buttons on the front so that I can work them with gloves on. With that said, the etrex is still a very usable unit for trail riding and inexpensive. Also you will need to purchase the Garmin Topo maps.

I use the regular Garmin handlebar mount for my GPS mounting. I know lots of guys really like the RAM mounts, but I've never had an issue with the stock unit.

I don't have experience with the other two units, so I can't give you the good and bad.

Don't expect to use the GPS at high speed. It's get difficult to go at race pace, dodge trees, watch odometers, and look at the gps.

Good luck.

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I have both the Garmin 60cx and the Trailtech Voyager. I think the Trailtech Voyager works the best for motorcycles. I have Voyagers on both my 500 XCW and 350 XC-F.

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I think the Trailtech Voyager works the best for motorcycles. I have Voyagers on both my 500 XCW and 350 XC-F.

What type of detailed maps (not tracks) and "Points of Interest" (POI) database can be loaded to a Voyager?

Bruce

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Thank you all for your advice!!!

Maybe because there are so many options to choose from but, I am have a really hard time with this decision :bonk:

I've been researching the Garmin website and other forums and think I've narrowed my choices down to two:

TrailTech Voyager & Garmin GPSMAP 60CSx

The more I think about the intended use and flexibility, I am leaning more and more towards a stand alone GPS unit vs. the TrailTech Voyager. That being said, I still really like how the Voyager integrates into the bike and some of the other options that are included that a stand-alone GPS wouldn't have. Of course, on the flip side, I really like the fact that I can take the GPS on reconnaissance hikes and can load topo maps and can even get turn by turn directions for pavement use.

So the jury is still out but, if I decide to go with a stand-alone unit (which is where I'm currently leaning towards), I think the Garmin GPSMAP 60CSx makes perfect sense for the following reasons:

- Although discontinued thru Garmin, it's still available and at a reasonable price

- Seems to be a tremendously popular unit for off-road moto adventuring

- Ability to load topo maps

- No touch screen...making it easier to operate with gloves

- High sensitivity for travel in dense woods (ala New England)

- Basic features...doesn't have some of the crazy bells and whistles of the current models (i.e. camera, wireless sync, connect, etc)

Both the TrailTech and Garmin 60CSx units are definitely in my price range...was hoping not to spend more than $350 and some of the new models are down right ridiculously expensive. If they were even close to my price cap, I might be willing to spend the extra loot. When we are talking $200 - $400 more expensive, and I can't really understand what whiz-bang features you are getting that can justify the added cost, it just seems like a no brainer.

So now that I've narrowed my choices down (TT Voyager or 60CSx), what would you go with?....based on previous input, I'm assuming the Garmin unit.

Also, assuming I decided to go with the Garmin 60CSx, does anyone have opinions or evidence that I may have overlooked, supporting the purchase of a newer model? What features doe the 60CSx not have that I might miss???

Bottom line, I don't want to make a purchase that I will regret and at the same time, don't want to buy something that will be extremely obsolete in a couple of years.

p.s. I want to hardwire any unit I choose so, I know that limits options too.

Thanks again!!!!!!!

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I don't want to sell the Voyager short and I'm not going to review the thread on ADVRider but it's my understanding it can import/export waypoints, routes and tracks.

I believe it does not have the capability to load wide area detailed maps such as Topo maps, auto routing street maps. Looks like what TrailTech calls a "Map" page is a collection of user data (WPs, RTs & TRs) on an otherwise blank screen, not a map set let alone several map sets (Topo+Street). I don't see any labels for road names, geographic points or POIs.

I'm sure the Voyager has some modern updates (sensitivity, memory, screen resolution), and there is certainly more in the the way of open source GPX files available today, but this unit is similar to the function (gray scale display, WPs, RTs & TRs, no map) as my Garmin 38 from the late 90's.

I hope I'm not being unfair to the unit but in this day and age a GPS w/o map capability is a nonstarter for me.

Bruce

PS If planning to hardwire stay away from any unit that can only be powered via mini USB, they are not robust and weather proof.

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I think you are spot on, BDM...that is my interpretation of the TrailTech Voyager too. I am really surprised that they didn't integrate some of the latest mapping features of hand held GPS units and I know exactly what is going to happen. I will buy the Garmin 60CXs and next year TT will update the Voyager to include all the latest bells and whistles. If the Voyager was there already, I would probablly purchase it over anything else.

Oh well...think the 60CXs will make it's way to my Xmas stocking.

Do you know what power connection is on the 60CXs? I looked at the specs on Garmin's website and I couldn't find the info. I then looked at the car adapter accessory they offer and it doesn't look like it's mini-USB but, am not 100% sure.

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Do you know what power connection is on the 60CXs? I looked at the specs on Garmin's website and I couldn't find the info. I then looked at the car adapter accessory they offer and it doesn't look like it's mini-USB but, am not 100% sure.

The 60, 76, 78 all have power via 2ea AA, mini USB and the preferred HD 4 pin round. On the new 62 the 4 pin round has sadly been dropped.

Bruce

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I think you are spot on, BDM...that is my interpretation of the TrailTech Voyager too. I am really surprised that they didn't integrate some of the latest mapping features of hand held GPS units and I know exactly what is going to happen. I will buy the Garmin 60CXs and next year TT will update the Voyager to include all the latest bells and whistles. If the Voyager was there already, I would probablly purchase it over anything else.

Don't think so. Garmin as a company isn't without fault but they so dominate the market that little else has much hardware/software support. For example other brands don't have 1/10th the international mapping options as are available for Garmin units.

Bruce

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My Advice is to get the Garmin GPSMAP 76Cx. It has bigger buttons than the 60 (think pushing buttons while wearing gloves) and the antenna is protected since it's inside the case. I've seen guys break the antenna off a 60.

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My Advice is to get the Garmin GPSMAP 76Cx. It has bigger buttons than the 60 (think pushing buttons while wearing gloves) and the antenna is protected since it's inside the case. I've seen guys break the antenna off a 60.

Tend to agree but not a big issue. Also the RAM cradle for the 76 is better then their 60 cradle. I wouldn't pay a significant premium for a 76 over the 60 though.

The hot deal right now is at the West Marine web site..... 76CX for $149.99 and free shipping.

The same machine as the 60CX in a different form factor and it floats.

Bruce

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My Advice is to get the Garmin GPSMAP 76Cx. It has bigger buttons than the 60 (think pushing buttons while wearing gloves) and the antenna is protected since it's inside the case. I've seen guys break the antenna off a 60.

Bingo. The 76 csx RAM cradle holds the unit in place better also. I would have broken a 60 csx antenna off several times. Get a hardwired four pin cable and run it straight to the battery, with a fuse of course.

http://www.thegpsstore.com/Gilsson-RB-Hardwire-PowerData-Cable-P669.aspx

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