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problem w/ grip, armpump/wrist fatigue on throttle hand

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Im having a weird problem i never had before. This indoor season in the winter i cant seem to get a comfy grip on my throttle that feel natural where i dont think about it. Also i am only getting arm pump in my throttle hand or wrist fatigue. I never had this issue before. I dont have any problem with my other hand. i been tryin gto figure it out. Only thing i can come up with is deathgrip in the whoops or too much over grip on the throttle side. Any thoghts?

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Don't laugh...this works

Kuryakan ISO Grips. Bigger grip = less strength needed to hold and manipulate the grip. Fatigue goes bye bye for a very long time.

Here's my DRZ with the ISO grips and bark busters

IMG_20120129_041440.jpg

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I have the same problem. Throttle side only. I have tried EVERYTHING. The only thing that helps is riding more. If I ride several time in a couple weeks it starts to go away. If I dont get to ride for a while it comes back.

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relaxed grip, make sure you are over gripping before you go wide open or your wrist will be at a wierd angle. Are you getting arm pump from holding on to the throttle or using the front break? Are you standinng enough?

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Don't laugh...this works

Kuryakan ISO Grips. Bigger grip = less strength needed to hold and manipulate the grip. Fatigue goes bye bye for a very long time.

Here's my DRZ with the ISO grips and bark busters

How much are those and where can I get them? My fingers are really long and wrap all the way around my grips and hit the back part of my palm causing me to use lots of force to hold on. Pro Taper Pillow Tops helped but I still get arm pump something fierce. If they're not very expensive I might try them. They would look really weird on an mx bike though. Oh well. Function>form.

Edited by Ih8Hondas

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I've been through a lot of grips, I actually prefer the scott type 2 grips which are the thickest and softest they make. They are far better then the pro taper's, though they don't last long because they're so soft. The problem with the pro tapers is they don't conform to your hand very well, so even though they are considered "pillow top" they aren't nearly as soft as the scott soft's.

Arm pump is really related to gripping to hard on the bars and not being hydrated enough or not having decent water absorption through dietary issues. I have done a lot of experimenting with arm pump, trying different ways to get rid of it and discovering why it happens. If you stay hydrated at least 24 hours before riding and stay in the shade when not on the track, so you don't constantly use up the water in your body, you will recover much quicker from arm pump. Obviously it would be great to just relax on the bars, but its not something you can just do overnight. It took me a long time to ride relaxed and I don't get serious arm pump at all anymore, unless I'm dehydrated and haven't eaten well.

Anyway, there are tuns of threads about arm pump, just use the search function for this particular section of the forum and you'll read a great deal about it! :smirk:

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How much are those and where can I get them?
Pretty much any motorcycle shop. Measure your bars to make sure on the size. They are available in 7/8 ans 1". Pretty easy install if you take your time. Do not install the grip's end caps. The center hole may or may not need to be drilled slightly larger depending on your bark buster hardware.

BTW - these are on my DRZ400sm in the pic

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I had Tag T2 bars and tripple clamp, (no rubber mounts) my throttle hand would go numb and get to the point I couldn't pull in the front brake break after about 10 minutes of hard riding every time I rode. I'd still have enregy and want to keep riding but my hand was useless. This was in the summer when I was riding alot. Anyways I bent those bars and got the Easton exp 1 3/8 bars and clamps. Now I can ride till I'm completely exhausted and my hands are fine. There definately more flexible bars, If I stand on the bike and push down I can see them flex quite a bit. I've only been riding once a month indoors cause its winter here so I'm not in great riding shape. I also rode outside in january when the track was rough and frozen and again hands were fine. I was sceptical that these bars would help that much but I love them now. Unfortinately I don't think you'll be able to get them much longer, I think they might be discontuing them so you also wouldn't be able to get parts or replace them. I also should point out I was using the same grips.

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Practice regripping when your breaking/accelerating.

Proper handlebar bend and lever setup is important too... If your front break lever is too high or too low it will put additional strain on your hand/forearm.

Regrip and handlebar/lever setup should help!

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I too went through heaps of grips, I thought the fatter the better more rubber to cushion etc etc, well wrong !! you want the thinnest grips possible !! so you can relax your hands by not death gripping which is harder to do with thick grips !! This advice was given to me from an expert rider and it works !! I run the ODI grips no waffle and they are awesome !!

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This advice was given to me from an expert rider and it works !!
and that's why allinfo is subjective. I am an expert rider, street, not dirt.

The smaller the grip, the more grip strength is required to hold on. The larger the grip, the less grip strength is required to hold on (to a point).

