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XR650L: Spud’s Oil Cooler

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Incidentally, I could easily get another 1/2-inch of clearance between the front wheel and my oil cooler, using my current hardware. Using bent pipe and compression fittings, one could probably mount this oil cooler even higher. Therefore, clearance with the front wheel isn't an issue, as long as the front fender is trimmed high enough so the front wheel doesn't grab it, and lock up, long before the wheel would have impacted the oil cooler. :thumbsup:

Spud :thumbsup:

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If you could add some air shrouds to the sides of your oil cooler, they would direct a lot more air through it. Stick your hand down by the motor going 60 mph, you'll be surprised at how little air is moving down there.

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I got a little wet at one point, but I still made several, freeway test runs of my oil cooler today. My latest fender modification was successful. Riding the same stretch of freeway that yielded a high oil temperature of 279 degrees yesterday, my high oil temperature was 248 degrees today. :thumbsup:

I also rode the same section of freeway that yielded a high oil temperature of 255 degrees without my front fender mounted. Today, with my modified fender mounted, I reached a high oil temperature of 253 degrees. Riding back home along this same stretch of freeway, I encountered very strong headwinds that kept my speed at 75 mph while riding wide-open-throttle. My high oil temperature under these conditions was 235 degrees.

This oil cooler installation works very well. :lol: Other than the XR650R C/S sprocket, I think this is the best modification I have made to my XR650L. :doh: I am very pleased with the current configuration of my oil cooler; at this point I don't plan to make any further changes. I will certainly report if I encounter any difficulties with this installation.

Another forum member promised to loan me his XRs Only temperature gauge next week. After riding a few miles with his oil dipstick thermometer, I will report the difference in temperature between my temperature probe located near the engine, and the oil dipstick thermometer located in the oil reservoir. :thumbsup:

Spud :thumbsup:

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I got a little wet at one point, but I still made several, freeway test runs of my oil cooler today. My latest fender modification was successful. Riding the same stretch of freeway that yielded a high oil temperature of 279 degrees yesterday, my high oil temperature was 248 degrees today. :lol:

I also rode the same section of freeway that yielded a high oil temperature of 255 degrees without my front fender mounted. Today, with my modified fender mounted, I reached a high oil temperature of 253 degrees. Riding back home along this same stretch of freeway, I encountered very strong headwinds that kept my speed at 75 mph while riding wide-open-throttle. My high oil temperature under these conditions was 235 degrees.

This oil cooler installation works very well. :doh: Other than the XR650R C/S sprocket, I think this is the best modification I have made to my XR650L. :cry: I am very pleased with the current configuration of my oil cooler; at this point I don't plan to make any further changes. I will certainly report if I encounter any difficulties with this installation.

Another forum member promised to loan me his XRs Only temperature gauge next week. After riding a few miles with his oil dipstick thermometer, I will report the difference in temperature between my temperature probe located near the engine, and the oil dipstick thermometer located in the oil reservoir. :thumbsup:

Spud :thumbsup:

I can hear it now "But officer, I had to run wide open throttle to test my oil cooler. I am not a scofflaw, this is science!" :thumbsup:

On a more serious note. It is great to see some actually collect data with their oil cooler so others can make informed decisions. Great work Spud!

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I can hear it now "But officer, I had to run wide open throttle to test my oil cooler. I am not a scofflaw, this is science!" :lol:

On a more serious note. It is great to see some actually collect data with their oil cooler so others can make informed decisions. Great work Spud!

:doh:

Thank you, Red. :cry: At one point in my test ride it started to rain pretty hard, so I decided to turn around, and head back in the opposite direction. I noticed a turn around in the median, but I was in the right lane, so I passed it before I could exit onto it. :thumbsup: Therefore, I slowed down and pulled off the right side of the freeway. After all the traffic had passed me, I remembered I was on an XR650L, so I just crossed the median, and started heading the opposite direction. :thumbsup: Median turn arounds? We don't need no stinkin' median turn arounds! :lol:

Spud :thumbsup:

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I got a little wet at one point, but I still made several, freeway test runs of my oil cooler today. My latest fender modification was successful. Riding the same stretch of freeway that yielded a high oil temperature of 279 degrees yesterday, my high oil temperature was 248 degrees today. :thumbsup:

I also rode the same section of freeway that yielded a high oil temperature of 255 degrees without my front fender mounted. Today, with my modified fender mounted, I reached a high oil temperature of 253 degrees. Riding back home along this same stretch of freeway, I encountered very strong headwinds that kept my speed at 75 mph while riding wide-open-throttle. My high oil temperature under these conditions was 235 degrees.

This oil cooler installation works very well. :lol: Other than the XR650R C/S sprocket, I think this is the best modification I have made to my XR650L. :doh: I am very pleased with the current configuration of my oil cooler; at this point I don't plan to make any further changes. I will certainly report if I encounter any difficulties with this installation.

