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Trail vs Track Riding

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I am new to riding and I am sure this is a simple topic that has probably been covered before but I will ask anyway. I see a lot of bikes listed as "trail riden only or never raced." I know they are probably not all true but what is the difference? Why is track and racing so much harder on a bike and components? I have seen some really good track bikes and some messed up looking trail bikes that you can tell they have been ridden hard. I have never raced but you are still doing all the same things (shifting, accelerating, decelerating braking ect) on trail to avoid obstacles as you are on a track. For example I ride a 450R primarily on tracks but not hard at all, hardly ever even get out of 3-4 gear and no jumping. Thanks for the comments, trying to learn as much as possible.

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To some point I would rather buy a raced bike. If someone was serious about racing, they would take the necessary steps to keep the bike in working order. On the other hand, there are people that trail ride bikes that never do anything but change their oil and put gas in it. They end up neglecting all the suspension bearings, seals, chassis bearings and all the other stuff that someone who races greases at regular intervals. Then there are other people that trail ride and do all the necessary things (like me). I don't ride as often as I used to, but at the very least, my bikes get stripped down to the frame and every bearing gets greased or replaced if they are starting to look like they have had better days. Just have to have a keen eye if you are looking to buy a bike.

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I agree with whats said above. I look for bikes that were raced when looking for a bike. Because you can tell if it was the type of person that replaced anything as soon as it was even 10% worn. Were as many casual trail riders will just ride a bike to the ground, only replacing things when they stop working. Where as a racer cant afford to let things get to the point it could fail during a race.

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Interesting spin. I was under the impression the type riding was harder on the bike. I don't think i have ever seen a listing where the user pointed out it was a race bike. They always say "never raced, trial or field ridden" or at the most "raced once or twice." They make it sound like it is a selling feature to be trail ridden. I try to keep up with all the maintenance but when you have 4 bikes to maintain it is difficult. The kids are too young to really help but they want the bikes ready to ride when they get home from school.

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I dont believe in that "trail ridden only " BS .. we trail ride our bikes and they see alot of abuse too , go by what you see , look at the engine(outside) , levers , sprockets, etc etc .. I wish i could see inside an engine when looking for a used bike :/

Edited by jruba

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I would ignore anthing someone puts about their maintenance and just look at the bike yourself. I always make sure I have about 1500 extra to spend on whatever bike I buy used. Ask the seller for receipts on their parts or if they keep a shop journal-or note their maintanence. I write everything I do to my bike down, so that when I sell it the buyer can see that I took care of it. The trail ridden only thing is not a good indication of anything....my bike has probably seen its worst crashes "trail riding" - cartwheels, ravines, 5th gear crashes that have you looking for your muffler etc...and all trail riding lol.

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What Chris said is pretty much spot on ^^^^^^^ IMO, raced bikes are a little riskier, but it all depends on the person who was racing...

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