Cheap option to test a bigger grip, get a set of the foam grip puppies and put them on top of your existing grips. This will give you a bigger grip. Ride it for a bit and see how it feels. If it is a good solution, rock on. If you still want to go with a bigger grip, then look at getting the kury iso grips or something similar.

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The smaller the grip, the more grip strength is required to hold on. The larger the grip, the less grip strength is required to hold on (to a point).

I'm curious what the reasoning behind this is? i've heard a few people say it and it never made sense to me. I can understand rider preference, but why would it by easier to hold on to? I've tried quite a few different grips and never noticed any of them taking more energy or giving me arm pump.

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Do you ride a street bike?

Many riders complain of the throttle hand going numb or loosing sensation because they are holding on so tightly they are cutting off circulation. A bigger grip is easier to hold onto.

Think of a 2-liter of coke with a very tight cap. Try to unscrew it. Then think of a normal jar of jelly or jam with a tight lid and try to unscrew it.

Basic physics tyells us the larger lid is easier to manipulate.

Another view - we run bigger tires to get more contact patch, which gives more traction, which allows more power to be used. The bigger grip is the same concept. Due to an increase in radius, thus an increase in friction between you rhand and the grip, LESS force is required to maintain a hold on said grip.

Hope that helps, if not... go to your local motorcycle dealer and compare a dirt grip to a street grip (better to compare if the grips are actually on a bike!)

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I'm curious what the reasoning behind this is? i've heard a few people say it and it never made sense to me. I can understand rider preference, but why would it by easier to hold on to? I've tried quite a few different grips and never noticed any of them taking more energy or giving me arm pump.

It is true, because you have to "clamp" further on your hand with the smaller diameter grips, you use those clamping muscles in a different way then a wider grip. Its very similar to when you use a mouse on your computer all day long and the bigger the mouse, the less effort it is to use, the less strain on those muscles.

You are also young and when you get older, the hands get more and more difficult to deal with. I'm almost 34 and have all sorts of hand issues, its really hard for me to grip the bars, which is why I rarely get arm pump. The thicker grips allow me to ride more loose because I don't have to grip in the zone where my hands start hurting. I've ridden bikes with thin grips before including my own and I just can't hold on, my hands just can't conform to that thinner diameter. Which is funny because in 2009 when I was roadracing, I used the thinnest grips you could buy and never had a problem... goes to show how the body gets old real quick! Damn motocross!! lol :smirk:

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Something else to mention -- aside from the grip itself... the bigger the lever, the less force require to move mass. The bigger grip gives a machanical advantage so it's actually EASIER (or takes less effort) to twist the throttle to begin with.

So, bigger grip = less force need to twist throttle AND easier on the hand to grip the grip.

Riders with small hands may not see a positive, but a negative result though!

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the bigger lid on the jar allows for more leverage i think. I'm a big guy, i have big hands, never have had a problem turning the throttle or with my hands getting tired from throttle, the clutch is a different story. I'm also particular about how much resistance my throttle has, and clean it regularly as well as service the cable. Is it kind of a surface area X force deal where the larger grip allows for a larger grip area which means forces are distributed over a larger area on your hand/fingers and require less hand strength via more muscles using less grip. If that makes sense? Edit: need to read all your posts... peoples arm/hand's get tired just turning the throttle?

larger grip = less pressure?

Edited by Die_trying

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peoples arm/hand's get tired just turning the throttle?

I think because you need to use the right hand more then the left, it wears some people out more. Mind you, most people who ride 4 strokes, don't use the clutch very much, so their left hand has little to do but hold onto the bars.

I've had days after a crash or a week of using a computer mouse non-stop, where my right wrist and fingers just stop working. They literally lockup and you can't move them.

larger grip = less pressure?

Larger grip = less stress, which can be translated into a greater leverage feeling. Its ALL personal preference in the long run. Though I do feel there is a limit to how large the grips can be where the negatives outweigh the benefits.

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I too went through heaps of grips, I thought the fatter the better more rubber to cushion etc etc, well wrong !! you want the thinnest grips possible !! so you can relax your hands by not death gripping which is harder to do with thick grips !! This advice was given to me from an expert rider and it works !! I run the ODI grips no waffle and they are awesome !!

Same here. I use Scott grips they are knarly and thin. I have small hands and I cant use big fat grips. Arm pump is due to lactic acid buildup from riding too stiff and not breathing properly. I can always ride through arm pump if I get it during practice. The remedy is riding looser and using your lower body to steer the bike. Nutrition and hydration affects me more in the calves of my legs than the arms. If I hydrate properly and eat properly, I wont get any cramps except for arm pump if I haven't rode in a while or start the first session to tight on the bike.

Edited by dogfish

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