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KASHIMA coated fork tubes

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Does anyone know if the fork tubes off a 2011 yz250f will interchange with the fork tubes off a 2010 kx450f? I found a new set of kashima coated tubes for a good price but its off a 2011 yz250f. Im trying to cut some cost down before I send my stuff out to enzo by getting tubes already coated instead of theirs.

Thanks

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Does anyone know if the fork tubes off a 2011 yz250f will interchange with the fork tubes off a 2010 kx450f? I found a new set of kashima coated tubes for a good price but its off a 2011 yz250f. Im trying to cut some cost down before I send my stuff out to enzo by getting tubes already coated instead of theirs.

Thanks

why do you want to get them done? it's really expensive. now, i know there are those that will say it's the best thing since sliced bread. hey, i can get that done by two of my accounts. but i'll say this; one of the pro riders' i did work for, noticed the spring/valving more than the coating on the tubes. it's good; don't get me wrong. but, money is better spent on the springs/valving than the expensive coatings.

besides, if the dlc was so good; why doesn't honda come stock with it? lol!

in other words; good coatings won't save bad valving, or incorrect springs.

if you are dead-set on getting the stuff coated, have ross do it. you'll know it came from a good source.:bonk:

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I notice it on tree root type stuff, I cant see why all bikes wouldnt have it in a few years

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Are you talking about the fork legs? If so, those are not kashima, but rather DLC (Diamond-Like Carbon). As much of a pain in the @$$ it is to get the fork lugs off on KYB forks (it is much easier on SHOWA forks fyi), I wouldn't even bother. As GDI70, said above, the money is much better spent on just the valving and springs.

If you are truly wanting to have them coated, I would cut the middle man out and send them directly to a company that does the DLC (or TiNi if you want to go the cheaper route) coating. If you do some searching around, you will see a couple of threads about direct DLC companies. Carbon Raptor is one company that does it. I don't know how much they charge for the fork legs, but they charge $100 for the shock shaft. TiNi coating is a little cheaper, I think I was quoted $50 for a shock shaft.

If you are wanting to reduce stiction, going with SKF seals might be a better and much more economical choice.

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Are you talking about the fork legs? If so, those are not kashima, but rather DLC (Diamond-Like Carbon). As much of a pain in the @$$ it is to get the fork lugs off on KYB forks (it is much easier on SHOWA forks fyi), I wouldn't even bother. As GDI70, said above, the money is much better spent on just the valving and springs.

If you are truly wanting to have them coated, I would cut the middle man out and send them directly to a company that does the DLC (or TiNi if you want to go the cheaper route) coating. If you do some searching around, you will see a couple of threads about direct DLC companies. Carbon Raptor is one company that does it. I don't know how much they charge for the fork legs, but they charge $100 for the shock shaft. TiNi coating is a little cheaper, I think I was quoted $50 for a shock shaft.

If you are wanting to reduce stiction, going with SKF seals might be a better and much more economical choice.

Thanks for all the responses, oh and im talking about the upper fork tubes.

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Those are likely the KYB A kit - Kashima coated from the factory. If you're looking for the cherry on top of a good setup, buy em. I would if I was riding a KYB fork.

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Those are likely the KYB A kit - Kashima coated from the factory. If you're looking for the cherry on top of a good setup, buy em. I would if I was riding a KYB fork.

Will those change out on my existing 2010 kx450f forks, like will they fit in to my clamps which are pro circuit?

Thanks

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Will those change out on my existing 2010 kx450f forks, like will they fit in to my clamps which are pro circuit?

Thanks

My guess is yes they will. But you should call Pro Circuit to verify.

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Thanks for all the responses, oh and im talking about the upper fork tubes.

Why would you coat upper fork tubes? Is this for when the spring rubs?

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Why would you coat upper fork tubes? Is this for when the spring rubs?

the kashima coating is extremely hard/durable. it's purpose is to reduce friction from the bushing, and to last longer than the stock anodizing.

it is a proprietary coating from japan.

it's also used on the shock bodies to reduce friction/heat from the sealing band on the shock piston.

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Different stuff, similar concept. I forgot that moto forks use the inner upper tube as a bearing surface. MTB forks use 2 stationary bushings so the only bearing surface is the outside of the inner tube.

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isnt it the same as dlc? same stuff different name

no the kashima is for the aluminum shock/fork parts. the dlc is for the lower tubes/shock shaft. they have different properties. both extremely durable, but they are on different metals. aluminum/steel. they do share the same teflon bushing material they slide on; fork/shock bushings.

some companies use the rainbow (titanium nitrate) coatings. common to the a-kit showas. i've seen that stuff wear out after a season of use (pro-level). it is also aimed at friction reduction.

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Why would you coat upper fork tubes? Is this for when the spring rubs?

On some forks most noticably zoke 45 and 50 the quality control is not so good and the anodizing is of questionable quality subsequently the lands in the upper tube, where the bushings reside start to wear and the bushings start to rock in the lands with time things become compounded by the extra clearance and pretty soon your forks wont stop leaking despite having fresh bushings and seals. At that point if the underlying alum is worn your forks are junk.Trick is to get the uppers coated with a harder finish to alleviate any potencial problems before they start. I rebuilt a set of poorly serviced zoke 45's where the oil looked like it came out of a million mile diesel with spun bearings.

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Why would you coat upper fork tubes? Is this for when the spring rubs?

Remember the fork tubes have 2 bushings. The bushing seated in the bottom of the outer tube slides against the inner tube. The bushing seated around the top of the inner tube slides against the inside of the outer tube.

FWIW, I tried a fork with Kashima uppers and it had a very nice feel. Stiction is critical in fork performance.

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No one actually answered his question.

The 2011 yzf250 tubes are 2mm bigger at the top than the KX tubes.

But 2012 yzf250 tubes are now the same top diameter as yzf,kxf,crf 450, but there are other dimensions to consider such as length and taper.

The Kashima coated top tubes make a considerable difference to the action of the fork,while the DLC lower tubes dont make the fork any smoother but are way more resistant to abuse.

Ken Wheeler

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I've been for years trying to figure out what exactly kashima is? is it just a "diffrent name for hard coat anodizing or is it a PVD applied coating?

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I've been for years trying to figure out what exactly kashima is? is it just a "diffrent name for hard coat anodizing or is it a PVD applied coating?

It is pretty much a modified anodizing process. Basically, it is a hard coat anodizing with the addition of lubricating molybdenum disulfide, deposited via electrical induction. The kashima coating can attain a level of hardness and abrasion resistance four times higher than hard anodized aluminum.

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