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On my 1990 kx250 there appears to be no mark for re timing them, the only thing i can see is one of the teeth on the gear is machine a touch lower than the rest on both of them? am i on the right track?

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This is a very helpful outline for timing the KIPS:

1988–92 KX250 and 1990-2000 KX500 KIPS Timing Procedure by Eric Gorr

The explanation of this procedure, written in the Kawasaki service manual, is confusing. It requires you to time the upper and lower racks at the same instant. My method of timing the exhaust valves is composed of simple steps that enable you to check your work as you go. The 1988–92 KX250 and KX500 use the drive-channel system to actuate the center valve. Here is the best way to time the KIPS on these models.

1. Set the cylinder upside down on a bench.

2. Install the center valve but don’t bolt it in!

3. Install the side drum valves and align the drive channels on the drum valves with the center valve, but don’t bolt it in!

4. Install the side drums valves and align the drive channels on the drum valves with the engagement pins on the center valve.

5. Lift up the drum valves so the bottoms of the gears are flush with the cylinder base. Take care not to disengage the center valve.

6. Slide in the rack from either side of the cylinder. Position the rack by installing the seal pack and pulling the rack out until it bottoms against the seal pack. This is the full-open position.

7. Drop the drum valves onto the rack so the valves are in the full-open position. Don’t pay attention to alignment dots or marks on the valve or rack just remember that the valves should be open when the rack is pulled out and closed when the rack is pushed in.

1992–97 KX125 and 1993-2000 KX250 KIPS Timing Procedure

The system used on the KX125 and KX250 uses both wedge and drum valves with racks. This is the best exhaust valve system for performance but the most difficult to maintain. Here are some tips for re-timing this KIPS system.

1. Install the wedge valves in the cylinder and the actuating rod and lever. Squirt some pre-mix oil on the parts.

2. Pull the wedge valve into the full-open position, place the gear on the end of the rod, and rotate the gear counterclockwise until the rack butts against the stop plate. Thread the nut on the rod and tighten it counterclockwise because it is a left-hand-thread nut.

3. Place the drum valves into their respective cavities until the top of the gears are level with the cylinder base. Now push the lower rack into place and bolt the seal pack on the rack into the cylinder.

4. Pull the rack out until it stops and push it in one millimeter; now it is in the correct position to install the drum valve. Before you push down the drum valves, make sure the wedge valve and drum valves are in the full-open position.

5. Push down the drum valve with the two gears first because it must engage the upper rack and lower rack simultaneously. Take care and be patient. You may have to wiggle the wedge valve yoke to get everything to fall into place. Never hammer the drum valves! Then push down the right drum valve and install the idler gear. Now install the bushings and check the system. The valves will bind and stick if you try to move the valves without the bushings installed, or if the cylinder is facing upside-down. Test the KIPS in this way, pull the rack outward until it stops, look through the exhaust port from the pipe side. The valves should be in the full open position. On cylinders where the base has been turned down more than .010 inches, the drum valve bushings will also need to be turned down to prevent the valves from binding when the cylinder is tightened.

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Thanks guys, I got it all back together nicely, started it up today and i still have pressure/ water spewing out of my radiator overflow, i put up another post the other day explaining this problem and the only thing i can think it is now is a crack somewhere in my head or cylinder as my radiators don't seem blocked my base and head gasket are new/ new piston and rings so on and so forth.

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Thanks guys, I got it all back together nicely, started it up today and i still have pressure/ water spewing out of my radiator overflow, i put up another post the other day explaining this problem and the only thing i can think it is now is a crack somewhere in my head or cylinder as my radiators don't seem blocked my base and head gasket are new/ new piston and rings so on and so forth.
Does it start spewing immediately? If you start it with the cap off, do you get bubbles in the coolant, especially when you rev the engine?

If so, the head gasket is leaking pressure into the cooling system. Check the gasket surfaces to make sure they are clean and flat.

Did you use any sealant like Coppercoat on the gasket?

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Does it start spewing immediately? If you start it with the cap off, do you get bubbles in the coolant, especially when you rev the engine?

If so, the head gasket is leaking pressure into the cooling system. Check the gasket surfaces to make sure they are clean and flat.

Did you use any sealant like Coppercoat on the gasket?

Yeah i tried it with the cap off and it seems to be bubbling round quite a bit, especially when reving, the cylinder was surfaced but i dont think i ever got my head done, and no i just used the steel gasket in the rebuild kit, sounds like it might be a good idea to surface my head and put some sealant on the gasket then try it again?

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Success! I re surfaced the head (using emery paper laying on a peice of glass applied that copper sealant and my radiators are no longer overflowing !! thanks heaps for your help people!.... oh and i put a new head gasket on that i had lying around lol

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