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honda axle bolt?

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I got a crf 450 r (2009) Honda axle bolt and when I thread it by hand it doesn't want to go on all the way. At first, it fits perfect, but it gets about 3/4 of the way onto the axle and comes to a dead stop before getting to the end. Once that happened, I didn't want to attempt to crank it on, so I stopped to make sure I had the right bolt. honda part number is 90305-kz4-j20. when i compared it to the castle nut, it doesn't look as deep.

does anyone know if I have the right bolt??

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The Honda bolt is a nylock, you are hitting the part of the bolt with the nylon in it that locks it in place. It's normal, and it's the reason you don't have to use a cotter pin with it.

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I took my stock nut from my Honda and threw it as far as i could. That locking mechanicsm has a habbit of seizing on the threads and stripping the nut out. I went and bought a KX450 rear nut and threaded it on to my stock axle. I just drilled a hole in the axle and istalled a cotter pin. In my opinion the Kawasaki nut is a much more reliable design.

I would put some anti seize on there before you put the nut on in order to prevent it from gawling your threads.

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....and it's a nut, not a bolt.

Lol. Right. Nut, not bolt.

The nyloc is nice but the cotter pin really only takes another 30 seconds to deal with so it's really not that big of a deal. Plus you are only supposed to use a nyloc so many times before it is supposed to be replaced. At least that's how it is in aviation. Actually in aviation I think your only supposed to use it once...

Edited by shang

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On a dirtbike a nyloc nut is fine to re-use as long as resistance is felt when the thread reaches the nylon plastic. Ny-loc = nylon lock.

A Fuji locking nut does the same thing, but the last thread in the nut is of a different pitch to make it grab on to the thread and not back out.

A castle nut uses a cotter pin through it´s slots, through a hole in the axle/bolt.

Another common type of nut is the toplock nut that has deformed threads at the end to achieve the same thing.

A castle nut, or a nyloc, are basically the only ones that does not wear the thread out and causes seized bolts with repeated use.

Edited by D-K

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okay, thanks for the info, just wanted to make sure before i crank it on. and yes, my BOLT is definitely a NUT, haha.

I really don't care about dealing with the cotter pin, but I went to buy some (at a Kawasawki Dealer) and they wanted $2.00 a piece!! The Honda nut was $7.00 so I figured I might as well just use it instead. Does anyone know where to get the cotter pins at a reasonable price? I'm sure I could get something comparable without buying the ones from Kawasawki, but my bike didn't come with one, so I don't have a reference.

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Honestly, if you use a torque wrench and are 100% certain that you reach 110 Nm of torque, you don´t need the cotter pin at all.

In all my years of riding, I have never found the nut wanting to back off and be resting on the cotter pin. If the nut is tight, it won´t come off.

And if it´s price, or convenience, you can put just about anything in the hole. A zip-tie, a nail, anything to be on the safe side.

The cotter pin is most likely a lawyer suggested part, since many other bikes have no locking feature on the rear axle nut (KTM).

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Yeah, I'm not gonna lose any sleep over it. Thanks for the info!

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you can buy the cotter pin at your local hardware store for 10 cents. I bought an assortment a long time ago for something like 20 dollars and It has all diffrent sizes for what ever I am working on.

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