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WR250 or YZF250

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I am saleing my TTR 230 and planning on buying a bigger bike. I have rode a 450 and thats just to much for me. I will not be raceing just trail riding, sand dunes, and just playing on some small tracks for fun. I want a low maintence and have read the WR is lower maintence than the yzf. All that said I am kinda leaning towards the 250yzf but have heard so much good stuff about the wr250. Bottom line is I gotta have more power than the ttr230 and dont really want a 2 stroke. I am 27 and weigh 175 if that matters any.

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For one, the WRF is not any lower maintenance than a YZF. They are essentially the same motor, just with different cam timing, different ignition curves and a wide range gearbox. People may say they are lower maintenance because they do less maintenance on their WR, but that is negligence on their part, but this goes to show how good the Yamaha 250F motors are. Either the YZF or WR is going to be much, much more powerful than your TTR, and you will enjoy either motor. As for the riding you will be doing, it sounds like the WR would better suit your needs, as they run an open chamber fork and different valving in the shock, more suited to trail riding or play riding. The suspension valving on the WR is perfect for this type of riding, but is undersprung if ridden on a motocross track by a better than average rider. This can be fixed though, if you do go the WR route and want to ride the odd motocross track.

The YZF is also more than capable of doing what you want in a bike also, as well as being good to go if you want to ride at your local motocross track, but is set up out of the crate to be much better suited to be ridden at the motocross track. You may find it to be a bit stiff in the forks and shock, as well as having a more aggressive power delivery, but again, anything can be modified to suit the riding you are doing, it just costs money. Decision is up to you. Are you buying new or used ??

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Swapper, thanks for the info, I wish I could buy new but doubt I can afford a new one, trying to find a like new bike and have found some I am interested in.

You have gave me some good info, I rode my ttr230 on a track for fun this weekend and it was hrrible as far as handling on a track, the shocks suck.

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Are you talking about the WR-250F, the off-road bike based on the YZ-250F,

or,

Are you talking about the WR-250R, the street-legal dual-purpose bike?

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unless you plan on racing mx frequently, get the wr. Its a great do it all bike. With a simple twist of the clickers, the suspension can handle mx tracks. you can always take off the enduro parts to make it look YZish. If you like riding long distances, or not leaning your bike on a tree,go wr

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Are you talking about the WR-250F, the off-road bike based on the YZ-250F,

or,

Are you talking about the WR-250R, the street-legal dual-purpose bike?

WR250f

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I guess its just gonna depend n what I can find the best deal on, I dont want to get a piece of junk that was someone elses problem.

Is there a huge weight difference int the two bikes?

Also I just wanted to make sure the WR250f is gonna have more power than the ttr230.

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Eventhough the WR and YZ are "essentially the same motor", the problem is that most ride the piss out of the YZs at the track. The WR, being a trail bike, is more likely to be ridden in the woods at lower RPMs. Of course, the most important point is to know what you are looking for when you buy the bike. Most 250F MX bikes are ticking time bombs.

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A WR-250F of any year will have a lot more performance than your TT-R230.

One thing to keep in mind is that a WR-250F will have to be "uncorked" if you expect it to run as it is capable of since it rolls out of the shipping crate with restrictors over the airbox inlet, muffler outlet, lean carb jetting, and a throttle stop screw that allows only half-throttle.

It's easy to remedy that, and the info is all over this forum (Yamaha's own accessory catalogue even has an AIS Removal Kit which contains the parts and instructions to do so).

Going by Yamaha Motor Corp., USA's own specs, the 2012 WR-250F weighs 5 pounds more than the 2012 TT-R230.

In my experience, how much maintenance the bike requires is greatly dependant on what you do with it and how long you do it for.

If you ride it like a grandma only occasionally, you'd barely have to do anything to it during the course of a year.

If you ride from sunup to sundown two or three days a week and are wringing the throttle's neck like you're intent on showing the bike who's boss, you'll be doing lots of oil changes and air filter servicings, and if you refuse to do that stuff, you'll eventually blow the bike up, and it wouldn't matter what bike you rode or who manufactured it, 2- or 4-stroke.

If you are somewhere in between grandma and possessed psycho, you'll basically be doing the same stuff at about the same time no matter if you're on a YZ-250F, WR-250F, or your TT-R230.

My wrenching with my 2009 WR-250F since I bought the bike in November of 2009:

I ride a state forest trail loop on weekends (often doing both Saturday and Sunday).

I ride every weekend, save for crap weather.

Each loop is about 55 miles, and I usually do one loop per ride.

