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shock oil change

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I was told that I could bleed the nitrogen out of the shock, remove the damper cap on the top end of the shock, drain the oil, run kerosene or solvent in it and work it a few times to clean it out well and drain and install new oil then get a nitrogen recharge. does anyone know if that will work, the guy says he has done this many times but he isnt a mechanic.

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That video should be called how not to work on a rear shock.

I love the claw hammer, adjustable spanner and vice grips, bouncing the shim stack and piston across the worktop, screwdriver to drift off the locking collar etc. etc... truly horrific.

The honda manual would be a better option for instructions than this.

I was told that I could bleed the nitrogen out of the shock, remove the damper cap on the top end of the shock, drain the oil, run kerosene or solvent in it and work it a few times to clean it out well and drain and install new oil then get a nitrogen recharge. does anyone know if that will work, the guy says he has done this many times but he isnt a mechanic.

You can't do it like that. You need to pull it apart completely to bleed it properly. You don't need any special tools. You will need to get at least 40 psi in it as part of the bleeding process and then take it somewhere to get it gassed properly later. It's important to back all the clickers off. Also drain the oil through the compression adjuster hole before you pull the rod out or you'll be head to toe in oil.

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yeah, i noticed he forgot to mention to bleed the nitrogen out, and his oil fill level was listed as about as deep as the bladder, i did use the service manual, it was nice to see the video to help see the hands on though.

glad to say everything came apart fairly easy though, now i guess i clean it up and put it back together

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bleeding is the important part. take your time... this is pretty much what I do:

http://idriders.com/proflex/files/shock%20service.pdf

only difference is I turn the HS compression adjuster in and out a few times before I put the bladder in- you'll see bubbles appear and I do this until I don't see bubbles anymore (about 10 times).

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Also, you need a special schrader adapter in order to fill the bladder back to the specified pressure. What this adapter does is allowing you to remove it from the valve without losing any amount of pressure. Due to the high pressure and very low volume even the slightest amount of nitrogen escaping from the valve during removal will guarantee that you will end up with less than specified pressure.

I will post a picture of my adapter once I am back at home. I bought it online for something around 35 dollars.

Of course, you will also need to get your hands on a nitrogen bottle.

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Found it. This is what you will need: http://www.skygeek.com/ats-556.html. This part is important. If the bladder has less than 142PSI the oil will foam and cavitate and the shock will not work. If the bladder has more than 142PSI the shock will be harsh and you will also put undue pressure on the oil seals.

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I'm anal about being self-sufficient so have my own nitrogen set-up, but honestly if you're only servicing your own shock occasionally and there is someone near where you live who can gas it up it's hardly worth the investment. Just use a bike pump during the bleeding process and then take it to a shop to get it gassed to final pressure.

You are over simplifying the requirements. You need a nitrogen bottle, regulators, stop valve and accurate pressure gauge plus the no-loss schrader valve. I don't live in the US but very little change out of $300 I guess.

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You are over simplifying the requirements. You need a nitrogen bottle, regulators, stop valve and accurate pressure gauge plus the no-loss schrader valve.

It is easy to find a nitrogen bottle with regulators. All welding workshops will have one. What is hard to find is the no-loss schrader valve. That's why I provided the link above.

I will agree however that unless you know what you are doing and unless you have all the tools required you should not mess around with the rear shock.

Edited by jnk
typo

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That was just plain effed up. A horrible, horrible example of how to rebuild a shock :bonk:

Did you actually watch that???

Anyone else notice how collapsed and done his bladder was?

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It is easy to find a nitrogen bottle with regulators. All welding workshops will have one. What is hard to find is the no-loss schrader valve. That's why I provided the link above.

I will agree however that unless you know what you are doing and unless you have all the tools required you should not mess around with the rear shock.

I copied this for my nitrogen set-up

http://www.rzrforums.net/suspension/10042-check-your-nitrogen-level-shocks-here-how.html

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if they are regularly doing shocks then I'm sure they have a good setup and know what they are doing. run of the mill for any decent motorcycle shop.

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You might ask your local shop before you drop it off. A lot of shops in my area sublet all their shock work out. The Local KTM shop did most of the shocks no matter where they were dropped off.

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thanks to the link by mtrehy, for the manual, krannie for the video even though there was some bad advice on it, the shock rebuild went slick and it seems to work fine

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I found the video to be more informative than not. There are always suspension purists that have their own methods and tools, but the guy was trying to be helpful, and I've seen worse attempts at bike maintenance.

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