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ATC200s Hybrid

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I have a 84 ATC200s. Its a blast but i want some more power. One of my buddies has an old yz250 motor i want to put in it. Has anyone ever tried something like this? Looks like it would work because the 200s has a nice wide frame, but just wondering if it has been done. Also, and this might be the hard part, i want to take the rear end off a 400ex or something and use the axle and possibly the swingarm and suspension. Any thoughts or insight would be appreciated.

And i know i could just buy a 250r, but i dont have the funds, and i have the resources to do this. Thanks!!

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You'll deffinitly have a lot of fabrication to do between motor mounts and locating a place to mount the rad and with the power from the yz250 motor i really think you will have your hands full just trying to handle it on a 200s frame, id try to find a 250r frame just my thoughts 

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Yeah, I would start with a bigger frame. The rad would probably need to go above the front fender like an old tecate. That would save you a little room. An old air cooler would be better in a 200s frame. Cr 80 or 125

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You're trying to reinvent the wheel.

 

 

If you add more power, you'll have to add rear suspension. If you add rear suspension, you'll have to increase the front suspension travel. If it goes faster, you'll have to add better brakes, likely disc.

 

If you don't have the money to buy something else, don't screw up what you already have, just enjoy it for what it is.

 

One of the best things about the 200 is the light weight and simplicity. Adding rear suspension adds weight and complexity. A swinger also means chain sliders, which is just more parts to replace when they wear out. If you add more suspension, you also raise the ride height, which means a higher CG, which means it won't slide as easily, which is a huge part of trike handling. On gravel roads at top 200 speed, the thing can be slung around like nobody's business, with little concern about tipping over. I have routinely brought one up on two  wheels in top gear, around turns, because it's so stable with the hard-tail. When up on two wheels, there is no rear suspension to compress and risk uncompressing if going over too much.

 

I don't know the condition of your trikes engine, but if it's in good shape, it should have plenty of power, more than could be handled in rough terrain without some serious physical strength and riding skill. The hard-tail trikes can still put modern rides to shame in the right conditions, they just demand a lot more from the rider.

 

As far as two cycle engines, they are not nearly as tolerant to water as four cycle engines. Dunk a  two cycles engine, and there's a good chance the bottom end gets trashed. As long as the crankcase of a four cycle engine isn't filled with water, it can be restarted after a quick dunk without too much worry about major, immediate problems. I've personally seen several four cycle engines that got a serious dunking and survived for a long time, after multiple oil changes to get all the water out of the crankcase. That's not to say the engine life was decreased, but a two cycle engine will die much more quickly after something like that.

 

You'll have to mix gas with a two cycle. With a worn-out four cycle, it mixes oil with gas automatically, in the combustion chamber, you just have to keep the oil topped off.

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