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KTM 450-530 Oil Pump Upgrade. How-To with Pics.

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I recently read that KTM upgraded the oil pump gears and oil pump cover O-ring on the 2011 450 & 530 EXC/XC-W models and that some people have experienced oil pump/engine failures with the 2008-2010 parts. I figured it would be cheap insurance to order the updated parts and get them installed asap. Plus it would give me an opportunity to see exactly what they changed on the gears and by how much.

My 09 (2010 Vin) Champion model 530exc currently has 135.3hrs on it.

UPDATE: KTM has recently updated the oil pump shaft with a superseded part number so I updated this how-to (12-23-11) to include the shaft replacement. Also if you have a 08 model you will want to update your oil jet to the 09 and later larger jet for proper oiling. The 08's came with a 100 oil jet, the 09's and up came with a 125.

I recently sold my 09 and purchased a 2010 SixDays, I thought I would open it up to verify it had the updated oil pump gears/O-ring installed from the factory. My 2010 was built on 10/09 and I found it had the updated oil pump gears but not the updated oil pump O-ring or shaft. I installed the updated parts while it was open and took pictures of the shaft installation to add to the how-to below. If you have a 2010 you might want to add the Oil pump O-ring for piece of mind.

Models Effected: 450/530 EXC & XC-W's.

Updates needed by year

2008: Oil pump gears, oil pump cover, oil pump cover o-ring, oil pump shaft, oil jet

2009: Oil pump gears, oil pump cover, oil pump cover o-ring, oil pump shaft

2010: (Actual 2010, not the champions edition with a 2010 Vin that's actually a 2009): oil pump cover, oil pump cover o-ring, oil pump shaft

2011: Updates are done at the factory...your good to go!

Tools that you will need on hand:

*Torque wrench in In/lbs (for the smaller bolts) and ft/lbs

*Clutch basket Holder Tool - Like this one: CLICK HERE NOTE: This tool works but not correctly on our baskets. You have to use the tool on the inside of the basket to make it work.

*Misc hand tools. Wrenches, Sockets, Breaker bar.

*Impact Gun is nice to remove the Clutch Basket Nut but not a necessity, you can use the Clutch Basket Tool and a Breaker Bar as well.

Supplies to have on hand (11 530EXC Referenced on Part#'s):

*CLUTCH COVER GASKET: KTM Part# 78030025000

*RETAINING PLATE: KTM Part# 77332018000 (Lock Tab For Clutch Basket Nut) Note: It can be re-used but it's cheap to replace and you don't have to worry about it.

*HEXAGON NUT DIN0936-M18X1.5 R.: KTM Part# 0936181505 (Clutch Basket Nut..manual says to replace, a lot of people re-use the old one)

*OIL PUMP COVER CPL.: KTM Part# 78038103233

*OIL PUMP COVER O-RING 32x1.50 VITON: KTM Part# 0770320015

*OIL PUMP GEAR 17T: KTM Part# 78038001017

*OIL PUMP GEAR 27T: KTM Part# 78038001027

*TAB WASHER (2 Needed): KTM Part# 0799060000

*Oil Pump Shaft: KTM Part# 78038102100

*Oil Pump (Suction) O-ring:KTM Part# 0770440020

*2008 Only - Oil Pump Jet 125: KTM Part# 57031523125

*Your favorite oil to re-fill the transmission with

*Your favorite coolant to re-fill the cooling system

*Shop Manual. Nice to verify you have everything in the right spot and order upon re-assembly. If you don't have a manual you can use the parts diagrams as reference...example KTM Cycle Hutt Parts FicheFinder: CLICK HERE

Handy Torque Values:

"Screw, Torque Limiter" - M6, 7.38 ft/lbs Loctite 243

"Nut, Inner Clutch Hub" - M18x1.5, 59.01 ft/lbs

"Screw, Clutch Spring" - M6, 7.38 ft/lbs

"Screw, Clutch Cover" - M6x25, 7.38 ft/lbs

"Screw, Clutch Cover" - M6x30, 7.38 ft/lbs

"Screw, Kickstarter" - M8, 18.44 ft/lbs Loctite 243

"Screw, Oil Pump Cover" - M5. 4.43ft/lbs Loctite 222

Start by draining the transmission oil.

