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Popular Content

Showing content with the highest reputation since 09/26/2021 in all areas

  1. I'm all about ThumperTalk for the community of dirt bikers that wouldn't know one another if not for the internet... But.... Daily I am blown away by the onslaught of ill formed questions that would not need to be asked if anyone would do the first thing you should ALWAYS do when acquiring a new machine: BUY THE FREAKING OEM FACTORY SERVICE MANUAL....!!!!!!!!! If you don't want all the specs and information straight from the company that designed and built your machine.... WTF is wrong with your brain?!? I can totally see people needing help with sorting things out after checking the manual, but I just can't imagine all the basic BS level questions asked .... Even down to things like oil changes and chain tightening ... I'm totally down with helping people ....after they have done what I consider the absolute minimum to help themselves with the PURCHASE OF THE OEM FACTORY SERVICE MANUAL...!!!!! Hard copy... Not pdf... So you can write tuning details and notes in it for future reference... I almost believe that the millennial generation needs a YouTube video to tie their shoes or wipe their ass... As if READING has become a lost dark art... This thread was finally inspired by a thread I had read this morning where links to videos were being posted for someone begging for help with oil change and chain tightening information.... There is absolutely nothing that guarantees the person in the video knows his ass from a hole in the ground, or himself owns an OEM FACTORY SERVICE MANUAL for his reference... Yet people take is as gospel... Hard to imagine.... Anyways.... Had to get that off my chest... Don't be so lazy and cheap as to not do the bare bones minimum and skip a few IPA's or White Claw Seltzer's or whatever you non manual buying Nancy Boys drink ...and save up for a manual... Do it.... The world will become a better place... One IQ point at a time 🤘👍😎
    16 points
  2. It's taken me a long time, but I finally bought myself a new Beta yesterday. The old 2012 450RR is looking a bit sorry for itself and has served me very well over hundreds of brilliant riding days, but it's time to upgrade. So I found a nice 2020 390RR, less than 18 months old and just 50hrs. Cost the owner 9500 Euros new back in Spring 2020 and he then bought a 1200 Euro CX Radius Rekluse for it which he never fitted. I got the whole lot for 7000 Euros. I'll sell the rekluse to fund a load of oil, filters, fuel, handguards, bash plate and a hand-rear-brake. Really looking forward to its first day in the mud.
    15 points
  3. Wheel Worx is relatively new on Thumper Talk as an industry contributor. However, I am certainly not new to off road motorcycles and more importantly off road wheels! In late 2019 a close friend had some popular brand Chinese bearings self-destruct on the rear of his Beta 300RR and this destroyed the hub. He came to me to see if I could repair his wheel. It was unfortunately toast! Then came the search for a new rear wheel. Beta was out of stock, no dealers had any, and he didn't really want to go the route of using a KTM wheel with cut down spacers, and then having to also have KTM sprockets for that wheel. We finally found him a used Beta wheel after 3 weeks. After that affair, I realized there weren't a lot of good options for aftermarket Beta wheels, made specifically for Beta. I spent the next 6 months vetting manufacturers, who would be able to produce quality forged billet hubs. Designs were reviewed, and I received a few samples. I decided to work with a manufacturer that would make hubs from a forged billet, not bar stock. Knowing that this was a more expensive route, but was a stronger end product. I then received sample hubs and test fit them on our Beta test mule. We made a few revisions to the overall design and did more prototypes, this time we built full wheels and tested them extensively. I took the dive went into production for hubs and wheels. The first products were ready late November of 2020, about 1 year from when the project started! I took the liberty of having KTM/Husky hubs and wheels made at the same time, along with a small run of Yamaha hubs as well. The Wheel Worx website was fully launched in December 2020 www.wheelwx.com The key product at the time was exact fit Beta wheels that use the OEM sprockets, identical spacers, bearings and seals as OEM, but with a forged billet hub, 2 bearings on the sprocket side, stronger stainless spokes, HD nipples, and a 7000 series aluminum rim. Hand built quality at a price everyone could afford. In addition to new wheels, Wheel Worx is a full service wheel shop. We repair and rebuild almost any OEM spoked wheel. In the past few years we have also done a good number of vintage wheels. Below are a custom rebuild of Sherco wheels, with spokes made in-house, blue Excel rims, and blue HD nipples. While the website focuses on core products - Beta, KTM, GasGas, and Yamaha wheels, if you don't see it, just ask. There are more products and parts that aren't posted on the website - such as KTM / Husky mini wheels for the 85s, 10" front wheel conversions for the KTM / Husky EE5, and more recently, exact fit Sherco wheels with hubs that take OEM spacers, sprockets, and discs. Sherco wheels with forged billet hubs. Many special requests are performed via custom builds with Excel or DID rims, powder or Cerakoting of OEM hubs, if you don't see something on our website just ask via our contact form or via phone call. Also Wheel Worx is one of the few East Coast full service wheel shops. We always have a healthy stock of quality bearings, seals, and spacers. We are an SKF dealer and have their special wheel seal and spacer kits, also SKF bearings. We have a large inventory of spokes and rims for most popular KTM, Husky, and Beta bikes and have many new products coming for early 2022. Wheel Worx also has our own brake discs manufactured from Japanese 410 steel that is tempered and heat treated. Soon to be available - KTM and Beta rear solid rotors, hopefully by late November 2021. Pair those with Innteck brake pads from Italy that we carry. Last, we have a number of AA / A riders running our wheels HARD in Enduro, Harescrambles, GNCC, and MX. Everything is tested, and feedback goes right into how to improve the products. Visit our website, and if there's any Wheel Worx branded products that interest you, take 5% off using the code thumpertalk5 at check-out! www.wheelwx.com
    14 points
  4. I will try an old fashioned ride report(my view). Well I just got home from probably the best ride of my life. We spent 4 days in Bishop, CA. Arrived there Thursday afternoon and checked into Brown's Town Campground. Got all set up and hung out with Gary, his daughter, Stephanie and wife, along with Ken, and Tony. It was pretty cold so we warmed up around the propane gas pit and planned our ride for the following morning. It was Papoose out and back. Andrew arrived that night about midnight. It was cloudy and the forcast was rain. It was pretty cold but I enjoyed it and for once I actually had plenty of energy; it rained on us and even a little snow. The first part of Papoose was boring dirt roads but there was talcum powder-type silt which made it interesting. One rider (name withheld :)) went down right in the powder-rutts and he was covered in silt. It looked bad but he got up laughing. I hit a puddle of the stuff and it blasted a cloud of silt about 10 feet high, covering me in the stuff, so after that I did everything possible to go around the silt rutts. We did find 1 single track trail which disappeared after a bit so I bushwacked it back to the road where I saw 2 people doing gun target practice right in the area where I was riding and where the rest of the group was going down. I asked them to stop and wait so we can get out of there before they start shooting again (1 of 2 shooting areas we came across). We then dual sported on pavement for several miles and finally got into some decent 2 track stuff. Rocky and elevation change which made it worthwhile coming off dirt roads. It was probably down to the mid 30s by then when we entered several miles of a deep sand wash ravine. I enjoyed it but it was a challenge. The extra effort warmed me up; however, the 10 PSI in the rear was too much air, so made it interesting. Stephanie killed it on her 180cc Beta (modified). Once out of the wash, Andrew had to fix his skip plate that lost a bolt and some had to warm up. After that we headed back up a Jeep trail and had a fun quick elevation downhill with turns and rocks so made it more exciting. We entered a beatiful meadow then back to the pavement and down to Big Pine where we ate for the first of two days of one of the best barbeque food in a while. The ride back to camp is not worth going over. We rode about 66 miles (?, already forgot). Gary made his famous and wonderful chicken tacos that night which were amazing. We enjoyed talking about our ride and planning for the next day's ride which was the best ride in my life (90 miles of fun). Attached are some pictures of Friday's ride.
    14 points
  5. Todays ride. 3 ‘Z’s. 3hrs. 50km mixed terrain riding out in the Rockies.
    14 points
  6. whatevs, at least he's out riding, not playing video games, and not wearing girls clothes
    14 points
  7. I was able to get out to Foresthill today and figured I'd share a quick ride report. Conditions were solid. Weather was spot on. Temps were high 40's to start and were in the mid-high 50s when I left. The dirt was not as tacky as a couple weeks ago, but still good traction. Rain will be needed soon though. Rode 4, 3, 1, and part of 4 again. Pretty limited on time, but made the most of it. I've owned a fair amount of bikes and this FE250 is very impressive. Definitely a blast to ride. Just really enjoyable. Will probably get back on the 2 stroke next ride, but it'll be tough to leave the FE in the garage.
