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Effect of Fork Rebound on Turning

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I have a 2006 YZ250 two stroke that I want to improve the turning on. I tried a set of 22.5mm offset clamps and it turned great, but the bike became much too unstable, so I'll be going back to the stock offset. I read some threads saying that adjusting fork rebound can greatly reduce front end push (especially on flat turns or turns without deep ruts). If I want to reduce the front end push, would I decrease the rebound? And what is the consequence if I decrease the fork rebound too much?

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This may sound odd but lowering the yz about a inch really helps turning, esp in the corners you mention , I went to the different offset as well and it worked well but no rmz

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Never had much luck adjusting rebound for better turning if the bikes chassis is that off to begin with, unless the rebound spec is way off? Generally high speed sweepers less rebound for a quicker return and more pressure on the front wheel. Tight turns more rebound to help hold the front end down.

To much rebound and the front end packs down and gets harsh as its slow to return for the next bump.

To little rebound (like most stock YZ's) the front end has to much spring back and feels loose an unstable, pogos to much and that causes front end traction to be inconsistant.

You want the front end to have a calm planted feel thats quick enough on return to absorb all bumps.

Edited by 455

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Mog, funny you mention that about the YZ's.

I just put an Ohlins TTX shock on mine, and when I first put it on I was in a huge rush to get out to a race and never got to check the sag. Felt really damn good. Within some clicker tuning of being great. Improvement everywhere.

Then I checked my sag. 50mm/125mm for static/rider. Damn...

Set it at 25mm/~100mm. Went for a ride today. &%$#@!. All over the place. Sketchy as all hell. Unstable in corners. Couldn't even tell how the front end was knifing because the back end was just all over the place. On the descents the back end felt like it was coming off the ground through any rough stuff and wouldn't get braking traction coming into corners.

Why is everyone so set on 100mm of sag for bikes? Every bike I've set up with "proper sag" has ended up feeling terrible. I think you might be onto something with this lowering idea. I've read in a few places lately about the fast pro offroad guys running a softer spring, and getting numbers around 25-30mm static sag and around 115mm rider sag. Care to tell more about your testing with it (or have links to old threads with discussion about it)?

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Mog ment lowering the bike front and rear 1 inch as YZ's are so tall. Not just the back end.

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Gotcha. I thought it turned superbly with the sagged out rear and the -2 offset front axle in my case. The Ohlins front end seems to like ~40mm sag which it has now. On paper that geo would give a super pushy front end but it handled great.

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