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What do you use to seal gaskets? Do you bother with gaskets at all?

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Curious what everyone likes to use for gasket sealing and if you even bother with gaskets in some cases.

I need to take off the right side cover on the bike to drill and tap the oil check hole that I stripped out. I'm still trying to decide if I can just fill it up with JB weld and forget about it without taking the cover off. Which ever way I go, I don't plan to touch it again once it's set.

But assuming I do it right and take the cover off, that got me wondering what you should use for sealant. Cheapest I can find the gasket is $15, which then got me wondering if you'd even bother with the gasket at all given the range of sealants which are available.

I know not using a gasket in some cases can be a problem when close tolerences are involved, but I'm not sure what's under the cover (just ordered a shop manual).

So:

a. would you bother with the gasket and if not, what would you use in place of it?

b. if you did, what would you seal it with?

Jim.

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I would always use a gasket where one is specified.

I haven't found any gaskets that are equal to OEM Honda, so I will only use OEM.

I never use sealant on or in place of a gasket.

OEM Honda gaskets only require a light coat of oil on both sides.

On surfaces where there is no gasket specified, I use a sealant called "Threebond 1194".

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Being a heavy equipment mechanic, I use Caterpillar branded sealants. I've tried them all and, and the CAT stuff is superior to anything else on the market and anyone can buy them from a CAT dealer. There's many different types of sealants available for a wide range of applications. I won't get into that now, as the list and description would be too long. That being said, for the case covers, there is no better way than to just use an OEM gasket on a clean surface. No sealant at all. Don't try to save money by using some goop in place of a gasket. You'll save yourself the headaches of a leaky cover. The surfaces on the Honda cases are machined perfectly, and when installed properly, the gasket will never leak.

Most importantly, everything behind that cover was designed with the thickness of that gasket in mind, such as the water pump drive. Do it right, buy the gasket.

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Always use a gasket, (OEM only) for me. Also I usually by two of whatever i'm working on. That way you will have a spare or if you tear one or need to remove the part again.... :bonk:

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Thanks for the input.

Any comments on just using JB weld to plug the hole? My gut says do it right (take off the cover and drill and helicoil it), but it bugs the heck out of me that I need to do that just because of a manual mis-print and I don't ever plan to use it again. I'm not sure either if there is anything under the cover that I can get myself into trouble with.

Haven't worked on a motor in ages...(that's why I asked what everyone was using now a days for sealants).

Jim.

Edited by JimDettman

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What CRFdoc said.

That's kind of what I thought, but I wasn't sure if gaskets should be applied without sealant's or not. I used to use permatex gasket glue just to keep a gasket from shifing around, but it looks like the cover is doweled/pinned so it can't move.

Jim.

Edited by JimDettman

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I would always use a gasket where one is specified.

I haven't found any gaskets that are equal to OEM Honda, so I will only use OEM.

I never use sealant on or in place of a gasket.

OEM Honda gaskets only require a light coat of oil on both sides.

On surfaces where there is no gasket specified, I use a sealant called "Threebond 1194".

Bad idea on the oiling of the new gaskets. Surfaces need to be clean and free of oil and old gasket material. Oiling the new gasket is asking for a leak, and not proper technique.

The only place on a crf450 that needs a little sealant is the stator lead @left side cover. Hondabond 4 takes care of that. The airbox boot also calls for some rubber cement to seal.

Edited by Dust_Devil

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Curious what everyone likes to use for gasket sealing and if you even bother with gaskets in some cases.

I need to take off the right side cover on the bike to drill and tap the oil check hole that I stripped out. I'm still trying to decide if I can just fill it up with JB weld and forget about it without taking the cover off. Which ever way I go, I don't plan to touch it again once it's set.

But assuming I do it right and take the cover off, that got me wondering what you should use for sealant. Cheapest I can find the gasket is $15, which then got me wondering if you'd even bother with the gasket at all given the range of sealants which are available.

I know not using a gasket in some cases can be a problem when close tolerences are involved, but I'm not sure what's under the cover (just ordered a shop manual).

So:

a. would you bother with the gasket and if not, what would you use in place of it?

b. if you did, what would you seal it with?

Jim.

Coil the hole and use the stock plug screw.

Use a new OEM gasket and smile at the job done correctly.

