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Trying to lower seat by adjusting shock - help

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Sorry but it affects everything. You also need to loosen the triple clamp bolts and RAISE the forks EQUALLY in the clamps to balance out what you did to the rear. And read your manual for proper torque values to use on the clamping bolts. Everything you do to the suspension has a direct, immediate effect on how the bike reacts and handles. Just slow trail riding will be ok, but when you start to go faster things may not go as you expect.

You aren't wrong, but you also aren't right. There are large variations in steering geometery and small changes make small changes in results. Some folks prefer quicker or slower steering than stock. This is often done in part by raising and lowering and end.

XR's aint' race bikes. :smirk:

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Sorry to inform you but adjusting the spring is adjusting the preload not actually lowering the seat!! If you want to alter seat height replace the shock of like previous response above change shock height. But not recommended.

Sorry to inform you but adjusting the preload SURE AS HELL LOWERS (or raises) the seat.

The DIS INFORMATION in the this thread is OUTSTANDING. (LY BAD) :smirk:

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A 17" rear rim (84-85 XR250R) will lower the back 1" but tire selection is limited.

To adjust the spring preload:

Put the bike on a stand so the rear tire is off the ground, this reduces pressure on the spring.

I use Teflon spray lube on the threads and the lower spring perch and sometimes I can turn the spring by hand and it will turn the preload adjuster nut; much faster than a drift.

The linkage ratio near full extension is about 4:1 so changing spring preload 1/4" will change sag 1", but 1/4" is still several turns of the preload nut.

HEY, some CORRECT, actually USEFUL information!!!

Good job! :smirk:

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...Some folks prefer quicker or slower steering than stock. This is often done in part by raising and lowering and end....

yes, absolutely correct

but sorry to say,

the op does not appear to deliberately change his XRs geometry to make it work more to his advantage,

quite the opposite, he does not seem to be aware of th side effects of him 'lowering' the seat height

...XR's aint' race bikes. ...

you must be pretty young

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Sorry to inform you but adjusting the preload SURE AS HELL LOWERS ... the seat.

great, so does letting the air out of your tires

only the side effects are not as obvious

especially not to someone with no idea of what correctly adjusted suspension feels like

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Sorry to inform you but adjusting the preload SURE AS HELL LOWERS (or raises) the seat.

The DIS INFORMATION in the this thread is OUTSTANDING. (LY BAD) :bonk:

The purpose of lowering your seat is to achieve a lower height to reach the ground. Taking the tension off the spring to achieve this is not the place to be altering. Okay so it may lower the seat but only as a result of adjusting the preload. If you take the front wheel off the bike it will also be lower but not rideable. The preload tolerances are fine and:shocked: are there for suspension and rebound not for seat adjustment. :smirk:

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Maybe you guys didn't read the part where he said there was 1.5" of preload on his rear shock. :smirk:

How much is on yours?

I only have about 0.5" of preload on my XR400 (with correct sag)... But I'm sure it's just too easy to spend someone elses money on expensive suspension upgrades.

I don't think this adjustment is going to be a problem. (and I am a betting man... any takers?)

Perc

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Maybe you guys didn't read the part where he said there was 1.5" of preload on his rear shock.

and I must have missed the part, where he mentioned how much sag his bike had, if his bike had a stock spring and how much he weights

now, tell me again, how much preload do I need, in inches, that is?

or was there more to proper suspension setup than just how far you screw the adjuster nut onto your shock ??????????

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I don't know if the original poster is still here, but he and some others are just 'shooting in the dark'. First of all, is the shock spring correct for your weight? How much do you weigh? Does the shock have the original stock spring? It's possible that the spring preload could be backed off to zero and still not be able to attain the proper racing sag?

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Some good info here>

http://performance-design.net/performance_design_suspension.htm

Consider you are still getting used to the bike I imagine you will not be doing 100ft jumps and racing round a supercross track I would try the basic options that will work for now

Releasing the preload on the rear spring WILL lower the bike, Once adjusted, The preload will probably work out fine for a lightweight rider too

You can also slide the forks up through the triple trees a little also but thats about it, If you cant lower it enough the next step is a lowering link or if you want to have some fun on the road just get some 17" rims, Spokes & tires to match, But as you mentioned you dont want to go all out then maybe the lowering link may be the best/cheapest/quickest option

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