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Need help with a valve adjustment

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I went to adjust my valves myself this weekend for the first time and I had a few issues. First the crank access cover stripped out, so I had to resort to putting the bike in 3rd and lining up the timing mark that way. After a few trials I got what I thought was TDC. So, my second issue was the intake valves are not loose like the exhaust ones are. As I rotated the tire I watched for the exhasut to close then the intake. The timing make is right were it should be. Am I doing anything wrong?

I used the DR650 valve adjustment procedure off of

, it said both sets of valves should be loose when at TDC. Is it possile the PO had over tighten the intake if he had ever readjusted them?? I don't want to mess up my little pig.

Is there a way of getting the crank access cover off after it strips out without taking the whole cover off? I know enough once I reassemble the cover to use anti-seize compound on Aluminum Parts. I just wished Suzuki knew that.

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Hey bud that sucks about the crank cover. All I do when i do my valves is remove the spark plugs so its easier to turn over the engine, remove the inspection plug for the timing mark, put the bike on a stand and rotate the rear tire in 3rd until I can can see the T though the insp hole. You have to remember that the bike is a 4 stroke so depending where the engine stopped at you may need to rotate the crank a few times (the T could pass the hole a few times) when the T is lined up with the insp hole and you can wiggle both the intake and exhaust rocker arms than your good, TDC. Then brake our the feeler guages.

2011 DR650,

Nova Scotia, Canada.

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images?q=tbn:ANd9GcRuZwv4jRrnMM2_cmsphczaQpBuuZOoSnD7gEwv-_SOuPwAdXXC

This is what you should see through the insp hole, but you may be required to rotate the crank a few full rotations to be able to wiggle both the intake and exhaust rockers.. All depending what stroke the engine is on when you shut down the bike.

Heres a link step by step on what to do:http://www.offroadexplorer.com/Forum/viewtopic.php?f=58&t=1856&start=0

hope all works out.

2011DR650

Nova Scotia, Canada

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images?q=tbn:ANd9GcRuZwv4jRrnMM2_cmsphczaQpBuuZOoSnD7gEwv-_SOuPwAdXXC

This is what you should see through the insp hole, but you may be required to rotate the crank a few full rotations to be able to wiggle both the intake and exhaust rockers.. All depending what stroke the engine is on when you shut down the bike.

Heres a link step by step on what to do:http://www.offroadexplorer.com/Forum/viewtopic.php?f=58&t=1856&start=0

hope all works out.

2011DR650

Nova Scotia, Canada

actually u need to have the _____ in the center of the inspection hole not the T

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what do you mean " the _____ "

the line underneath the T. not sure why the designers felt the need to include an additional symbol (T) to confuse people when a line would suffice:bonk:

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I see the line in the hole in the picture RideoutJames posted. My bike was a causality of the NSU failure. Could my crank be a replacement without a T. The only mark I could find was a deep rectangle stamped on the crank.

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I see the line in the hole in the picture RideoutJames posted. My bike was a causality of the NSU failure. Could my crank be a replacement without a T. The only mark I could find was a deep rectangle stamped on the crank.

The timing mark is on the outside of the rotor just in case we are not talking about the same thing. If we are then I guess Suzuki could have made a rotor without a timing mark but it would surely have been a mistake.

Although the T line is the only line on the rotor my best guess for needing the T next to the timing line is to ensure you are using the correct line in case the rotor were to get scratched somehow?

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If you don't want to drain the oil, lay the bike onto it's right side and undo the magneto cover bolts and line the crank up that way. There will be two times the rotor lines up with the mark on the crankcase, (or two times the piston will be at the top of it's stroke) only one of these times will the valves/rockers will be free of pressure. This is the TDC of the COMPRESSION stroke where all timings are taken from. The rotor itself has several notches that can be seen through the small inspection hole. The action of the magnets inside the rotor can make it difficult to see the thin engraved line, as you try to spin the motor slowly and smoothly....maybe that's why there is the letter T stamped, so you don't mistake the edge of one of the recesses on the outer edge of the rotor.

Cheers,

Chris.

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First remove the tank and hose off the debris that's going to fall into the open plug hole, including the spark plug recess. Then remove the rocker covers and the outside spark plug. Drop something long, soft and skinny into the plug hole (I use a straw), as vertical as possible (Push it toward the frame. You're trying to keep the straw from bending as the piston rises). Rotate the engine until the straw stops rising: TDC.

Now wiggle the rockers, if they're loose you're at TDC on the compression stroke (where you want to be). If they're tight, you're on TDC of the exhaust stroke. Both valves are at the overlap position on the cam and both are slightly open (all four rocker arms don't wiggle). Do this two or three times to make sure you're on compression TDC. As a second check: if the feeler gauge is tight on all four rockers (before you touch anything), you're probably on the wrong TDC; rotate the engine 360* (straw goes down and back up) and try again.

Since both valves are closed for almost one full revolution (BDC, compression, power, BDC) the straw is more than accurate enough. The exact position of the "T" doesn't matter.

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Here is my theory on setting valve lash on motorcycles. I used this method on cars and I recently used it to set valve lash on my TW200. I checked my method by setting the lash the way the manual outlines then by doing it my way and got the same results. So here it goes: Rotate the engine counter clockwise until you see the exhaust valves just start to open. Now set your intake valves. Once the intake is set rotate the engine until you see the intake start to open, continue rotating until the intake valves are almost closed. Now set your exhaust valves.

Disclaimer:

That is my theory and it may or may not work with a DR650 I never tried it on mine.

Here is the video I made for a TW200 they're pretty similar.

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pretty much, you can set your clearance any time the rocker arms are loose on the cam. if the cam lobes are pointed away from the rocker arms, you're good to go. i've known people to do them one at a time like jake said, i personally do them when the conventional way, piston at tdc on the compression stroke. you don't need a mark on your flywheel, just watch the rockers as you turn the engine over and it should be obvious when you're good.

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