Another forum member promised to loan me his XRs Only temperature gauge next week. After riding a few miles with his oil dipstick thermometer, I will report the difference in temperature between my temperature probe located near the engine, and the oil dipstick thermometer located in the oil reservoir. :thumbsup:

Spud :thumbsup:

Sweet.. that will make a HUGE difference in terms of engine life.

I would recomend you look at the Acerbis Super moto fender dude. Serious venting there, I had my hand over the cooler @ 60mph, had excellent flow

over the cooler.

Im really curious as to what you see with the XR's only dipstck temp gauge vs. that digital. That said, Im showing on mine to be running about

250 to 255 ,,, apx.

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Thanks for the feedback, Mudd. :thumbsup:

Incidentally, please note, I saw a 31 degree drop in oil temperature yesterday merely by cutting a hole in the front fender. This temperature reduction was observed after my oil cooler was installed with a drilled fender. :thumbsup: Therefore, my oil temperature reduction from stock configuration must be even higher than 31 degrees. :thumbsup:

Spud :lol:

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Thanks for the input,Garth. :thumbsup: I like the TTO, digital temperature gauge. Reading the TTO gauge is easier than reading a speedometer. I only need to take a quick glance to read the oil temperature. :thumbsup:

Spud :thumbsup:

where did you get the brass tee for the probe? i have a temp sensor for my vapor and that would be a good place for it. what size are the outlets on the tee and are they npt or what?

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I bought a 1/8", NPT, female tee from Fastenal. I also bought two, 1/8" male, NPT x 3/8 hose barb adapters. The TTO temperature gauge has a 1/8" BSPP probe. Therefore, I bought a 1/8" male NPT X 1/8" female BSPP adapter, so I would not get any leaks between the tee and the temperature probe. All the NPT fittings are also available at most auto parts stores, except for the BSPP to NPT adapter. :thumbsup:

Spud :thumbsup:

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On Tuesday a local, XR650L owner loaned me his XRs Only temperature dipstick. Therefore, I was able to take a ride and compare the oil temperatures between my TTO Temperature Gauge and the oil reservoir.

tempdipsticktest007.jpg

As you can see in the following photograph, the oil cooler receives an unobstructed airflow over the front wheel, and below the front fender.

tempdipsticktest010.jpg

The above and below photographs also reveal the oil lines are well protected by the forks and their high location inside the outer edge of the fuel tank.

tempdipsticktest012.jpg

The motorcycle must warm up a bit before the temperature of the oil in the reservoir stabilizes. :thumbsup: However, after the temperature stabilizes, the oil temperature in the reservoir is 25 degrees cooler than the oil temperature exiting the engine, when the bike is idling. After riding about 50 miles, I took the following photograph of oil temperatures with the engine idling.

tempdipsticktest004.jpg

As you can see, the TTO temperature probe located in the oil line before the oil cooler shows a temperature of 225 degrees, while the oil dipstick thermometer shows a temperature of 200 degrees.

After the engine is turned off, the temperature of the oil in the external lines and cooler quickly drops 30 degrees in several minutes. In contrast, the oil in the reservoir cannot radiate the heat as well, and the temperature remains elevated. I took the following photograph about 3 minutes after turning off my bike’s engine. The oil temperature in the cooler has dropped to 94 degrees, but the oil in the reservoir is 125 degrees.

tempdipsticktest036.jpg

If you wait longer before starting the engine, the temperature of the oil in the external lines and oil cooler drops even more. After stopping to take some photographs and enjoy the scenery, I recorded the temperature difference in the following photograph. The temperature at the TTO probe is 97 degrees, while the temperature in the oil reservoir is 160 degrees.

tempdipsticktest021.jpg

tempdipsticktest040.jpg

When pushing the bike to it’s maximum oil temperature, the temperate at the TTO probe and the oil reservoir are identical. Indeed, this must be the case. If the temperature of the oil in the reservoir is lower, the reservoir temperature must continue to rise until the two temperatures are equal, or a maximum temperature cannot be reached. :applause:

tempdipsticktest044.jpg

During most of my ride today, the oil temperature at the TTO probe was 10 to 15 degrees hotter than the temperature at the oil dipstick. The temperature difference is greatest at idle and low engine rpms. The temperature difference decreases as the engine load and engine rpms increase; the two temperatures are identical at the maximum oil temperature of the system.

tempdipsticktest042.jpg

After exited the off ramp from an extended, wide-open-throttle run on the freeway, the oil cooler quickly drops the temperature of the oil it sends to the reservoir. Even after riding about ½ mile, and pausing at several stop lights, the following photograph shows my cooler dropped the temperature of the oil in the reservoir 28 degrees before I parked the bike outside Wal-Mart. The oil coming from the engine is 253 degrees, but the oil inside the reservoir is 225 degrees.

tempdipsticktest048.jpg

Please note, in this instance, reading the dipstick thermometer alone would be deceiving, since the oil coming from the hot engine is still 253 degrees. It takes a short time for the cooler oil in the reservoir to quench the hotter oil still inside the engine. :)

I can easily keep oil temperature below 240 degrees if I ride at 65-70 mph on the freeway. When I push the bike continuously, wide-open-throttle for 40 miles or more, I can get a maximum oil temperature of 258 degrees, before the temperatures from both thermometers equalize. Running less than wide-open-throttle will always show the TTO temperature probe running at least 5 degrees hotter than the dipstick thermometer in the oil reservoir.

