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Hone outer tube or shockbody?

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hey guys!

I read repeadiatly about honing fork tubes and was thinking whether this would harm the coating or not.

Let's talk just about the stock coating, no anodizided stuff.

Now I serviced a fork (showa 47) which has hone ruts. Looks pretty sweet!

The question is what is a proper honing tool for this?

I guess a 3-arm-hone isnt the way to go.

Flex Hones seem to be better IMO!

Does anyone use Flex Hones?

What size? Is a 45mm also usable for 48mm forks or vice versa?

Thanks!

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Im pretty sure the inside of the fork tubes are hard anodized and if you hone them, youre going to almost immediately take them out of spec. Even if you had over sized bushings you'd still have removed the hard coat that protects the relatively soft aluminum from the fork bushings themselves. The bushing that rides on the end of the fork tube would be the one that would be affected. The captive bushing that the slider rides on beneath the seal on the tube shouldn't need anything ever except to be replaced when you've got too much copper showing.

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At least one reply! =)

I would like to have more people to discuss!

Well, a lot of people think honing goes one in one with material taking away (dont know if you get my point), but it dont.

Looking closer to this, it depends on the kind of hone you use.

I talked about a flex hone, which just goes over the surface without any pressure (in contrast to a 3 arm hone eg).

You dont take material from the leg, you just treat the surface!

I dont think that stock forks are anodized.

This fork looks like a anodized one:

teamsuzuki10.jpg

Uploaded with ImageShack.us

Stock forks dont look like this.

Even if it is anodized I'm not sure if honing would harm the coating.

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All modern fork tubes are anodized on the inner surface. If they weren't they would wear out quickly like shock bodies did back in the eighties & early nineties. The whole point in anodizing is to provide a hard surface. Even a flex hone will remove anodizing. I'm not clear on what you are trying to accomplish?

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At least one reply! =)

I would like to have more people to discuss!

Well, a lot of people think honing goes one in one with material taking away (dont know if you get my point), but it dont.

Looking closer to this, it depends on the kind of hone you use.

I talked about a flex hone, which just goes over the surface without any pressure (in contrast to a 3 arm hone eg).

You dont take material from the leg, you just treat the surface!

I dont think that stock forks are anodized.

This fork looks like a anodized one:

teamsuzuki10.jpg

Uploaded with ImageShack.us

Stock forks dont look like this.

Even if it is anodized I'm not sure if honing would harm the coating.

those forks are not anodized, those are kashima coated. out of a normal humans price range. And as pointed out, even a flex hone will remove material. and you don't want to remove the anodizing inside the fork tubes.

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I always thought it is impossible to coat just the inner surface. If you coat, the coating always is on the whole part.

Kashima is more like brown colour?!

kashimabody.jpg

YZUpperForkTube.JPG.w560h172.jpg

This is anodized by a German company:

file.php?id=5042

file.php?id=5041

file.php?id=5043

In fact there are various coatings available and even the term "anodized" isnt that unique.

Those forks are "hardcoated", whereas normal forks....

Well, okay:

I just looked up the German Word "eloxieren", we call the stock coating so and I recognized that the English term for "eloxieren" is anodized.

So this "hardcoated" makes sense. Different words for different things... thats bad!

I'm just curious about honing because some Tuner do this. As I said, the Showa 47 out of a CRF 250 2009 which I serviced got also honed!

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I can see how a nice polish may help but honing sounds too aggressive

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There are many different types and levels of anodizing. Some is cosmetic and some of it is so hard its even difficult to grind off.

I found a heat sink once that was anodized black and the finish was so hard it dulled a drill bit and then I had to grind it off because it was completely dielectric too.

The shock body above is anodized for cosmetic on the outside and the inside was hard coated to prevent the piston band from attacking the cast aluminum that is very soft.

Separating the two types of anodizing on the same part is pretty easy. Its a simple electro-chemical process very much like chroming steel. To prevent an area from being plated, they just mask it off so the material cant deposit where you dont want it.

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