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Do it yourself shock rebuild ?

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Anybody rebuild / revalve their shock instead of paying an undetermined amount of cash to have somebody do it ? Was thinking purchasing all of the parst and giving it a try myself. Just did my forks on my 04 CRF450r and it was a breeze. How much harder can the shock be ? If anybody has some input I would appreciate it. Don't want to end up buying a new shock.

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Difficult for one is impossible for another and easy for a third.

How “easy” it would be for you know one will be able to tell you.

Your bike should have a Showa 50 mm shock, not one of the more difficult ones to do.

And the physical disassembly and reassembly of the parts are only part of the job. experience with identifying wear or damage, experience with what valving or other modifications need to be done to get the results you’re looking for is a larger part.

If your just doing an oil change and basic check for wear.. Many home wrenches are capable of doing that.

If you want to modify the valve, or shim stacks and following a known build or recipe, again many are capable of that.

Do you have a Ni charging station? Or have a local shop that will charge the shock at a reasonable cost?

Have you watched a few help videos to see if the work done is something you think your capable of?

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Difficult for one is impossible for another and easy for a third.

How “easy” it would be for you know one will be able to tell you.

Your bike should have a Showa 50 mm shock, not one of the more difficult ones to do.

And the physical disassembly and reassembly of the parts are only part of the job. experience with identifying wear or damage, experience with what valving or other modifications need to be done to get the results you’re looking for is a larger part.

If your just doing an oil change and basic check for wear.. Many home wrenches are capable of doing that.

If you want to modify the valve, or shim stacks and following a known build or recipe, again many are capable of that.

Do you have a Ni charging station? Or have a local shop that will charge the shock at a reasonable cost?

Have you watched a few help videos to see if the work done is something you think your capable of?

+1

except Ni is Nickel, Nitrogen is N :bonk:

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theres a bunch of vids on youtube showing dismantling/assembling rear shock. the one i watched the guy was kinda crude on his choice of tools some may say. looked pretty easy thou. well for me that is!:bonk:

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+1

except Ni is Nickel, Nitrogen is N :smirk:

Yup, if I was referencing the periodic table :busted:

But I was using a common abbreviation for Nitrogen, and Ni is common, N is not. so :awww::banana:

:bonk:

And Besides, everybody knows the real use of Ni is not in reference to a metal or gas.

The Knights who say Ni are a band of knights from the comedy film Monty Python and the Holy Grail, feared for the manner in which they utter the word "ni" ( /ˈni/, like knee but clipped short). They are the keepers of the sacred words: Ni, Peng and Neee-Wom

:bonk:

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shock is easier than forks. not sure what shock you have but normally theres no special tools needed. just everyday toolbox items. get a manual thats specific for your bike and you wont have no trouble

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thanks for the input.. got it partially disassembled.. so far a breeze. just figured i would go for it. thanks for the replies !!

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Yup, if I was referencing the periodic table :bonk:

But I was using a common abbreviation for Nitrogen, and Ni is common, N is not. so :smirk::bonk:

:banana:

And Besides, everybody knows the real use of Ni is not in reference to a metal or gas.

The Knights who say Ni are a band of knights from the comedy film Monty Python and the Holy Grail, feared for the manner in which they utter the word "ni" ( /ˈni/, like knee but clipped short). They are the keepers of the sacred words: Ni, Peng and Neee-Wom

:busted:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QTQfGd3G6dg&feature=youtube_gdata_player

Deserved a link I thought.

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*Easy* is a relative term. I've had to repair quite a few shocks people have tried to "rebuild" by themselves. Just remember, youtube videos are a great source of entertainment and people have been injured and even died due to a shock not being assembled correctly.

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alot of people should never own a toolbox/tools, let alone attempt a suspension rebuild. he did say he tackled the forks with no trouble. i can only assume he did everything correct. if he can do the forks he wont have no trouble with the shock. regardless how smart he thinks he is, i would still use the service manual if i was him. alot of things can go wrong if you get over confident. done several suspension rebuilds myself and i still use the manual

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people have been injured and even died due to a shock not being assembled correctly.

:bonk: Uhh, ok.. I'm all about setting realistic excitations for this task and Ill be the first one to say (think I was) easy for one is impossible for another.. But , please point us to the article, investigation where you read about someone dying form a misassembled shock on a motorcycle? Or even injured? Which is somewhat believable, Im sure more than one idiot has unscrewed a clevis without removing the spring or preload and got hit in the head, arm, hand.. Same for failing to relieve gas pressure and getting a face full of oil or damping rod.. So while Ive never met such an ill informed person, I have at least read about such things.,., But a shock killing someone :smirk:

I suppose someone has been killed with a jelly doughnut as well…. I mean anything is possible. :banana:

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the hardest part of shock rebuilt is bleedind off all the air and close the shock.if you make by yourserf a service on shock and remain air bubble in the shock is worse then before.