Spud :banghead:

Edited by SpudRider

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After much pondering and head scratching I decided to drink the Kool-Aid. Here is my iteration. An amalgam if you will.

DSCN4513.jpg

Not wanting to weld, I modified a U-bolt and jury-rigged some hose clamps to mount the cooler.

DSCN4514.jpg

DSCN4517.jpg

I wanted to isolate some vibrations, so I used some pieces of round baler belt between the cooler and frame.

DSCN4516.jpg

I cut out a portion of the oil tube and repositioned the top and bottom pieces.

DSCN4512.jpg

DSCN4522.jpg

The bottom.

DSCN4521.jpg

The top.

The loop of hose is intended to be long enough to reach the bottom tube in the event that the cooler is damaged.

DSCN4520.jpg

I gave her a short shakedown cruise just before dark tonight. No leaks so far(yea!). I'll get some pics of the finished project as soon as I can.

twerpy.

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I purchased SAE J1019, transmission oil hose from a local CarQuest store. I ordered five, 90-degree, brass hose barbs from a local hose supply shop. Since I wanted to install a Trail Tech, TTO Temperature Gauge, I also bought some brass fittings from Fastenal. Most of these fittings are also available at many auto supply stores.

I cut the external oil pipe just above the rubber grommet on the frame, and plumbed the oil line into the bottom of my oil cooler as shown in the photographs below. I plumbed the top line from the oil cooler into the line feeding the oil reservoir in the frame. I installed the temperature probe in the oil line between the engine and the oil cooler so I can get a continuous reading of the oil temperature as it exits the engine, before it enters the oil cooler. I secured the oil hoses to the bike’s frame using 5/8” loom clamps I bought from Home Depot. I drilled holes in the front fender, and shimmed the fender down with nylon spacers so it would clear the oil cooler.

002.jpg

SpudCoolerCompleted064.jpg

SpudCoolerCompleted065.jpg

SpudCoolerCompleted069.jpg

SpudCoolerCompleted070.jpg

SpudCoolerCompleted072.jpg

SpudCoolerCompleted075.jpg

SpudCoolerCompleted076.jpg

Spud :cry:

nice spud......looks like a heavy duty unit..

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It make a guy wonder if someone would tack a dozen or so fins on the down tube maybe parallel with the ground or a slight angle to catch some more air since the down tube holds oil if that might drop the temps some by making the down tube a cooler of its own ???

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It make a guy wonder if someone would tack a dozen or so fins on the down tube maybe parallel with the ground or a slight angle to catch some more air since the down tube holds oil if that might drop the temps some by making the down tube a cooler of its own ???

I think soundtech is on to something here. Would a heat sink bolted or clamped around the down tube offer enough heat transfer to cool the oil? Might have to sand the paint off the downtube to get better thermal transfer, but it is definitely an elegant solution!

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I have now ridden 6 thousand miles with my Spud Cooler installed. I am pleased to report this oil cooler works great, and I haven't had any problems with it whatsoever. :)

BillRogerwithChallis356.jpg

Spud :)

Edited by SpudRider

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Yep Spud, you take AWESOME photo's....thanks :thumbsup:

And I just did your Moose xr650r front sprocket swap on my L......went on with no probs, no grinding needed, and fits perfect......tight and solid like a front sprocket should be. Thanks a ton for all the knowledge you share.....guys like you make forums great :D:smirk::applause::thumbsup:

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As I said earlier, I suspect the front wheel might hit the oil cooler with full compression of the forks. :unsure: This is an important issue, so I want to provide some additional information. I have installed a lowering link, and raised my forks 1-inch in the triple tree. I don't know how much free sag I have with my current forks. The doctored photograph below shows approximately how much the front wheel can travel before it impacts the oil cooler on my lowered motorcycle.

forkcompressiontoshortenedfender052.jpg

I think I can raise the oil cooler about an inch, if necessary. I can also trim the rear of the fender so the wheel will not grab it long before it would impact the fender. When I get a chance, I will lift the front wheel and see how much free sag I have in my forks.

Spud :)

Hello spud.

I see that you have long ago put the Shorai battery on your bike,  works properly ?,  did you have to buy the charger of Shorai?, can you tell me some tips?.
thanks
CUL045

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