Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  

Go Pro Discussion

Recommended Posts

Just wanted to ask everyone using a Go Pro what settings and mounting positions they are using.

I got a Go Pro Hero for Christmas, but have not opened it up because I am going to exchange it for the Hero2 Go Pro.

I like the chest mount idea as I think the view looks better once you watch the videos. I was also thinking about a handlebar mount but am worried about the vibration.

What settings are you using and which camera do you have??

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I started with the top of the helmet mount using 1080, went to a chest mount using 1080 and 960 and could never get it aimed where it looked good both sitting and standing. Now i'm back to the top of the helmet but using 960.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have the old version of the Hero Motorsports mounted to my helmet on the chinguard and have beat the heyall out of it. It has been knocked off a couple of times but the old mount are still working. I pop riveted the receiver to a piece of stainless steel and tie banded that to the chin strap so I can take it off and remount to another helmet whenever required. It is set in upside down mode and I use the supplied J mount (?) to attach to the reciever.

It gives a pretty good POV shot, a little more natural view than mounting to the top of the helmet but that is just my opinion, and like they say, opinions are like motorcycles, we all have one or two...BTW, I have never found it an impediment either due to weight or vision.

DSC07063.jpg

DSC07059.jpg

DSC07065.jpg

DSC07056.jpg

Edited by tafkaoe

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I use front fender, rear fender and side of the chin bar for filming.

Only on setting 5, for the clearest playback possible.

For the ice I am making some low mounts for the lower fork pinch bolts. I want video of the bikes in front of me with a sweet angle. I will need to make a low one for the rear view also.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
ya that chin mount gives a good view. i could never do that to my helmet tho.

When I cut the zip ties the only evidence of attachment is the clean spot on the front of the chinbar.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

chest mounts blow...i hate watching videos where the camera is mounted that low. i dont like the side of the helmet either. the view from the top of the helmet is good, but the camera is more vulnerable there when riding tight singletrack. to me , the best location is the chin. i use the wrist strap to attach it to the chin of my helmet.

http://www.amazon.com/dp/B004AV5VCW/ref=asc_df_B004AV5VCW1840145?smid=ATVPDKIKX0DER&tag=hyprod-20&linkCode=asn&creative=395093&creativeASIN=B004AV5VCW

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
When I cut the zip ties the only evidence of attachment is the clean spot on the front of the chinbar.

Ha Ha....what's he talking bout? "I could never do that to my helmet?"

One day, I had my chinbar hog-tied for two hours during a hare scramble. She almost suffocated to death!! :bonk:

Hurry call PETH (People for the Ethnical Treatment of Helmets)!!

Oh BTW, I make my helmet sleep alone in the gearbag with the lights off!! She hasn't left me yet, it only makes her more willing to please when it's showtime!!!

Seriously, That is a great location for the go pro. I like the picture better on the helmet than the chest mount, but in the woods it always gets knocked out of adjustment by limbs etc if mounted on top of the helmet.

A friend of mine was telling me about a homemade plexiglass mount for the front of the "chinbar." Does anyone have any pics of another chin mount?

Also, tafkaoe has the right idea by making the mount transferrable between helmets. I don't know how many times I've been riding w my buddies and thought I wish they could video me, but then I realized not too many people can ride fast enough to keep up with me...Ha HA....nah just kidding, I was thinking I wish they would video me but they don't don't have a helmet mount and who wants to swap sweaty helmets?

I would like to see someone elaborate on the "chinbar" mount with zipties, velcro straps, or 1/4 turn D rings like on airbox side covers? This mount utilizes the best picture....imho!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
i like it on the top of my helmet.

i record in 720p 60fps or in 1080p.

X2, I got the Hero2 for christmas & the lcd bacpac which was a HUGE upgrade form the 960 that I had. But some 120fps WVGA never hurts, really cool watching all the slow motion

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

r3 is the best setting, 720p at 60fps...

^also looks the best when uploaded to youtube.

960 is square and looks retarded

1080 only shoots 30 fps and looks the same as 720 when uploaded to the internet

r3 720p 60fps

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

OP Thanks for posting, I got the hero for Christmas to and was wondering what was the best mode. Just playing with it in my den I figured R3 looked the best. As said above.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I prefer the R3 mode (1280x720 @ 60p). My experiments show that 1080p doesn't really give any better resolution than 720. The sensor and/or glass just doesn't support that resolution (the Hero2 should be somewhat better, however). I also have a 1920x1080 @ 60p camcorder that produces much higher quality. I have made videos with a mixture of 1080 camcorder, 1080 helmet camera, and 720 camera. The 1080 camcorder is far superior to the helmet camera footage. I can't see any difference in the 1080 vs 720 helmet camera footage. So I place 60p higher priority than higher resolution.

I like recording at 60p so I can do slow motion or pan/zoom without stuttering or interlace artifacts. When I render for Internet it gets converted to 30p, and for BluRay disk it gets converted to 60i, but at least I have clean 60p source for editing.

I generally mount on top of the helmet. It has its drawbacks, but it gives a reasonable view. A chin mount or under visor mount may be ideal, but I haven't tried that yet.

I don't like the chest harness mount. It is more convenient and easier to use, but it gets too much handblebar and is not good if you are sitting.

I also run a stabilizer program on all of my source. I use VirtualDub with the Deshaker plugin. It not only stabilizes the image, but it compensates for the rolling shutter "jello" effect, which I find really annoying.

I don't like helmet side mount because when I stabilize the video it makes the visor bounce around. Here is a sample that shows before and after stabilization:

http://vimeo.com/24266538

My other videos are also posted on Vimeo, in case you get bored.

Spending some time editing really makes a video more interesting to watch. I find that un-edited helmet camera footage gets boring pretty quickly.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I also run a stabilizer program on all of my source. I use VirtualDub with the Deshaker plugin. It not only stabilizes the image, but it compensates for the rolling shutter "jello" effect, which I find really annoying.

I don't like helmet side mount because when I stabilize the video it makes the visor bounce around. Here is a sample that shows before and after stabilization:

http://vimeo.com/24266538

Man, that definitely makes a difference, where can I get a program like that? And what does it roughly cost? I started to google it but was afraid what would come up if I put "video deshaker".:bonk:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

VirtualDub and Deshaker are free applications for the PC. They are pretty complex tools, and it takes a little time to learn to use it, but it provides the best stabilization I have seen yet. I started a thread on this topic on KTMtalk with some links to my set-up files and instructions.

http://ktmtalk.com/index.php?showtopic=437262

I have also found that the stabilization tool built into the later version of Sony Vegas Movie Studio (and Pro) do a fairly good job. I don't think they compensate for rolling shutter, but for short clips it is a faster way to get the footage stabilized.

Many modern video editors now have a stabilization tool built in, but for the most part, I haven't found them to work very well - other than the new Sony Vegas one.

I have also noticed that some people ride much smoother than my family, and therefore don't need stabilization as much as I do.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

lots of good info here. I can't wait to get out and play with the camera.

Saw this video on You Tube today, really love all the different camera angles they have.

I think it will be fun to try different mounting locations and try and get a good edit together.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
r3 is the best setting, 720p at 60fps...

^also looks the best when uploaded to youtube.

960 is square and looks retarded

1080 only shoots 30 fps and looks the same as 720 when uploaded to the internet

r3 720p 60fps

....................+1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

JBone and FamilyRider said it best, R3 mode for sure on the hero 1. I just got my hero 2 and havent really tested it but i'm sure i'll use the most similar setting. Nothing under 60 fps

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  

×