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cylinder nuts inaccessible with torque wrench

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as i'm rebuilding my top end today, i realized that i cant get to the cylinder nuts with a ratchet+socket, even with an extension. bike is an rm 85. i can use a wrench (12mm), but i dont get enough leverage and it slips. i will be attempting to heat up the nuts tomorrow and going at it with a vise grip, but when i put it back together, how do yall think i should go about tightening it to the correct torque? i believe i need 18 ft-lbs.

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Find thin wall sockets, please don't put vise grips anywhere near your engines...

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The correct tool is a torque adapter. Looks like this:

Torque-Adapter-916-38-Drive-1Q811_AS01.JPG

Or if you or someone you know has welding skills you can make one out of a box end wrench and an adapter, cut wrench weld on adapter.

When using an attachment like this just keep it at a 90* angle to the torque wrench and no torque conversion is needed.

Were the nuts rounded before you started this task, if the answer is no I would get better wrenches, and no matter what the answer was I would get new one before reinstalling.

At this point if it is all you can grip the nuts with is a visegrip then that ia what you will have to use.

If you cannot get or make a torque adapter there is an alternate torque method. First runn all the nuts down snug by hand, then turn each nut 1/4 turn using a star tightening pattern, repeat until all fasteners are tight. You can go by feel or use the torque wrench on another bolt set at desired torque and compare the effort required.

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Crows foot wrench? Closed end of the wrench for better grip?

edit: beat me to it.

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what about a combo wrench? Ive also put a standard cheap wrench on a grinder to shave away enough of the wrench to slip safely over. Are you using a shallow socket? Maybe you can use a shallow 1/4" drive 12mm. Ive never known a manufactr to make inaccesible cylinder studs so dont go about using a torch, heat or whatever. Do you have a manual? Whatever you do, take your time, use the right tools. You will become a better mechanic, and your bike will thank you for it as well as be worth more at resale time...

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i shouldn't have to. i just cant get the socket onto the nut without the socket hitting the side of the cylinder

2 st? Right?

One or more of the cylinder nuts is usually in an area that is recessed or under the powervalve cover and there is no way to get a socket and ratchet in there. The only thing you can get on the nut with is a box or open end wrench.

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just went out and checked, none of my 12mm sockets will fit, 1/4" 3/8" or 1/2" drive. the nuts arent really rounded, i tried all 4 of them and slipped once on each of them and figured i better stop before i really mess things up. i'll be going to the hardware store tomorrow so ill have to get one of those torque adaptors you speak of.

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2 st? Right?

One or more of the cylinder nuts is usually in an area that is recessed or under the powervalve cover and there is no way to get a socket and ratchet in there. The only thing you can get on the nut with is a box or open end wrench.

Exactly

Box end wrench, criss cross pattern, slowly working them on. Helps if you have a good feel for torque but the best advice is don`t force it. If you`re blowing a gasket reafing on the wrench your turning too hard. You can feel when a bolt is fully seated.

If your bolt is too rounded off for a box end a socket isn`t going to be any better anyways.

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just went out and checked, none of my 12mm sockets will fit, 1/4" 3/8" or 1/2" drive. the nuts arent really rounded, i tried all 4 of them and slipped once on each of them and figured i better stop before i really mess things up. i'll be going to the hardware store tomorrow so ill have to get one of those torque adaptors you speak of.

Not a very common tool to find in a store. I got my sets from a tool distributor (think SnapOn, Matco).

The one I showed was a Proto brand, not equal to SnapOn, but a decent brand of tool, and it was found on the Grainger web-site.

Just found the Posse brand on amazon for under 10 bucks eaCH 12 AND 14 MM.

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Exactly

Box end wrench, criss cross pattern, slowly working them on. Helps if you have a good feel for torque but the best advice is don`t force it. If you`re blowing a gasket reafing on the wrench your turning too hard. You can feel when a bolt is fully seated.

If your bolt is too rounded off for a box end a socket isn`t going to be any better anyways.

Right I would probably go snug with everything seated, the wrench pressing pretty firm into the hand then 1/4 turn past that. That method of torque is called "wrench arc" usually given in degrees.

That is if I didn't have torque adapters!

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MOTION PRO $14.99

Comes with instructions on how to use with a torque wrench.

08-0134.jpg

i have one of these also, and is a handy tool to have around, makes life alot easier

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I bought a set of crowfoot wrenches just today at Harbor Frieght. Generally I steer clear of there,but I figured why not for something that I will use so sparadicly. Got a 9 piece metric set for $10. Was gonna go with my usual Craftsman,but they were $50. Oh and I cut a coupon out of my DirtRider mag and got a free 6 piece screwdriver set. Can't beat the price for a set to keep around in the house.

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I bought a set of crowfoot wrenches just today at Harbor Frieght. Generally I steer clear of there,but I figured why not for something that I will use so sparadicly. Got a 9 piece metric set for $10. Was gonna go with my usual Craftsman,but they were $50. Oh and I cut a coupon out of my DirtRider mag and got a free 6 piece screwdriver set. Can't beat the price for a set to keep around in the house.

For the application the OP is referring to crowsfeet did not work for me on my GG 300. In fact I have yet to find an application for crowsfeet on the bikes.

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For the application the OP is referring to crowsfeet did not work for me on my GG 300. In fact I have yet to find an application for crowsfeet on the bikes.

Torquing the clutch onto a 99 Mini Adventure is one application. Nut/kickstart gear is 15mm with only two flat sides. Only way I see to torque it to spec is using a crowfoot.

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