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i was a helicopter mechanic... kind of gave me the motivation. i figured if i can rebuild and service a strut on a blackhawk... dirt bike should be no prob. the only thing is.. i was shown how to rebuild a strut before i attempted it and had somebody on hand for advice. well i have it disassembled.. just waiting for the parts to arrive on wednesday. will post the results. catastrophic failure isn't a worry... poor performance is a concern. worst come to worse i have to pay for a service.. vs. rebuild and that is still a hell of a lot cheaper

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Here in Georgia, a friend of mine had a CR125 that a nationally known company had revalved previously. During a practice day at the local SX track, the shaft nut had backed off enough that, when he hit the next jump face, it ripped the last thread off the end of the shaft- instant "no rebound damping". He went over the bars due to the back end kicking up. I don't know exactly *what* happened during the crash but when they got to him his goggles were full of blood and he couldn't even begin to stand up. He got a very expensive helicopter ride to Georgia Baptist hospital where they reconstructed his left cheek and bolted his pelvis back together. He stayed there 3 weeks before he got released.

James Ebmro is running the Dakar this year. Local guy who owns a construction company and a Husaberg/Beta/Gas Gas dealer (www.theraceshop.com). He ran it back in 2006 with the help if Elmer Symons who was his mechanic for the entire race. He had been supplying Elmer a place to live while he was living here in the USA. Elmer had also been racing in the BITD series in the Pro class doing very well. In 2007 Elmer entered the Dakar as a competitor. Elmer was doing well in the Dakar when he went over the bars doing about 80mph. When they got Elmers bike back to James' house here in Georgia, you could see how the shock wasn't exiting the body anywhere near the correct angle. Upon disassembly, you could plainly see the nut had backed off. Elmer and James had started the Dakar both on virtually completely stock KTM rally bikes they had taken delivery of once they got to Europe that year. Neither had any time to do any set up work. Elmer had revalved the shock after one of the previous sections.

Here's the first link I found:

http://www.visordown.com/motorcycle-news--general-news/dakar-rider-elmer-symons-dies-on-fourth-stage/431.html

Nobody said or implied the original poster did or didn't have the ability to rebuild the shock. I'm merely saying there are potential serious safety repercussions for less-than-acceptable work. Riding motorcycles can be dangerous enough when mechanical issues don't complicate patters.

Don't know why the story mentions Elmer riding a Yamaha. Him and James were both riding KTM's that year.

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Then there was the gentleman who reported here that he had removed the clevis from a KYB shock without relieving the nitrogen pressure (N, not Ni). The result was that the rebound adjuster needle, which is what, about 5 inches long, was propelled across the room on a stream of oil and stuck an inch into the opposite wall.

There are dangers involved.

  • Haha 1

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Then there was the gentleman who reported here that he had removed the clevis from a KYB shock without relieving the nitrogen pressure (N, not Ni). The result was that the rebound adjuster needle, which is what, about 5 inches long, was propelled across the room on a stream of oil and stuck an inch into the opposite wall.

There are dangers involved.

There are for sure.. , But my point is and was..

the why the death and serious injury was presented was a complete overstatement, implied if not stated. IMHO.

Hammers are dangerous too. As are , screw guns, table saws, ice on the drive way... and you know,, Peds Docs say motorcycles are so dangerous, they should be outlawed for kids, and parents charged with child abuse if they let them ride :smirk: I disagree with that as well as overblown exaggerations.

The new home wrench should be careful with tools in general, and any new project.. more so with an assembly under spring and gas pressure :bonk: Don’t want to see anyone hurt, buts wanted to keep the concern in prospective.

And grayracer513 :lol: there have been several of those stories on this site alone. This being just one of many motorcycle forums, and most likely never tell the tale.. Id bet it happens a lot :lol:

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at the first shock when i bleed air from cadj i push the rod up and down slowly and look on cadj hole.........i push thee rod up a little strong and wash my face!!!!!!im lucky cause im peeled!!!not very dangerous but if i doesnt have the googles i can ruin my eyes

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the why the death and serious injury was presented was a complete overstatement, implied if not stated. IMHO.

How so? It can potentially be very dangerous. No implication when the article reports the death. Seems pretty accurate. A complete overstatement? I don't understand.

Your hand grip comes off when covering a whoop section. Safety implications there that are obvious to some of us when that grip even starts to move at all. That rebound needle that shot across the room and stuck in the wall. What if his eye was in the line of fire? Some things that are obvious to some are not to others. None of this is rocket science but some repairs should not be tried without some experienced help guiding the way.

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Since we're on the topic of unsecured shaft nuts, thought I'd ask what everyone is using to secure the nut after removal( type of replacement nut or thread locking agent, staking method etc)

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