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Drain the engine coolant.

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Then remove the kick start lever, rear brake pedal, loosen the clamp on the water pump hose and slide back the hose and remove the bolts holding the clutch cover on.

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I have a habit of laying the bolts out on a towel in the orientation that I removed them so I don't have to figure out which length bolts go where when you start re-assembly.

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Slide off the clutch cover and set it to the side. Now remove the 4 clutch spring bolts, slide the clutch pack out and set it to the side. I like to grab the whole pack and slide it out as a unit, make sure you keep track of their order as all the parts come out.

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Flatten the security tabs on the clutch retainer and remove the nut holding on the clutch basket. An impact gun works best but you can use the clutch basket tool and a breaker bar as well.

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Here are the spacers that sit on the back of the clutch basket. These will remain on the basket when you slide the clutch packs off. Make sure you keep track of them and that they go back the same way during re-assembly.

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Parts removed

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Now that the clutch basket has been removed we can see the offending oil pump gears. Using a small screw driver remove the clips that hold the oil pump gears onto the pump shafts. Remove the washer and the gear from each pump. I'll be replacing the lower pump cover and O-ring as well.

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This forum only lets a limited number of photo's in each post..continued below...

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Continued from above.....

With the gears out of the bike we can now compare the old gears with the new updated units. The new gears are thicker where they ride on the pump shaft, this should keep the gears running true and take out some slop between the gear and the shaft. Not sure if there is any difference in the materials used between the old and new gears. Here are the small 17 tooth gears.

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You can notice a big difference in the large 27 tooth oil pump gear. This is the gear that gets driven off the clutch basket and transfers power to the small 17T oil pump gear. The loads on this gear are higher and it looks like they built up the surface area on the shaft considerably, as well as trapping the drive pin completely so it can't slip out.

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Bottom view of the 27T gears.

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Next I removed the lower oil pump cover and compared it with the new unit. This picture was taken when re-installing the new cover but shows where the cover is located.

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I measured the old and new O-rings to compare the difference. I've read that the original cover/O-ring can fail letting oil get pumped from the engine side to the transmission or from the transmission to the engine depending on what side of the pump the O-ring fails on. Again cheap insurance to eliminate a problem while out on the trail.

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Update, Installing the new oil pump shaft: With the oil pump cover already removed slide the oil pump shaft and inner rotor out towards you. (Red arrow is the pump shaft, Blue arrow is the inner rotor).

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Once slid out remove the pin and the rotor and set them aside on a clean cloth. (Blue arrow is the inner rotor, Red arrow is the pin). This is as far as the shaft will move in this direction, it will be removed from the opposite side of the engine.

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Next go around to the other side of the bike and remove the suction pump's cover, the cover is located right behind the stator and shift lever. Remove the three screws holding the cover on and set the cover/screws to the side.

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Continued Below.....

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Continued from above.....

Once the cover is removed slide out the inner rotor and pin (Red arrow), set them to the side.

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Remove the shaft from the engine.

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Here's a photo of the old oil pump shaft and the superseded shaft. The new shaft is slightly longer, other than that I couldn't see any differences. Not sure if anything else has been changed, heat treating etc? The shaft is only $11 so it's worth it for me to have the updated part.

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Install the new oil pump shaft in through the suction pump side. Oil the shaft before installing.

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Once you have the shaft installed you need to start the re-assembly on the clutch side of the engine. (Do not install the suction rotor/cover at this time or you will have to remove it again).

Slide the shaft out on the clutch side and install the pin (Red arrow) and inner oil pump rotor (Blue arrow). Oil everything before installation. (If you had installed the suction side first it would have become disconnected once you pull the shaft to the clutch side to install the pin, forcing you to open it back up again to re-connect). Once the pin is installed push the shaft and inner rotor back towards the suction pump and align the inner rotor onto the pin. The inner and outer oil pump rotor's should be flush now.

*Note: You shouldn't have removed the outer pump rotor but if for some reason you had it out you need to make sure it's re-installed in the correct direction. The outer rotor has the mark (dimple) facing inward, the inner rotor (the one you removed with the shaft) has the dimple facing outwards.

