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FE 570 S Steering Behavior

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Gents:

First - thank you for all of the responses to my other post on being a new Berg owner. I am hoping to pick it up this week so I can look at it in the garage while I heal from my hernia surgery coming this Friday.

Anyway, I am not posting foir sympathy, I need you to continue to help me spend my money! If this bike turns out to "be the one", I will be selling my "original owner" babied '04 525 EXC and the only item I am considering robbing off of it is the Scott damper, currently sitting atop the bars as oppossed to the under the bar mounting option.

I am a responsible 51 year old rider (been riding since 9) and I do single track technical/hill riding, some fast trail riding when the trail opens up and I am not sure I am a good candidate for a damper. I know this, I don't really understand how a steering damper on a single front wheel vehicle provides value? I can certianly see it on an ATV where one wheel hitting an obstruction causes the bars to want to turn from the off-center force being applied to a single side of the steering geometry, but that doesn't occur on a single wheel, does it? There have been a few times where I "think" the damper kept me from over steering whereby I didn't go down, but I am not sure.

Here's my question(s): would my type of riding or would the Berg benefit from the Scotts damper or is it really something that truly only benefits a racer?

Best,

Kirk

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Well, I went ahead and put a Scotts stabilizer with their under the bar mount on my Berg.

The under bar mount helped me fit the bike better when standing.

I had not previously run with a stabilizer, but I do feel more comfortable on the bike with it installed.

I run more tight single track and mountain trails as well as a bit of faster trail, desert and street.

I don't know how to explain the dynamics and forces at work, but I think at the end of the day you will like having the stabilizer on your new Berg.

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Gents:

First - thank you for all of the responses to my other post on being a new Berg owner. I am hoping to pick it up this week so I can look at it in the garage while I heal from my hernia surgery coming this Friday.

Anyway, I am not posting foir sympathy, I need you to continue to help me spend my money! If this bike turns out to "be the one", I will be selling my "original owner" babied '04 525 EXC and the only item I am considering robbing off of it is the Scott damper, currently sitting atop the bars as oppossed to the under the bar mounting option.

I am a responsible 51 year old rider (been riding since 9) and I do single track technical/hill riding, some fast trail riding when the trail opens up and I am not sure I am a good candidate for a damper. I know this, I don't really understand how a steering damper on a single front wheel vehicle provides value? I can certianly see it on an ATV where one wheel hitting an obstruction causes the bars to want to turn from the off-center force being applied to a single side of the steering geometry, but that doesn't occur on a single wheel, does it? There have been a few times where I "think" the damper kept me from over steering whereby I didn't go down, but I am not sure.

Here's my question(s): would my type of riding or would the Berg benefit from the Scotts damper or is it really something that truly only benefits a racer?

Best,

Kirk

One way to think of how the damper helps is to remember when we drove cars that had manual steering: You would hit a bump or pothole in the road and the steering wheel would jerk in your hands causing you to hold on tighter. Now that we have hydraulic power steering you hit a pothole and you dont really feel the steering wheel do anythiing. The damper works very similiar to this in that it causes less work for the rider to hold on to the bars. If you run a lot of single track, slow speed type riding you will normally run the damper "looser" on our slow speed setting and depend on the high speed setting to take the sudden quick impacts.

Thanks-

Eric

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Great info, glad this came up.

I have never had a dampener on any of my bikes. I never thought I needed one and since I've never had one, I had nothing to compare it to. A buddy of mine spent a chunk of dough on one and told me it was the best investment he made to his bike, then he found out he installed it wrong and it wasn't providing him with any dampenening at all. I think he was justifying the expense.

So I'm skeptical. I know racers and others swear by them and they can obviously feel a difference. But is it really worth all the extra $$$$. Your opinions please.

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I installed a Scotts damper on my Husaberg. First time I have used one. I think it helped me in two significant ways:

1) The bike is much easier to ride in soft sand and gravel - it just tracks better.

2) I am noticably less fatigued at the end of the day. The damper absorbs a lot of the trail impact, reducing what hits my arms.

I am a believer.

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I too was skeptical on putting one on my bike,i didnt think i rode fast enough to need one.It has saved my butt more than a few times from a high speed crash,for me 1 save and it paid for itself,this way i live to ride again.

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Maybe I don't ride agressively enough to warrant one, but I have yet to identify a $300 steering problem on my 570.

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Yes, the damper is a bit expensive, but it is a part you can keep from bike to bike. I got my FE450 and did a few rides without my Scotts on it as I had to order a mount kit (went with the SUB mount). So I was able to sample the bike before and after. Whatever your speed, the Scotts lets you relex. The 'Berg is a light steering bike and with the Scotts it really is a delight.

Just do it :bonk:

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