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Removing Peening/ Threads help

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I decided to order a DYI kit from SPI, and figured its my first re-valve, so wanted to start early and take my time so I get it all done with no rush. Today I started to remove all the valving, so got a file and went to work for about 5 mins., checking every now and then. So once the threads were flush with the nut, I cracked it loose and it got about a half a turn then started to get hard to turn, so put it back on and filed a bit more, got a little past half then got hard, so my inpatience said just do it, so I did, everything came off good, some pieces got stuck on some edges, but put the piece back down and filed the edge a bit and came off fine, but when I went to see if the nut would go on smoothly, only went on half a turn :smirk: so I tried my best to get all edges off and seems I did, but the nut wont go on any farther than half a turn!! So I was thinking maybe buy a threader and just run it over the stem and through the nut? But what size is the threads, couldn't find it in my manual. Or is there something else I can do?

Edited by PitBikeNoob

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Do you have a dremel tool? I would use that to remove the peening for future reference. It is what I used recently for a set of forks and it worked like a champ (using a cone shaped burr).

As for the issue you are having, I would have put the nut back on all the way after removing the shims and all .to use as a "thread cleaner" after you clean up theads and/or chamfer/bevel the end using a wire brush, grinding wheel, etc. or whatever you want to use. That way when you back the nut off it "cleans" the threads as you loosen it up. If you leave the nut off, sometimes you run into issues of not being able to tighten the nut back onto the stem.

So at this point, your best bet is to probably chase the threads with a thread chaser/die/tap.

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I decided to order a DYI kit from SPI, and figured its my first re-valve, so wanted to start early and take my time so I get it all done with no rush. Today I started to remove all the valving, so got a file and went to work for about 5 mins., checking every now and then. So once the threads were flush with the nut, I cracked it loose and it got about a half a turn then started to get hard to turn, so put it back on and filed a bit more, got a little past half then got hard, so my inpatience said just do it, so I did, everything came off good, some pieces got stuck on some edges, but put the piece back down and filed the edge a bit and came off fine, but when I went to see if the nut would go on smoothly, only went on half a turn :smirk: so I tried my best to get all edges off and seems I did, but the nut wont go on any farther than half a turn!! So I was thinking maybe buy a threader and just run it over the stem and through the nut? But what size is the threads, couldn't find it in my manual. Or is there something else I can do?

You will get the nuts with the kit, and yes always chase the threads with a die. 6mm x 1.0 thread pitch.

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Alright. And what about the middel of the stem? It was a circle/triangle but when I ground it down it covered most of it up. Should I leave it or drill it out?

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Don't drill it. The triangular indentation in the tip of the stem was how it was "staked" to expand the end of it as a means of retaining the nut. Don't be concerned by its absence. Always try to minimize the amount of material you remove so that there is as much remaining thread as possible. Be sure you start the die you use to chase the thread "straight" so that it doesn't cross or double thread the stem.

When reassembling, be sure the nut is new (Dave usually sends new lock nuts in the kits), the threads on the nut and stem are clean, prepped with brake or electric contact cleaner, and dry, then apply red Loc-Tite and torque to the specifications given.

In the worst case, either stem in the fork can be replaced separately, and SPI can sell them to you at a reasonable price, but it's a delay, an expense, and some work that you don't really need or want.

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They are the bleed path and are very important

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What I said was...

The triangular indentation in the tip of the stem was how it was "staked" to expand the end of it as a means of retaining the nut. Don't be concerned by its absence.

There should be no reason for the bleed hole to have been closed by dressing off the peening/staking. If for some reason the end of the hole needs clearing, then I'd recommend using a pointed scraper tool to remove the burr or whatever, rather than a drill. At the other end of that passage is a needle, seat and spring that you don't want the drill anywhere near.

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use a thread file to clean up the threads on the shafts. then use new nuts. thread files work much better than dies. the thread files come with eigth different pitches/sizes on them.

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I just filed the tip down to have a slight angle, and not its only tight for an 8th of a turn, the rest it just goes down smooth. And the hole were not completely clogged, just the burring folded over into it, cleaned it out wait a small round file. And is there a way to take of the stem and internals on the dampening rod? It seems like some dust might have gone down and really don't want to mess that up.

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Now for assembly, I don't have a inch-pound wrench, so is there a way to figure out when everything is there by hand?

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Now for assembly, I don't have a inch-pound wrench, so is there a way to figure out when everything is there by hand?

just snug it up you'll be fine. use blue locktite if you have it.

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Remember that you are working with an aluminum thread and stem. Be careful.

If you have a pull spring scale like a fisherman's scale for weighing hanging objects, you can "mickey" a torque wrench out of that and an ordinary combination wrench. 40 inch pounds is 3.3 ft/lb, so if you have a 6" long combo wrench, you can apply 6.6 lbs of pull on it and be about right.

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Even with a snap on torque wrench they can strip, i go on feel on them every time

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Even with a snap on torque wrench they can strip, i go on feel on them every time

Well,yes, the brain is the most important tool you can use, and there's nothing like the feedback an experienced mechanic gets from a well developed "feel" for the assembly. The only downside of that is what we all went through while our advanced sense of feel was developing. :smirk:

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Still mess up bolts now and then, always one will catch you out ;-)

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