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Blue arrow shows the dimple facing outward on the inner rotor, Red arrow showing no dimple on the outer rotor since the dimple is facing inward.

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Install the oil pump cover (red arrow) with updated oil pump cover O-ring and torque screws to proper torque.

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Go back to the suction pump and install the inner rotor and pin back onto the oil pump shaft. Oil everything before installation.

*Note: You shouldn't have removed the outer pump rotor but if for some reason you had it out you need to make sure it's re-installed in the correct direction. The outer rotor has the mark (dimple) facing inward, the inner rotor (the one you removed with the shaft) has the dimple facing outwards.

Install a new Suction pump cover O-ring at this time. (Red arrow new O-ring, Blue arrow is the dimple facing out on the inner rotor...note you can not see the dimple on the outer rotor since it's facing inward).

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Re-Install the suction pump cover and torque the screws to the proper torque. (I decided to add a little bling from the hard parts catalog while I was at it :evil). New cover installed.

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New oil pump gears installed in the bike. The gears are noticeably tighter on the shafts than the old gears. I also ordered new retaining clips (KTM calls them tab washers) for each gear and the new clips were noticeably tighter on the shaft than the old clips (same clips as the old ones, just new and tight).

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Continued Below....

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Continued from above...

2008 Models Only. If you have a 2008 model replace the 100 Oil Jet with the updated 125 Oil Jet for proper oiling. Arrow showing location of oil jet under clutch cover.

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I've been asked a couple times about how the clutch basket tool works when torquing up the inner clutch hub nut. Some people use a impact gun and just rattle down the nut....I prefer to torque the nut to proper specs using a torque wrench.

I purchased a TUSK brand clutch basket tool from RockyMountainATV but it doesn't fit the KTM properly. The tool can still work but you have to install it on the inside of the inner basket instead of on the outside like it should work. The red arrows show where to place the TUSK brand tool.

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Use the foot peg to back up the tool (red arrow) while you torque the nut down with the torque wrench.

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Now just re-assemble everything, torque up the bolts/nuts, refill the oil and coolant and hit the trails with piece of mind about your oil pump gears :smirk:

Hodakaguy

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I just wanted to give my thanks and a big thumbs up for Hodakaguy's excellent instructions for this upgrade! I wouldn't have attempted it without this post and his instructions were critical when the oil pumps both came out of the bike during disassembly and I wasn't sure how they went back in.

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A really big "THANK YOU!!" to Hodakaguy for taking the time to document this fix. My buddy and I performed this surgery on our '08 EXC 450's this weekend with steller results.

Thanks again!

Scott

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thank-you for the great how too.

I have a 2010 530 and just did the pump seal and plastic gears.

by the way the outside pump shaft seal was installed backwards from the factory. :cry:

cheers jim

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So will this also solve the oil transfer problem? I think my 09 is transferring oil from transmission to engine.

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So will this also solve the oil transfer problem? I think my 09 is transferring oil from transmission to engine.

It might, some of the transfer issues are caused by the pump cover O-ring and some the crank seals. I would try the oil pump upgrade/o-ring upgrade first and see it that does the trick,

Hodakaguy

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Thanks very much for this tutorial!

My 2010 530exc engine recently blew at only 102 hrs, and I noticed performance loss at about 90 hrs, but at the time didn't know what was causing it, and certainly didn't expect it to be a worn out bore! It was also blowing coolant out of the overflow long before that, and I thought it was just overheating, but the coolant system must have been getting pressurised by a leak somewhere.

My bike's at the mechanic's right now, getting a brand new cylinder and head(aswell as a new con-rod etc), because the old ones were destroyed when the engine overheated and blew. It got so hot that we couldn't even get the plug out (part of the cylinder and head had actually melted), when trying to find out what was wrong, while stranded on a beach, 20kms away from our destination.

After seeing that the cylinder lining had worn through, my mechanic said that it looked like a lack of lubrication. It made me look bad, but I was pretty sure that I'd always done my oil changes in time and properly! I was even questioning the oil I'd been using, Shell ultra, which is fully synthetic, and I had decided not to ever use it again until I saw this thread.

