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Technique for transition from downhill to uphill

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I need a bit of help (well really a lot :bonk:) on an obstacle I can't seem to figure out. I hit a spot in one of our sections last weekend with a fairly steep downhill (say better than 45 degrees) that ended in a V ditch and then went up the other side at about the same angle. Normally, if there was a straight approach I would try to stop and balance with the front wheel in the cut and then rock back with power on to get the bike to rotate. The problem with this section, was that the approach to the cut was at an angle and my technique just resulted in the front wheel tucking. I watched some other folks pull the front up as they went down the slope and place it on the opposing bank (think a downhill controlled wheelie) but I'm about clueless on how to do it without just driving the front end into the ditch (and yes I did that too).

Help and kind jokes will be much appreciated :lol:

Joe

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I don't think anyone can visualize your description well enough to give good advice. It would help to know what class you were ridng.

If you're riding one of the lower classes don't hesitate to ask the observer how to do it (when he or she is not observing a ride). The observer may be a more experienced rider as well as having watched the other riders negotiating the same obstacle.

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Dont feel bad, I think those can be really tough. We had an event section that had a downhill approach directly into a small (maybe 16" high) but undercut rock and many good riders were unable to get the front end up with the correct timing and finesse to zap the rock. The ones that made it look easy really loaded the front end with dramatic knee action towards the front of the bike and used the recoil of the suspension with a well timed tug/unload (straight up - not pulling towards the back - and then pushing the front end forward AFTER they got the wheel up) and a quick clutch pop on the unload side of the stroke. Lots going on in a short amount of time and took a tremendous commitment to the move. The other thing I noticed was that the good riders started the whole movement further back to account for the extra change in attitude of the bike and got the front pretty high and dropped it onto the rock - not into it. (took more time and distance to get it to pivot and add the extra height) If they did all that right, they made the small zap over the rock w/o problems. This was in an advanced section - not novice.

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Thanks Lazer, that helped a bunch. I "think" my biggest issue was starting all this too far down the hill. I ride intermediate and this particular piece of the section was right at the advanced level.

Much appreciated.

Joe

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Gotta use much more body than power.. Picture rowing a boat where you are reaching way forward for the next power stroke. As you dig the oars in, you pull hard AND drive your feet in hard so that you can bring your back up with your arms.

You can practice this on a steep downhill with no up at the bottom by slowing way down and then add a little bump stop to compress the front a little more and immediately on the rebound, you do that rowing thing (rear brake on) and see if you can get the front tire up BEFORE you get much forward motion.

Avoid lots of power. It's done almost entirely with body input and as the front comes up, you release the rear brake and sort of LET the rear tire roll ahead and under you before the front continues forward progress.

Watch the guys that row the racing shells. They have moveable feet rests along with the sliding seats to allow them to use their legs and backs... same thing you should be doing on the bike. :bonk:

If you are standing too tall on the way down, it will not work.. butt way back and pressing down on the rear fender... you should be able to look at your crotch and see the tail light there.. your back will be low and flat and the knees also back there with your head low and arms stretching out to just reach the bars, not leaning on them.. all of your weight if possible is on the BACK of the foot pegs on the way down.

You can even just practice just that part of the move.. take some photos... and though the following photo is not on a steep downhill, I'm using the same body position.. note the angle of my knees, position of my butt to the rear light, low head and outstretched arms..(a smaller belly makes it a lot easier.. :lol: )

avatar3.jpg

And a good one from The Trials Training Center:

drop2.jpg

Edited by 2PLY

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Avoid lots of power. It's done almost entirely with body input and as the front comes up, you release the rear brake and sort of LET the rear tire roll ahead and under you before the front continues forward progress.

Thanks, this was what I was seeing the successful guys do, but I couldn't figure out how the heck they were getting the front end to rotate up. Between your post and Lazier's, I at least have enough of an idea on what I'm trying to do to not crash every time I try it. :bonk:

All kidding aside this stuff really helps

Much appreciated

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Oh sure - pick on the lazy guy..... :lol:

Who's picking on who? :bonk: .. In this sport, the better you get, the less work you actually have to do. But when you need "body input" I think you and I have the advantage.. eh? :lol:

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