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Well, I think that's it, for now.

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I bought my '86 CR250 in April/may-ish last year (technically), after a few weeks my boss(es) decided they didn't like me and, well fired me.

After the last several months of struggling to buy gas (and oil :bonk:), I think my budget has had it.

Reality hit when I inspected my chain near the end of the riding season, being a year-round rider I was ready to go for another few months - my bike wasn't.

It turned out not only was my chain maxed out and still had 4-5" of freeplay above the plastic slider. But my rear sprocket was beyond damaged, to the point where many of the teeth were missing.

My parents fortunately offered to buy me a new set. So I spent a few days looking for the best price on the cheapest sets, individuals, 10 different sites, tons of different ratios and sizes. And the cheapest I could possibly come up with was a minimum of $105 for a front rear and chain. They said that they could buy that for me, but that it was going to be my Christmas. Knowing that in addition the the drivetrain set, it would need a new top-end and a new tank of gas (which would be around $240), I said forget it, bring on the games and clothes.

Soon after, I drained the rest of the oil, and covered Peggy up.

I do not plan on getting a job, for I am studying for college, and do not plan on having enough time for a job in college. I tried to sell it so that I could buy a worthwhile bike that would not need much maintenance, but the most I could get out of it was $500, and for the time and money I've spent on it it's just too low for me.

So I've think Peggy's had it. I've had a good (older) friend tell me that I needed to buy a Honda Elite, it would get me places, take me to college, cheap on gas, and reliable. But I'm hesitant to sell such a classic, especially in it's current non-working condition. If I was offered $500 when it ran perfect I might be lucky if I got $300, and that's simply not enough for ANY decent bike.

What do you think? Should I sell it? Keep it stored, wait til I'm done with college, and restore it 100%? Beg for money to get it working, sell it and buy a Honda Elite? I would love to hear your thoughts on my situation. And if you want to see the bike it's in my "garage".

Cheers, and happy New Years.

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When I went to college, I had nothing but free time. Classes a few days a week, which left me plenty of time for a part time job and free time for riding, partying, studying, etc..

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When I went to college, I had nothing but free time. Classes a few days a week, which left me plenty of time for a part time job and free time for riding, partying, studying, etc..

If you don't mind me asking, what kind of classes did you take? I plan on getting my AA in computer science/network administration, then move on to computer software engineering, if not get a Cisco or Microsoft certification. I do not know how work/study intensive these types of classes can be.

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I got a Bachelors in Business.

Hmm. I would like to say that that would be similar to the technology classes I will be taking but I just don't know. :bonk:

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It's all relative....it comes down to this: Full time college comes down to a few hours of classes a day over the week. There is definitely plenty of time to do everything you need and want. It is definitely good to put school first, but you need to have fun too, or else school will wear you out!

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It's all relative....it comes down to this: Full time college comes down to a few hours of classes a day over the week. There is definitely plenty of time to do everything you need and want. It is definitely good to put school first, but you need to have fun too, or else school will wear you out!

Sure, on the other hand, my father has this thing about me "getting a crappy job just to afford a car or motorcycle and working at that crappy job forever, and never being able to afford a family or decent house". So that's also a factor. But as you said it's relative, so I'll see what happens.

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Isn't that the point of going to college? It's not like we all go out into the world and get amazing jobs. Even with a degree, you have to start at the bottom.

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The best "crappy" job I ever had in college was working at a ski resort! Free skiing there and several other mountains and resorts. Just remember....crappy jobs can grow into everything you need it to be.

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Isn't that the point of going to college? It's not like we all go out into the world and get amazing jobs. Even with a degree, you have to start at the bottom.

Yeah, you'd change your mind if you saw our locals though. Usually uneducated, got married at 19, no college, some highschool, but found a "great job" at the coal mine or oil plant. Somewhat sad knowing they will never have any significant influence of people's lives. Like, they have no potential. My father being a writer/professor finds it a little baffling.

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The best "crappy" job I ever had in college was working at a ski resort! Free skiing there and several other mountains and resorts. Just remember....crappy jobs can grow into everything you need it to be.