    13 points
  8. It was a great ride. All three days were fun. No injuries, no breakdowns, and great weather for the most part. I stayed an extra day and went home on Monday. Big mistake. There was an epic windstorm all the way down 395 that we hit starting around Lone Pine. Winds were reported to be 30-40 mph with gusts up to 70 mph. The 14 at 395 was closed due to low visibility because of dust, which I can believe. A couple of spots on 395 visibility was down to about 10’. Took Garlock Road to get back on on the 14, and for one 100 yard stretch, visibility was 0. I slowed to a crawl and could not see the road at all. Ended up in the opposite lane and almost hit another car head on. It took me 5 1/2 hours to get home. It was no treat driving 30 mph on the freeway towing a 26 foot travel trailer. Came across at least 3 overturned big rigs and a pick-up towing a travel trailer that flipped over, blocked both of the southbound lanes near the KM turn-off. Fortunately, there was a two lane road paralleling 395 that we were diverted onto. Truly the worse drive I have ever made, made worse by pulling the trailer. Had I known, I would have stayed another day in Bishop. My 5 month old truck is going into the shop with sand blast damage. Here are some additional pictures. Andrew gets the award for most dramatic stream crossing on day three, pictured below.
    13 points
  9. Its definitely easier to change a couple jets than to put on a completely different carb, not to mention several hundred dollars cheaper. Of course, the worst part about the Lectron is that it's just not a very good carb. They should be ashamed of themselves for selling this 50 year old piece of shit for $500. It's really appalling. I guess that's part of the grift though. It's really expensive so there must be something to it right? Don't. Just don't.
    12 points
  10. The purchasing part of the actual dirtbike is the cheapest part of owing a dirtbike. Racing a full season runs be the better part of $30k a year. Tires, race fuel, exhaust, brakes, chain/sprockets, plastics, graphics, bars, grips, levers, footpegs, Rekluse, hotels, fuel driving to events, entry fees, broken parts, etc all quickly exceed what I paid for the bike. Plus I generally get more then half back when I sell the bike. I don't get all the other costs back...
    11 points
  11. Fourstroke bottom end torque is the biggest myth in the dirt bike world, and it's opposite, that smokers have none.
    11 points
  12. So, let's try reentering the forum here after riding all season and see how this goes. Going strictly technical forum post 🤭 It's now Fall and I've had many more opportunities to ride my brother's '21 X trainer. We have ridden a wide variety of terrain throughout this season. A lot flowing singletrack through Oregon woods, more open desert singletrack with less obstacles than traditional woods, very steep loose climbs in remote NE Oregon that rarely gets ridden, really tight singletrack where your bars must be cut to fit between the trees, even a practice endurocross track. Let's start with the bikes big strength, it's motor. The stock X trainer is pretty anemic, especially if you are an younger man and used to aggressive power delivery from traditional 2-strokes. My brother did a handful of mods as soon as he purchased the bike, including removing the PV spacer, choosing a more aggressive needle for jetting, removing the airbox lid, and removing the auxiliary PV spring. This let the motor breath some more and added some much needed pop. In this form the motor retains it's excellent linear smooth low end, but with a bit more snap to get you out of the bottom part of the power delivery quicker and more aggressively. I rode it I this form several times and although I was impressed, to me, it still didn't have enough bark off idle and the mid was still neutered. Great for slow technical riding, but for wanting to dial it up, I felt it wasn't up to some of our faster riding. So, FMF has a new Gnarly for the X trainer and my brother pulled the plug and purchased it. This transformed the power delivery in a positive manner. It now has that pop off idle and the mid-range is improved dramatically. It's still very linear and smooth, but feels like it's far more capable of keeping the momentum and pace as it's quicker revving and more hit. A winning combination that doesn't wear you out, but makes the motor far more capable for aggressive riding than stock. Next, the chassis. It's small and compact. It's not cramped in any way. The lower center of gravity allows you to grab traction in places that you don't expect. Of course, it allows the rider to pick lines, and move the bike around like a mtb. It's extremely light and nimble, but the smaller chassis keeps the bike very stable, another winning combination for woods riding. OK, the much maligned suspension. My brother never rode it stock, although we have a longtime riding buddy with X trainer and we've both ridden it in stock form several times over the years. My brother chose the full AMP treatment. Now, just for comparison sake, I have a custom suspension on my KTM 300xcw WP. I also had the full KYB's on my YZ450FX as well as owned many bikes including full Ohlins, closed cartridge, open chamber, etc. All I can say is Aaron at AMP knows what he's doing! This bike has no business being able to do what it does with 43mm forks, but it's legitimately fully capable of anything a 46 year old A rider can throw at it. So, bike now at 70+ hrs and counting and I'm extremely impressed. There isn't much it's lacking and doesn't give much up to a standard 300rr which I owed an '18. The X trainer with some mods is probably a bike that's better suited to the majority of average riders than a standard 300rr, especially if your riding traditional woods terrain. It's easy to ride, doesn't wear you out and still rewarding for aggressive riders once modded. A bike that is definitely worth considering and with the mods, the price is just over a standard 300rr completely stock.
