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Torque wrench suggestions.

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First off i don't know anything about torque wrench's except that it is necessary to get one if im going to be doing work on my own bike. My question is should i be getting a FT LB one... or a IN LB? Also what are some reputable brands for them? any and all suggestions/ info much appreciated.:bonk:

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Don't buy a torque wrench from Harbor Freight.

+1 to that. I once bought one there and took it back. Couldn't even tell when you had reached the desired torque. I bought a craftsman the same day and have been pleased with it.

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I've had excellent luck with Craftsman microtork torque wrenches. They are the most affordable US made torque wrenches available. For dirt bikes, I use the 25-250 inch/pound wrench 90% of the time and the 10-75 foot/pond wrench the other 10%.

Sears is having a great sale on them right now for only $45 each.

www.sears.com/craftsman-microtork-reg-torque-wrench-25-250-in-lbs-3-8-in/p-00944593000P

www.sears.com/craftsman-microtork-reg-torque-wrench-10-75-ft-lbs-3-8-in/p-00944594000P

BTW, if you get the Craftsman microtork wrenches, don't use the locking ring. It's made of plastic and if you twist the adjustment handle while the locking ring is engaged, it can be broken. The locking ring is unnecessary so just leave it alone. Otherwise they are high quality and very accurate tools. They are also made in the USA.

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Buy the best one you can afford. I prefer Snap-On but that's not everyone's cup 'o tea. These guys make Snap-On dial and clicker wrenches. You can buy from them a little cheaper than from the truck man. If you'll be working on your own bikes tools are an investment and the best you can afford is a good one.

Don't know what bike you're working on but I'd recommend a 1/4" drive in-pd and 3/8" ft-pd for starters.

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For most motor stuff you want the 1/4 drive. Some suspension bolts and a few engine things (e.g, primary drive gear nut) will get up into the 3/8 drive range.

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Don't buy a torque wrench from Harbor Freight.

I second this.....

I work for an Aircraft company with a certification lab, which can check a variety of types of torque wrenches. The Harbor Freight one I bought & tried was ALL OVER the chart as far as torque values were concerned. One pull would net a torque reading 10-20% higher than it was set, while the next pull, or while set at a different value, might be 10% lower than it should. It was inconsistent as all get out, and never did hit within the 3% range that I believe it said it would..... :bonk:

I bought a CDI brand. Owned by Snap-On, well made, and as a real bonus, is VERY accurate.

My point here is that if you're going to bother to torque something important, you should strive for accuracy. Both in your tightening technique, and with your tool. Use a good accurate torque wrench, and use it right. Otherwise, you may as well simply use a rachet or breaker bar with a socket. Which would probably be more accurate than a cheap torque wrench anyway......

Jimmie

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I've had excellent luck with Craftsman microtork torque wrenches. They are the most affordable US made torque wrenches available. For dirt bikes, I use the 25-250 inch/pound wrench 90% of the time and the 10-75 foot/pond wrench the other 10%.

Sears is having a great sale on them right now for only $45 each.

www.sears.com/craftsman-microtork-reg-torque-wrench-25-250-in-lbs-3-8-in/p-00944593000P

www.sears.com/craftsman-microtork-reg-torque-wrench-10-75-ft-lbs-3-8-in/p-00944594000P

BTW, if you get the Craftsman microtork wrenches, don't use the locking ring. It's made of plastic and if you twist the adjustment handle while the locking ring is engaged, it can be broken. The locking ring is unnecessary so just leave it alone. Otherwise they are high quality and very accurate tools. They are also made in the USA.

I was ready to run out and buy one of these (sale ends on the 29), but the reviews on the Sears website are terrible.

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Amazon had good prices for CDI torque wrenches; bought one a couple weeks ago.

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I was ready to run out and buy one of these (sale ends on the 29), but the reviews on the Sears website are terrible.

I own one of the Craftsman utorks, and I also own a Proto dial type, and some other no-names or maybe even a Kobalt. But I don't use any of that stuff anymore.

I went and bought a Craftsman digital ratcheting and it is all I use on bikes, cars, mountain bikes. I wouldn't waste my money on anything else if I had to do it over, yes it is more expensive, but it is easy to use and accurate.

Edited by Chaconne
spell

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ft lb for doing top ends and such. craftsman makes a good one

I would recommend an inch pound wrench. 1 ft lb = 12 in lb Most beginners have problems over tightening/stripping small bolts like pressure plate bolts, triple clamp pinch bolts, etc. Get a 200 in lb wrench. That will handle top end work too.

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I was ready to run out and buy one of these (sale ends on the 29), but the reviews on the Sears website are terrible.

Did you notice that 25 out of 68 reviews gave it 5 stars?

The Craftsman microtork wrenches use a plastic locking ring that can be broken if you twist the adjuster while the locking ring is locked. The locking ring is an unnecessary feature so it's easy to avoid this. My 10 year old Craftsman 25-250 inch/pound wrench gets used almost daily and I've always left the locking ring in the unlocked position. It always works flawlessly and it's still in calibration. It isn't an idiot proof tool, but is a very accurate tool that will last a very long time if handled properly.

At $45, nothing else comes close. I guarantee that you'll love the tool as long as you leave the locking ring unlocked.

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Did you notice that 25 out of 68 reviews gave it 5 stars?

The Craftsman microtork wrenches use a plastic locking ring that can be broken if you twist the adjuster while the locking ring is locked.

Yup, I found that out the hard way long ago. But since it's CRAFTSMAN, could you take it back for a free replacement? The numbers are getting hard to read on mine too. Accuracy seems fine so I guess it's a good buy compared to spending 5 times as much for Snap-on.

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The numbers are getting hard to read on mine too.

After 10 years of use, my Craftsman inch/pound wrench is getting hard to read too. I should go ahead and get a new one while they are just $45.

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Most auto parts stores will loan you tools like torque wrenches for free. I borrowed one and ended up not using it and tightened by feel instead. I've heard that many experienced mechanics don't use torque wrenches. I've found that using a torque wrench to service manuals specs didn't feel tight enough and I ended up tightening by feel instead. Never had anything strip or come loose including top end jobs and splitting cases.

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