That said above, I would LOVE to work at a ski resort while in college! But the closest one from my house is an hour and a half away from my house.... And as you might could tell, I don't have a way to get there :bonk:

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Yeah, you'd change your mind if you saw our locals though. Usually uneducated, got married at 19, no college, some highschool, but found a "great job" at the coal mine or oil plant. Somewhat sad knowing they will never have any significant influence of people's lives. Like, they have no potential. My father being a writer/professor finds it a little baffling.

That's not my point. My point is, just because you go to college, doesn't mean you graduate and start making all of the money in the world. You still start at the bottom of the totem pole, then work your way up. Has nothing to do with your town and your locals and what is available without being educated.

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Also, just because you work at Starbucks (hypothetical) while you are in college, doesn't mean you will work there for the rest of your life. Although, most businesses in service, retail, and hospitality have great growth potential.

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Also, just because you work at Starbucks (hypothetical) while you are in college, doesn't mean you will work there for the rest of your life. Although, most businesses in service, retail, and hospitality have great growth potential.

True true. I might be able to work something out. Hopefully the economy's gonna get better soon, I'd hate to be hired instead of a single mother on welfare :bonk:

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If it's important to you, and you're truly motivated, you will find time for work and study and play. It *is* possible.

Honestly, very few of us older folks really appreciated this when we were young, despite everyone telling us. Some did better than others, but the ones that worked harder are the ones that are doing well even in today's economy..

..a

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If you don't mind me asking, what kind of classes did you take? I plan on getting my AA in computer science/network administration, then move on to computer software engineering, if not get a Cisco or Microsoft certification. I do not know how work/study intensive these types of classes can be.

I'm going to jump in here and be the killjoy. I raced motocross full time until I left for college. I graduated with a degree in Computer Science. I work as a Software Engineer.

Many of my friends and roommates were Business/Marketing majors. They had upper-level courses in Communications and Marketing while I was taking courses in Artificial Intelligence and Cryptography. I don't want to discount Business/Marketing majors, but while they were out partying on Wednesday and Thursday nights (and still bringing home good grades), I was holed up in a room reading, studying and doing math full-time just to grasp the concepts required to get a passing grade. The amount of free time you have will likely differ depending on your major.

In the end, I had to stop racing entirely. I went trail-riding whenever I had some free time on the weekends. I don't regret it, as all the hard work has definitely paid off for me since I've graduated.

You WILL have free time while you're in college. With your choice of degree, you likely WILL NOT have as much free time as your friends that are in other fields of study.

If I had taken on a part-time job in addition to school, I would not have had any free time for riding my dirt bike.

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Once you get the items that need repairing taken care of, there will always be more things that need money thrown at it. Tires, levers, cables, handlebars, the next top end, the next chain and sprocket set, etc, etc. Its a never ending cycle. If you have somewhere to store the bike, it'll be worth hanging on to until you have the time and resources to maintain it yourself. Best way to learn is to do most of this yourself. With a good manual and proper instruction, you can rebuild virtually the entire bike as it needs it. The 1986 CR250 was a decent bike and would be worthy of keeping and fixing at a later date. The alternative is to give it away for close to nothing and then having to buy something for much more money. You can still get a new(er) bike later but you don'thave much to lose by hanging on to the old CR. Heck, it'll even be legal for some vintage racing classes!

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If you don't mind me asking, what kind of classes did you take? I plan on getting my AA in computer science/network administration, then move on to computer software engineering, if not get a Cisco or Microsoft certification. I do not know how work/study intensive these types of classes can be.

hahaha you'll have plenty of free time, trust me. I had 3 jobs during college (graduated 5 yrs ago) and that was with a double concentration (information technology + security) and minor in business AND had plenty of time for hobbies, drinking, and the ladies (though usually the last two were at the same time). Enjoy college and make sure you get your priorities in line. You can't be all work and no play for sure.

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I went to college, worked full time during it, and still found time to ride. Get a job kid, or stop complaining about not having money.

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