    11 points
  13. Another afternoon riding around Talbingo NSW today was to the top of mount talbingo. Started at an altitude of 400m and finished at the top of the mountain at 1400m
    11 points
  14. Rode 130 miles or so today around Parke County, Indiana. Parke County has 32 covered bridges, many still in everyday use. And, lots of gravel roads, a few dirt roads and a couple of water crossings. Also, many wild critters including turkey vultures (okay) and black vultures (the kind that'll try to peck your eyes out). I'm retired now and I've put about 9,000 wonderful miles like this on my 2018 DRZ since I bought it slightly used in August 2020. Much appreciation for all the TT contributors out there ... You've been a lot of help.
    11 points
  15. Very rarely do I see other people/riders...this time of year occasionally a hunter, but that's only in areas close to fire roads. The rare instance where I do run into another rider on the trail, we are usually friends or at least know each other. Just this week I did a solo ride that started near 4k' and topped out at 8k'ish up among the Aspens. The turn around point was at a 150+ year old trapper cabin. Ended the ride on reserve(3.5 gallon tank) with cold/stormy autumn Sierra weather. I didn't see a single person on the whole ride...by virtue of packing a saw, I was the first person to ride part of this trail since last year.
    11 points
  16. Excited about this product update!👍 Looks like the topic of steel vs. aluminum was a hot one on TT just recently. ProX Launches All-New Ultralight Steel Rear Sprockets The Best of Both Worlds with a Lightweight Design and Proven Durability MENTOR, Ohio (October 5, 2021) – ProX Racing Parts’ vast line of drivetrain components have proven true to the quality, durability and affordability of the ProX name for many seasons, and they are excited to announce the evolution of their steel rear sprocket offering with the all-new Ultralight sprockets. ProX steel rear sprockets have been proven in highly demanding racing situations, including worldwide Enduro as well as GNCC and Hare and Hound in the U.S. While the service life has always been a key advantage, ProX engineers set out to revise the steel sprocket with the goal of achieving the best of both worlds - the extreme durability of ProX's steel construction with the advantages of less weight. An all-new, lightweight design gives ProX Ultralight steel rear sprockets up to a 35% weight savings over other standard steel sprockets. The high-strength, steel construction provides superior longevity even in extreme riding conditions, ultimately translating to 2 to 3 times the usable life compared to average aluminum sprockets. ProX Ultralight sprockets are CNC-machined to exact specifications to achieve the precise, lightweight design and exact fitment. Additionally, a diamond cut manufacturing method holds sprocket teeth to strict diameter and alignment tolerances, ensuring even and smooth operation. Reliable, flush sprocket-to-hub mounting is achieved with countersunk, tapered mounting holes, pairing perfectly with a set of ProX sprocket bolts and lock nuts. These sprockets are also treated with a full coverage coating for added corrosion and wear resistance, plus a factory look. ProX Ultralight steel rear sprockets are available for a wide range of dirt bike applications, including all major Japanese and Austrian brands, and even Beta. Sprockets for each application are offered in a variety of sizes as well to adapt to the varying needs of racers and riders everywhere. These affordable performance sprockets are available through ProX’s vast network of dealers and distributors, as well as direct through their U.S. headquarters. Pair it up with a ProX steel front sprocket and standard MX or X-ring off-road Japanese-made drive chain for a complete, reliabl edrivetrain package. ### About ProX ... ProX Racing Parts supplies performance replacement parts and products which meet or exceed OEM specifications and standards for dirt bikes, ATVs, personal watercraft, snowmobiles, sport bikes and scooters. Founded in 1975 and headquartered near Amsterdam in The Netherlands, ProX is distributed around the globe. ProX specializes in high-quality internal engine components such as pistons, connecting rods, crankshafts and valves, but continues to expand its range and develop product lines for applications outside the engine. ProX stocks over 9,000 part numbers segmented over more than 60 different product groups. For more information, log on to https://www.pro-x.com
    11 points
  17. Just picked her up a couple weeks ago. First photoshoot 🙂
    11 points
  18. 25 will not blow out a tire. 75 might. Sounds to me like just trapped air. Put at least 40-60 psi in it. Are you positive you did not pinch the tube? IE, have the tube very slightly inflated, just enough to give it shape when putting the second bead on. Deflate the tube, squeeze the tire all around, looking between the bead and rim to ensure the tube is not visible, then inflate to pressure.
