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Can gasoline eventually ruin a carburetor?

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I have a 1983 Yamaha TT600 that’s been sitting for approx. 10 to 15 years. It ran great when I parked it. It was stored inside and looks in really good condition. I recently had a bike shop clean the carbs. They cleaned them, but told me the carbs are junk because gasoline has eaten away the aluminum. I didn’t know that gasoline could ruin carbs. I thought it just gummed them up and you could always clean/rebuild them. Can anyone give me some advice. Is the bike shop correct which means I need to try to find replacement carbs?

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The new gas with ethanol really does a number on carbs.

As someone pointed out, the carbs often have a magnesium float bowl with an aluminum body. I have completely torn down carbs, getting out every little rubber o-ring and part, then soaked them in carb cleaner. Then use a rebuild kit. New jets, new gaskets, new float valve. Now for a shop to do it, it might be cheaper and get a better carb by replacing it.

Look at the Vintage section. There is a thread on using Pinesol to clean out carbs and other parts. I just soaked two cylinder heads in Pinesol. There are some other "home remedies" there too.

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I think the shop is exagerating...just a little bit. My opinion is they are thinking, " We can't warranty this particular repair with these old corroded carbs, only with new ones."

Therefore, they give you this determination. I don't think it's IMPOSSIBLE to have a carb corroded beyond being able to save it with lots of labor. That's another reason whay they make this determination...the labor needed to save them.

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The new gas with ethanol really does a number on carbs.

As someone pointed out, the carbs often have a magnesium float bowl with an aluminum body. I have completely torn down carbs, getting out every little rubber o-ring and part, then soaked them in carb cleaner. Then use a rebuild kit. New jets, new gaskets, new float valve. Now for a shop to do it, it might be cheaper and get a better carb by replacing it.

Look at the Vintage section. There is a thread on using Pinesol to clean out carbs and other parts. I just soaked two cylinder heads in Pinesol. There are some other "home remedies" there too.

I'm fixing up my dad's old '83 Suzuki GS650G, and this is the way to go, hands down.

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Lots of carb cleaner is all we used at the mechanics course I did, after finishing the course with a few weeks to spare we got asked to fix the old mint condition 1960-something CB550R that hadn't been run in 15 years, just took out all parts and used many, many cans of carby cleaner.

THe petrol builds up some SERIOUS varnish, but you can get it off with time, and effort....

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Replacing rubber o-rings and seals, carb cleaner to dissolve any emulsion/resins, then they should be as good as new.

..a

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I’ve never heard of gasoline corroding a fuel bowl. It is usually water that does the dirty work. A white looking residue on the metal. The white stuff is not corrosion, but a build up of residue over time. Air does have moisture in it, and over time the moisture residue builds up on the metal. This residue can usually be cleaned off. This same residue builds up in the magneto area of 2t’s.

With ethanol in gas these days, it would be prudent to run the fuel out of the fuel bowl if storing the bike for more than a few weeks.

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