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Thrust load direction on mainshaft 2000 kx 250

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Anybody know what direction the thrust load is on the transmission mainshaft on my 2000 kx 250? I am installing the circlips and the book says they are directional but it does not specify which direction. :smirk:

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I have put together quite a few transmissions and just put the circlips on and never thought about it and have NEVER had a problem with them. Also I just looked in my 99 service manual and see nothing about the direction of the thrust so maybe I am not understanding the question.

Ed

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Thaks for the reply,

The instructions for the mainshaft assembly say "Install the circlips with their chamfered edge facing away from the thrust load." Hope that helps.

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My manual doesn't say anything about that but I now think I see what you are saying and I would guess the thrust would come from the shift fork pushing the gear over to make the shift and in that case I would put the sharp edge towards the sliding gear sence that must be thre thrust they are talking about. I have never bothered to worry about that but that does not mean I am doing it correctly. I think you will be fine with which everway yo do it.

Ed

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Thaks for the reply,

The instructions for the mainshaft assembly say "Install the circlips with their chamfered edge facing away from the thrust load." Hope that helps.

always always always do this. its a general rule of thumb for circlips/snaprings for any assembly . they are stamped from sheet metal in the manufacturing process, which leaves a rounded edge on the top side and a nice sharp 90 on the bottom. the rounded edge can act like a wedge to work a clip out of its groove. the primary thrust load on that shaft comes from the clutch assembly when it is in the disengaged state; which would be left to right. so all the chamfered edges should face the right as viewed from sitting on the bike.

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That is a very good point on the clutch causing a thrust load. I like Sean's suggestion and will do it that way myself in the future.

Ed

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always always always do this. its a general rule of thumb for circlips/snaprings for any assembly . they are stamped from sheet metal in the manufacturing process, which leaves a rounded edge on the top side and a nice sharp 90 on the bottom. the rounded edge can act like a wedge to work a clip out of its groove. the primary thrust load on that shaft comes from the clutch assembly when it is in the disengaged state; which would be left to right. so all the chamfered edges should face the right as viewed from sitting on the bike.

While I'm thinking about it, what is the direction of the thrust load on the other transmission shaft?

Edited by heffsquatrulez

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While I'm thinking about it, what is the direction of the thrust load on the other transmission shaft?

since they are straight cut gears, there are no thrust loads on the output shaft, unless you consider the shift fork action a thrust load, but those go in each direction and are negligible.

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