    11 points
  19. Forest partially open, had to look. Probably lost about 30% of my preferred riding area - which sucks but a lot has survived, though most of it is off the beaten path. Closer to home it is quite burnt. There were a lot of crews about doing repairs. That was good to see. If you did a lot of Elkins or Gold Note riding - well, the news on that is not so good. I am waiting for the closure area to shrink - so I can look some more. Burnt Ridge towards Gold Note: Slug Gulch looking towards Grizzly Flats, can see Rocky Bar Road. Not all has burnt - still good stuff:
    11 points
  20. I can't criticise anyone for having too many bikes.There are currently 11 in my garage(s) & enclosed trailer. Dirt bikes, sport bikes, sport touring bike, touring bikes + a couple of old Harleys (Shovel & Evo).. I still look @ CL for used bikes..I believe it's a sickness.
    11 points
  21. Well after working at the same place for some 44 years, I clocked out for the final time this afternoon, trust me I was doing every bit of that and more in my head as I was driving out the parking lot.... 😀
    11 points
  22. Or how about a motorcyclist? I live in a rural area of NW NJ where there are extremely tight twisty back roads. My bike is no show piece, it gets ridden hard every weekend. Of all the bikes I own, it is the most fun - afterall it's a DRZ.
    11 points
  23. I did the same treatment to mine.
    11 points
  24. For 12K, you're getting a race ready/high performance dirt bike, only 15 years ago the equipment on it considered high end 'exotic' factory race bike only components, now stock OEM. (yet on top of that folks still feel the need to bling with 1K exhaust systems etc.) If you are just recreationally trail riding, a KLX300R is about half the price, plenty capable and, will get you at the same places albeit a bit slower. Get into boating or snowmobiling and you'll realize that dirt biking is still quite a fairly affordable form of motorsport. Using a price index calculator, 12K now is equivalent to 5K back in 1986, around what new MX bikes were selling for back then. You may look at it as prices rising but, it's actually the purchasing power of the US dollar that's constantly getting lower, now even more rapidly diminishing thru printing/creating them out of thin air (Stimulus). Read up on the '1971 Nixon gold standard'.
    10 points
  25. Seems like a small compromise to make if you are pleased with the bike otherwise. To scrap it for a cosmetic reason sounds silly to me.
    10 points
  26. 10 points
  27. That you need to run a quiet pipe to keep the neighborhood Karen’s happy. this teaches the Karen’s they have some sort of authority or say. Do the opposite of what ever the Karen’s ask.
    10 points
  28. 10 points
  29. Whatever you do, be gentle on the rubber seals in each link, and don't use a stiff brush, especially a wire brush. Don't pressure spray water on the chain either as this can force water past the oring or x ring seals that are at the pivot of each link. Basically, the chain is lubricated internally when manufactured, and nothing you spray on the outside makes any difference...other than appearance. It is wear that causes your chain to become "longer", not "stretching" as is commonly thought....and the wear is in the pins where they rotate on the inner links as the chain flexes going around the sprocket. This is why a 14 on the front will wear your chain faster. If you damage the small seals or force water past, then you will really shorten the life of your chain. So. back to gentle washing, soap and water and don't be too fussy. Avoid spraying lube on the outside that will pick up sand etc and hold it, as this will then grind between the links and the sprockets and accelerate the wear on the sprocket.
    10 points
  30. Old pic. Won alot of races on that 09 🔥🔥 set my 04 that have now up exactly the same
    10 points
  31. I just had the best day ever!!! My friend helped me adjust the SAG and the shock absorber before the ride today. I rode as good or better today than I ever have. We rode some tougher stuff and I just didn't feel like I struggled at all. It was just freaking fun. I didn't want to quit riding . And this is how I usually am when I go out riding, I just don't want quit. I FINALLY have the new bike dialed in. It doesn't seem like much, but it took me forever as I'd change one thing at a time and kept breaking things in between.. I put on a throttle tamer, shaved the seat, new front sprocket at 13 teeth, and adjusted the shock. And voila, I now have the perfect bike for me.