I really hope that this was the cause of the failure. The only other thing I can think of that maybe could have been an issue, was that I used the sight glass to measure the oil level, and didn't always fit the full 600ml in, thinking that maybe there was some old oil still in there, and not wanting to cause pressure issues on seals, which caused problems on earlier KTM's. I only changed the filter every other oil change, so there was obviously still some oil in there then. Otherwise I don't know what it could have been, at relatively low hours for a big bike.

I'll call my mechanic tomorrow to see if he knows about these oil pump upgrades, and see if he can get them and install them!

Excellent tutorial too!!! Great pics and great info on part no.'s, and differences between old and new parts!

Cheers!!!!!

Edited by ben_suhard

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An update to my saga.

My bike already had the updated oil pump parts.

My mechanic now thinks it might have been over-heating due to running lean. I fitted an FMF powercore 4 muffler at 82HRS, but didn't adjust the fuel screw, so that might be to blame. He reckons it could have got hot, warped the head, and blew the gasket. I'm wondering if maybe it was even running lean with the stock muffler too. I trusted that the dealer had set it up right, but I probably should have checked the fuel screw adjustment straight away. I didn't ask if he just played with the fuel screw, or with the needle and jets too, though; I'll have to ask.

He also said that the valve shim size he's fitted are way different to what had been in there from new, and wonders if that maybe caused the problem. We'll most likely never know.

Anyway, she's going now, so, it's time to ride! I'm not expecting it to happen again, and I'll get my valves checked more often! A lesson learned.

Edited by ben_suhard
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If your 2010 is anything like mine, it won't take long for the engine oil to get low from simply being burned. Mine never smoked, but after a 4-5 hour ride, 100-150 ml would be gone. A piston with a proper 3 piece oil ring solved this issue completely.

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great write up... what are some signs i need this done for my 08 530? all seems fine to me.

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Great job! How much did the parts run you? I have a 2008 450EXCr, 1400 miles and have not had an issue yet. Starting to get nervous after reading this. May be good insurance!

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Great write up Hodakaguy!

I have a new to me 09 450exc that was owned by a buddy of mine. The bike has less than 1000 miles on it and has been bullet proof. But I want to do this fix , before I do the DJH fix. His is way more expensive as you know. The part numbers that you put down, I am assuming that just because it comes up for 08 450exc`s they are still the new upgraded parts. Thanks again, Marc

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I just followed these excellent instructions on my 2008 450 excr. Thanks so much HodakaGuy. I purchased my bike new and it had 7,400 trail miles on it when I did the work. Total parts were $123.00 including new water pump seals and impeller, water pump and side case gaskets (no bling orange oil pump cover).

The reason for me doing this upgrade was during the water pump seal removal I was able to wiggle the large oil pump gear on the shaft and It seemed worn. The new large oil pump gear on the new oil shaft wobbles around just as much as the old setup and the small oil pump fits nice and tight just like the old one.

Just an observation, I am glad it is taken care of though.

Thanks again.

I used all of the hodakaguy part numbers without issue.

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Thanks Hodaka, for taking the time to put this tutorial together. I was looking online at KTM worlds parts fiche & it showed the gears in my 09 530 had been updated. I ordered the gears anyway. Well, I'm glad I did. It had the weaker gears in it when I cracked it open(must have been built in 08). I also inspected the two shafts side by side. The differance was in the shaft dimension from the gear end, to the bottom of the cutout at the other end. New shaft had a greater dimension, meaning the slot wasn't machined as deep as the old one. This took out all of the end play between the two eaton pump gear pins. In my opinion, this is a must do update. It really wasn't that bad of a job, & the parts are inexpensive. Great insurance! You Sir get an A+ for your work!!!!!!

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I want to say thanks to Hodaka Guy for this great step by step right up. I ordered the parts for my bike from KTMPARTSHOUSE for a huge savings over everyone else. My buddy and I did it from start to finish in two hours. We both do all the maintenance on our bikes and have for years. But this was the deepest we have ever been into a 4T. Thanks again

Marc

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I'd like to say thanks to hodaka guy for this awesome step by step upgrade, I just ordered the parts yesterday from a local ktm shop here in cobourg, Ontario called orange motorsports, great guys and hopefully in a few days I can finally get the parts and get my hands dirty. Thanks again

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