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Trouble adjusting to the thumper!

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Recently purchased my first thumper (2012 450sxf, I love it!) after riding 2 strokes my entire life and I'm having some issues adjusting...

I ride only MX and I'm stalling in turns a few times a day and it's driving me nuts. I'm probably riding this thing too much like a 2 stroke. What are some good pointers for those of you that were long time 2 stroke riders that made the change to a thumper?

I've heard a million times to stop using the clutch but I think I'd only be stalling more if I did that! I like to come into corners hot and braking late, no clutch would surely = stalls while I'm on on the binders hard and I think that's what I think is happening to me now as I'm just not getting the clutch in fast enough those few times I kill it....

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Recently purchased my first thumper (2012 450sxf, I love it!) after riding 2 strokes my entire life and I'm having some issues adjusting...

I ride only MX and I'm stalling in turns a few times a day and it's driving me nuts. I'm probably riding this thing too much like a 2 stroke. What are some good pointers for those of you that were long time 2 stroke riders that made the change to a thumper?

I've heard a million times to stop using the clutch but I think I'd only be stalling more if I did that! I like to come into corners hot and braking late, no clutch would surely = stalls while I'm on on the binders hard and I think that's what I think is happening to me now as I'm just not getting the clutch in fast enough those few times I kill it....

STAY ON THE GAS. Something i learned from the 125 to the 250f when you hit a corner. Its all about smooth throttle control and consistent power delivery. take your clutch lever off and go ride the track without it. you'll learn really fast not to use it. just be careful if you go to brake click in the air... haha that's how bubbas dad taught him and to save money on broken levers.

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I know the hardest thing for me when i got my 450 was keeping it high enough in the rpms. If your 450 is getting low enough in the rpms going through the corner you are stalling then you need to be a gear down. Just because a 450 has low end power doesn't mean that the rpm range it needs to be ridden. The only time i use a clutch on the 450 is coming out of the corner to find traction, not to keep the bike moving. Usually you want to break as hard as you can right att he point before the back tire will break loose, if your going fast enough and do kill it if you leave the clutch out it should bump start.

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I agree with the guys above. I've ridden a wide variety of thumpers and pingers on the same day, swapping between bikes every other moto. The big thing about thumpers is the speed building. You can't build speed and expect it to exist when you hit the obstacle, wether that is a corner or jump. So you've gotta get in the habit of using "maintenance throttle" which is discussed above.

You can ride a 250F like a 125 no problem, lots of high RPM running, keep on the pipe exiting corners, keep on the pip up jump faces, etc. It feels very weird to ride a 4 stroke that way, but if you do, you will never stall it in corners. Stay away from that rear brake, 4 strokes have a built-in rear brake, its called engine breaking.

Other then those tips and the ones given above, thats pretty much what you need to think about when riding.

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i found i had to initiate leaning into the corner much earlier, you wait too long and you'll feel like you are wrestling the bike the whole time, lean it low and it will force you to accelerate hard through the corner, cant just break the rear end loose to correct like on a 2 stroke

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I had the same issues... actually stalling during the transition between braking and throttle, I found that instead of apexing a corner like I would on my smoker, comming in hot, slamming on the brakes and dumping the clutch and feathering as much as needed out of the corner to get as much drive as possible. On the 450 its much easier and faster to rail the corner, get your brake work out of the way before the corner and throttle through it. Not only did I get much faster on the thumper but I also stopped stalling doing this.

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The rear brake is key in mx and offroad, you must be able to use both brakes equally well to go fast. Stay on the gas and keep the rmps up and it wont stall. I bet the bike is stalling because the clutch isnt pulled at the right time or not enough gas is being aplied. I have also found four strokes easier to stall and harder to start. If the 2t stalls big deal one kick and its back in action. Not often the case with the thumper.

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I wasn't really having an issue with stalling, but the Rekluse is a dream! It is the answer to the question you didn't know to ask on a 4 stroke. I put one on my KX not long after I got it and just love the way it makes racing so much easier. I still clutch it into the turns most of the time, but it really is uneccesary, and it accelerates like a rocket because the clutch engages so much smoother than you can do it manually. The hardest thing I had to adjust to is chopping the throttle on jumps like I did on my 2t. A few close calls when the front end drops like that and you adapt quickly.

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Some good advice i read above, some I strongly disagree with. My input is:

You've got 5 controls. Usa all of them if you need to. The no clutch or the no rear brake ideas I strongly disagree with.

Silence is your enemy. Keep that thumper making noise, even if it's only part throttle with the clutch slipping. It's still on the gas.

Inside to inside lines are hard to do on a thumper. Change them. Middle-inside-middle work better thru a corner. This lets you get all your braking done earlier then right back on the gas before the apex of the corner.

Charge hard to the corner, engine brake-front/rear brake to slow and also puts weight transfer to front tire. 4T's steer with the front tire much more so than the 2T's. Set your bike up so it can steer with the power on.

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If you don't carry a lot of speed through the corners then knock her down 2 gears when you come in, this will slow you down, help keep the rear wheel planted a bit, keep you from stalling and put you in the revs once you make the transition from breaking to accelerating.

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I made the switch from riding a 250 two-stroke to a 400XR regularly. Granted, it may not be the same as riding a 450sx, but there are some similarities.

A four-stroke doesn't spin up as easily as a two-stroke. However, a two-stroke doesn't remaing spinning as easily. When someone told you to stop using the clutch they probably didn't mean all together. It is much easier to keep a big four stroke motor tugging along by just keeping it in the right gear along with a tiny amount of throttle. Versus the ease of spinning up a two-stroke quickly.

I am going to try to keep it simple. Just try selecting a gear lower than you normally would entering a corner. Then do not touch the clutch at all through the turn. May be a little slower at first. The purpose is to show how low the rpm's can go before stalling when you are not taking a big load on the motor by popping the clutch low rpms.

Practice braking no clutch and trying to hear your chain slapping. This will give you a goal to shoot for while improving your skills.

Edited by motoxhead

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