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Pipe musings.

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So,I'm thinking of pulling the dents yet again on my stock pipe(which I happen to like) or maybe it's just time for a new one.Does anyone know what gauge the stock pipe is?I'm considering an FMF or procircuit replacement but would like something at least as durable as stock.Any other ideas?Thanks.

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Funny I read this now. I have spent the last 2 hours with a pry bar trying to bend my pipe back to where it at least rests on the cylinder semi-straight. Whatever gauge it is, it is thick. I am beat!

The Gnarly is a thicker gauge, pretty sturdy pipe. It also gives you more on the low end but suffers on the top. I will be sticking with the stock until the metal fatigues to the point of breaking. After that, I will need to start rebending and popping the dents out of all my other pipes.

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Lol,that's sort of my problem,I've pulled them enough times there are thin spots here and there.A couple places just happened to develop pin holes a while back which I welded over but I'm staring to think maybe it's time for a new one.BTW,a o/a torch is your friend when it comes to the stock one :bonk:

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So,I'm thinking of pulling the dents yet again on my stock pipe(which I happen to like) or maybe it's just time for a new one.Does anyone know what gauge the stock pipe is?I'm considering an FMF or procircuit replacement but would like something at least as durable as stock.Any other ideas?Thanks.

You sir would rejoice in a DEP armored pipe. It's the only pipe that even compares with the stocker and it's just as tough.

Can I get an amen on that my brothers!:bonk:

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You sir would rejoice in a DEP armored pipe. It's the only pipe that even compares with the stocker and it's just as tough.

Can I get an amen on that my brothers!:bonk:

Thanks,I just searched it but couldn't find the gauge spec.Is it thicker than the Gnarly or PC's heavier pipe? I withhold my amen while I await more info:)

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An easy way to put a smashed pipe back to new is to cut it in half where the dent is,use a Harbor freight pipe expander to round both sides back out,then weld back together.

I did one a few weeks back that was flat smashed against the frame,fits like a new pipe now.(Had to slice it into 4 parts right out of the exhaust port.)

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Thanks,I just searched it but couldn't find the gauge spec.Is it thicker than the Gnarly or PC's heavier pipe? I withhold my amen while I await more info:)

I'm not sure. But I have a Gnarly and a DEP. The DEP seems to resist damage better than a Gnarly IMO.

The flip side is that a DEP is a much better pipe performance wise.

Win win.

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I think the stock pipes have thin metal compared to most aftermarket pipes. I've never actually measured any of them.

My perception is that the PC platinums I've been running can take a crash slightly better than the OEM pipes, but they will still dent and bend. I had an FMF SST, it's a terrible pipe for the YZ250, but seems to hold up better than the stocker to crash damage.

Eventually I'll get my hands on a DEP and try it out. Everyone gives them such rave reviews and the dyno numbers very impressive.

If you're into doing your own pipe repair, why not just use one of your old wasted pipes to beef up another one? You could cut matching sections out of one pipe along the seams and weld them over the same section of another. The FMF Gnarly for the CR500R is a good example of what I mean. It has a small patch on the exposed front of the headpipe that helps it resist dents and adds some strength.

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Thanks,that's good info.Fixing it isn't a problem but maybe I'm just looking for an excuse to replace it-lol.

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