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Bad idea on the oiling of the new gaskets. Surfaces need to be clean and free of oil and old gasket material. Oiling the new gasket is asking for a leak, and not proper technique.

The only place on a crf450 that needs a little sealant is the stator lead @left side cover. Hondabond 4 takes care of that. The airbox boot also calls for some rubber cement to seal.

I cannot agree with this statement. Of course you need clean surfaces free of old gasket material, dirt, etc. but a light coating of grease is the best "sealant" a gasket you can use. It allows the gasket to move around just a bit so it does not bind and conforms to the surfaces better. I ALWAYS use a light coating of grease on all gaskets except head gaskets, they go on dry. I've had good luck with Cometic brand gaskets as well as the OEM.

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No oil, no grease on a gasket, bad idea. Honda gaskets (along with most others in this world) are supposed to be installed dry, onto a clean dry surface.

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Been applying a light oil on gaskets for years and never had one leak. Ever. Never ever.

Also makes it easier when you have to get back in there again.

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I wouldn't oil a cylinder head gasket, but a film of oil on a clutch cover gasket won't hurt anything as long as there are no gouges of grit on the sealing surfaces of the metal parts.

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Light oiling of gaskets ONLY pertains to paper/composite gaskets. The ones used to seal case halves and case covers.

The oiling causes the gaskets to begin the swelling process and makes the gasket better able to conform to irregularities in the surface that it is intended to seal.

The coated metal gaskets used on the head and cylinder should be used dry as they have a sealant applied in the manufacturing process that adheres to the metal once the heat cycling begins.

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Light oiling of gaskets ONLY pertains to paper/composite gaskets. The ones used to seal case halves and case covers.

The oiling causes the gaskets to begin the swelling process and makes the gasket better able to conform to irregularities in the surface that it is intended to seal.

The coated metal gaskets used on the head and cylinder should be used dry as they have a sealant applied in the manufacturing process that adheres to the metal once the heat cycling begins.

Totally agree with this.

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Light oiling of gaskets ONLY pertains to paper/composite gaskets. The ones used to seal case halves and case covers.

The oiling causes the gaskets to begin the swelling process and makes the gasket better able to conform to irregularities in the surface that it is intended to seal.

The coated metal gaskets used on the head and cylinder should be used dry as they have a sealant applied in the manufacturing process that adheres to the metal once the heat cycling begins.

Gaskets are not intended to nor do they need to "swell" to do their job (at least not in 450 Honda engines) Honda gaskets sometimes have a bead of some kind of sealant built right into them, the gasket between the cases and the right and left side covers are as such.

Oiling or greasing the paper gaskets used in Honda engines is not the correct way to do things, sure you can do it, but it is not the correct method.

Edited by Dust_Devil

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Oiling or greasing the paper gaskets used in Honda engines is not the correct way to do things, sure you can do it, but it is not the correct method.

You are free to go through life believing that your way is always best. It will not cause me to change my ways that I have determined to be the best through my experience.

Or I could have just said " Sez you."

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Like I said before, go ahead and oil them, but it is not correct or the accepted method for any mechanic I know. Hack mechanics always have a "better" way to do things it seems.

Just for fun I went and saw my boy Jack, he has been wrenching on bikes for 47 years and a certified Honda Technician for 28 years. He laughed when I asked him if he oils gaskets before install. "clean and dry" that is the only way to do the job correctly.

People come to TT for advice, sometimes people give bad advice (like oiling gaskets prior to install) I cant help point out the bad advice so someone that does not know any better does not screw up their bike.

Have a nice day and keep on oiling them up!

Edited by Dust_Devil

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Like I said before, go ahead and oil them, but it is not correct or the accepted method for any mechanic I know. Hack mechanics always have a "better" way to do things it seems.

Just for fun I went and saw my boy Jack, he has been wrenching on bikes for 47 years and a certified Honda Technician for 28 years. He laughed when I asked him if he oils gaskets before install. "clean and dry" that is the only way to do the job correctly.

People come to TT for advice, sometimes people give bad advice (like oiling gaskets prior to install) I cant help point out the bad advice so someone that does not know any better does not screw up their bike.

Have a nice day and keep on oiling them up!

Yawn. I'm bored with you.

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A VERY thin layer of Hondabond is good insurance against leaks in my experience. Holds gasket in place while aligning cases. It doesn't harden like other sealants and makes future removal easy.

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