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Honestly at a lost on where I should post this.

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398676_10150554341437638_659972637_9203518_879175040_n.jpg

The chewed up gear (thanks to the idiot mechanic before me) is pressed into the crank, I've tried heating it and nothing to get it out... Anyone have any suggestions...

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The crank is brand new that gear is for a water pump on a 99 KX500. The gear is pressed in.

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a few options i can think of, get a washer machined out of stainless steel to fit sungly around the end of the gear, weld it on all the way around with a TIG welder, then make a slide hammer out of a piece of 16mm round bar, a relatively heavy cylinder with a 17mm hole drilled though the center and a cap welded onto one end of the round bar, weld the slide hammer onto the stainless washer at the other end with the cylinder on the round bar, let everything sit overnight so it cool's completely, heat the crank and use the slide hammer to drive the gear out.

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how hard is the gear? can you drill it tap and then make a puller to pull it out?

it's a gear, it's going to be extremely hard and almost impossible to drill, tool steel is usually softer then gear's, and even tungsten carbide cutting tips i dont think will cut it.

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I would use a high-speed cutting wheel, or possibly a carbide burr (try, see if it cuts in). cut through the remaining gear until int is thin. Work very slowly as you get close. When it is very thin, use a punch to fracture the remaining thin piece. This will releace the interference, and it will pull right off. I've never done this with a gear, but have successfully removed countless bearing races this way both inner and outer. It will work. Nothing will resist the highspeed cutting wheel. The bearing will be contaminated junk when done. Removing it first (it apprears as if the race will clear it?) will give you more room to work the gear accurately. Try to aim the thin spot to hit a land not a groove.

Edited by 36MotoMarc

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if it is too hard to drill and tap then I would try welding something to it that I could grab. I would use a bolt for a forcing screw and use a puller but the knock hammer idea is a good one. if that fails then I would use the dremel tool with a handfull of abrasive stones and follow the idea posted right above me.

the finall resort is to buy a new crank half

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Can you post another pic, looking down. Im seeing another problem but am not sure. The splined end of the crank, just after the main bearing looks chewed up pretty bad. That is where the primary gear goes. If thats the case, new or not, I wouldnt mess with that crank. I saw somewher else that you are going for some pretty high power levels and that WILL be a weak point.

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I agree with zz3gmc and also if the splines weren't messed up the gear would just slide off, they are not pressed on.

Ed

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http://a7.sphotos.ak...132340384_n.jpg

This is the only pic I have off-hand. It's dark out and the camera isn't focusing properly.

I can assure you there is no other damage to the crank other than this gear. What you're seeing is residual oil. Also, if you care to take a look at the cheapcycleparts diagram for a 98 kx500, that gear is certainly pressed in. Lots of good ideas here. Appreciate the responses.

Edited by Bodyrot

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After doing some research it appears that the gear is pressed in. Some people mentioned that they drilled a hole in the center and used a extractor to pull it out, some used heat. When and if you get it out, heat up the crank and freeze the new gear. It should go back in without too much of an issue.

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i'd do as one person mentioned and use a cut off wheel. thats if you dont have access to a press or a gear puller.

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, heat up the crank and freeze the new gear. It should go back in without too much of an issue.

No, this will make it harder. FREEZE the crank, HEAT the gear in the oven or on a hotplate. Still be prepared to drive or press it on. That is, after you cut it off, 5 minutes, no fanfare or welding.

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Access to tools isn't an issue. But 36moto I would have to disagree that heating the gear and freezing the crank to press it would work. Metal expands with heat and "shrinks" with cold. Why would we want to expand the metal of the gear and "shrink" the diameter of the hole it's being pressed in by freezing the crank? That would make it incredibly harder than the opposite. This is why you heat seized nuts/bolts in hope the insulation (slight gap between the 2 metals not being "one" solid piece) between the threads makes enough of a gap to break the seize.

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No, this will make it harder. FREEZE the crank, HEAT the gear in the oven or on a hotplate. Still be prepared to drive or press it on. That is, after you cut it off, 5 minutes, no fanfare or welding.

That gear presses into the inside of the crank.so zz3gmc had it correct on the install.

You need a separator like the one

OTC1127.jpg

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That gear presses into the inside of the crank.so zz3gmc had it correct on the install.

You need a separator like the one

OTC1127.jpg

We have a few sets of these. I wasn't sure if it could get in-between the pinch. I was also in fear that if it couldn't get into the pinch, that the gear is a harder material than the tool and damage the tool.

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