I estimate my bike has a bit over 2,000 miles on it, 98% of that from this trail loop.

My skill level is of average ability and aggression.

I service the air filter before each ride. Period.

I change the engine oil every 4 or 5 rides, and change the oil filter every other oil change.

I check the valve clearances once a year during the winter layover, and so far, no adjustment has been needed.

I lube the suspension bearings every three months, and the steering bearings twice a year.

Other than oil and oil filter changes and checking the valve clearances, I haven't had to go inside the engine to do anything.

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YZEtc, thanks for the info. I have no problem with keeping the regular maintence up such as oil, air filter, ect.. just didnt want a bike that i had to go into the motor all the time and rebuild.

What is considered a high mileage/hour bike? Is 50 hours considered new, just getting broke in, or halfway wore out?

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YZEtc, thanks for the info. I have no problem with keeping the regular maintence up such as oil, air filter, ect.. just didnt want a bike that i had to go into the motor all the time and rebuild.

What is considered a high mileage/hour bike? Is 50 hours considered new, just getting broke in, or halfway wore out?

That depends on the type of bike, are you talking about a WR250? For example, 50 hours is just broken in for a XR250/400. 50 Hours can be ALOT of hours for a 250 MX bike pinged off the rev limiter every ride. Regardless, you will never know how many hours a bike has unless you know the seller.

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thanks motorider, I am talking about a wr250f and a yzf250

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What is considered a high mileage/hour bike? Is 50 hours considered new, just getting broke in, or halfway wore out?

Depends on what the bike's already been through.

If it's ridden competitively on a motocross track or in some kind of off-road racing series (or ridden like it), it probably already has been apart for preventive maintenance, or at least should have been.

If it has been trail ridden for recreation and has been treated to the routine maintenance a dirt bike requires, that's not too bad and the engine is probably ready for more.

I know my WR-250F has more than 50 hours on it, and probably more like 80.

Myself, unless I felt certain the bike was in mint condition (especially if it's a few years old and has the usual tell-tale signs of being used and not just sitting around in somebody's garage), if I planned on buying the bike, I'd budget the time and money to go inside the engine and see for myself.

A good indication of how the bike was cared for is to have a look at the air filter and see what the condition of the inside of the rubber boot connecting airbox to the rear of the carburetor is like.

To me, it would not matter if it were a high-tech YZ-250F, WR-250R, air-cooled Honda XR or Yamaha TT-R, or whatever other year or model of dirt bike.

No dirt bike likes sucking in dirt and a lack of routine maintenance.

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Thanks alot, there is just so many bikes out there and I am sacred to get someone elses problem, but I am just gonna take my time and not rush into anything.

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Thanks alot, there is just so many bikes out there and I am sacred to get someone elses problem, but I am just gonna take my time and not rush into anything.

That is wise...know what to look for or take someone who does. I have only been screwed once and I learned my lesson.

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Its after the break in but its basically new. Watch out for 50hrs on new top end beacuse that doesnt mean the total hrs on the bike. in that case they probably rode the bike tons.

I would stay away from most motors that were rebuilt by a random person because there is a higher chance of it blowning up than a bike with low hrs.

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How the bike has been treated for those 50 hours will determine its state of repair.

I have a WR250F which has 60-70 hours. It gets oil changes every 4-5 hours and a clean filter before each ride. I use my bike for Enduro and Hare & Hound racing. Suspension has been set up solely for that. On an MX track...it sucks. Through the woods...it is a weapon.

I have a riding buddy who has an EXC250F. No (or very little) maintenance ever. He has had new cylinder, piston and all the valves replaced. Every day he goes out, something else falls off.

Do you get the point of this story......

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Thanks guys, I am trying to stay away from the bikes that have been raced or have been heavily modded. I really want a low hour bike that is bone stock.

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Thanks guys, I am trying to stay away from the bikes that have been raced or have been heavily modded. I really want a low hour bike that is bone stock.

I think you are definitely heading in the right direction with that line of thought. If you can find a bike that was casually ridden, preferably by someone older and slower, you are going to end up with a great bike. One piece of good advice that I try and offer also, is not to buy the first bike that you see. It may be great, but at least have a look at a couple of others to get a good idea of what bikes in different condition look like. As for the 50 hour argument, I was rebuilding my 250F's at 40 hours, and at 80 hours, you need a new barrel as they go out of round very quickly due to the short stroke. Other major engine components should be replaced at a similar time also. I would try and buy something with much less than 50 hours on it if you can.

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