    10 points
  32. One minor irritant on the DRZ, is when standing off-road (on the balls of my feet) my heal is always pushing on the kick stand spring. Forcing me to ride a little pigeon toed. So I finally moved the spring inboard by drilling a hole in the kickstand and flipping the spring around. now I just have to cut off the old spring pin and stand switch bracket (pushes the spring out a little). Has taken away that little irritant 😀
    10 points
  33. Private riding area in CA
    10 points
  34. Day 2 - Gary, Stephanie, Ken, Andrew, Tony, and new rider, Paul, and I all took off for an all day ride. First we headed up into the mountains on Coyote trail which took us up a Jeep trail that provided amazing views of the Sierra Mountains and Valley. We reached the top where there was a small lake. The trail was very rocky which made it fun. We took a break, had a snack and took a group picture thanks to another group of riders. After our rest, we took off but lost Tony for a bit. After a few minutes or so we were able to go back and find him. He was flying his drone so he will have some cool videos of his own. We headed through more beautiful meadows. The dirt was perfect due to rain and snow the previous day. After a few hours, it was time to head down so it was a race to get to Big Pine for more BBQ. I made a wrong turn so I had to turn around and get back on the GPS track. While heading down the mountain, we came across shooting area #2 so thanks to Andrew to ensure we did not ride right into the downrange area. We ate at Cooper Top BBQ again, got some gas then headed up to Black Canyon. We had to pave it for a few miles then off to some great single track. Andrew had repair #2 on his skid plate. Near the bottom was a cool valley surrounded by tall rock formations. After a short break there, we took a dirt road then short pavement ride back to the campground. Total ride was about 90 miles. That night was the VCMC dinner banquet where we had a pulled pork dinner, raffle and good company. I won a Rocky Mountain coffee mug and car sun shade and Tony won some grips. After that back to fire pit at the campground. This was definitely the best day I have ever rode. Not the toughest but good trails coupled with the scenery and other cool riders made for a wonderful ride/day. Here is a video of Coyote trail which has several short clips. plus some pictures
    10 points
  35. Some eye candy. Buddy restoring this sent me pics, not quite done yet. Wards old mechanic built the motor on it. Love this era of bikes!
    10 points
  36. I have made a shim stack viewer to help visualize stacks that get posted on the net as numbers. Stack can display shims, piston(-), metal spacer(S), float(F), upward cup(U) and downward cup(D). There is 2 viewable themes to choose from. You can switch ‘Input Type’ to import simple text stacks. This fills the input boxes for further editing. Text processing will only isolate number values. Anything that is between the numbers will be discarded. The sequence must be width, height then count.(count can be omitted for one shim). Sequence types can be changed between 22-0.2(3) or 22.2(3). Note: first type supports whole numbers, the second type is split at the decimal (<1.0 thick). Shims can be shifted up/down with the arrow buttons(not available on touch screens). Title can be changes to describe stack. The height of stack is related to screen height. So if you rotate/zoom your device it will re-scale to suit(after pressing update). Shim_Stack_Viewer Let me know if there is any issues.
    10 points
  37. Take your hammer, and throw it away! I think the $100 cost of a new one is an appropriate fine for that damage. The reason you had to beat it out of the wheel is because of the rust. The reason for the rust is that your seals were toast a long time ago, and you didn't put a light film of grease on the axle last time you had it out. Better check your bearings too - they might be as corroded as the axle. In the future, if you ever have to tap an axle to break it loose, thread the nut onto it first so that you're tapping the nut, not the end of the axle. AND, hold a block of wood against the nut so that you're hitting the block with the hammer - not hammering the nut directly. You earned an "ahhh shit" for this. Now you have to earn at least 5 "attaboys" to redeem yourself.
    10 points
  38. My Dad beat/whipped me for anything he thought didn't fit his requirements - occurred a few times per month. I have raised two daughters now and my Son is 16. Haven't beat either of them. Both Daughter's did so well in school that they practically made money going to university with their scholarships and grants earned. Not sure yet with the Son but he's not using drugs, not drinking, not in jail, hasn't got a girl pregnant and his GPA is 3.8. Daughter 1 has BA degree, a job, car, and an apartment. Daughter 2 is now in graduate school fully funded by the university. The belt is doing just fine solely keeping my pants up.
    10 points
  39. I don't store my shit dirty... Ever... Period.... Some people don't understand the difference between: "Dirt Bike" and "Dirty Bike" Even when I'm done using a chainsaw, it gets the air filter cleaned... chain tightened/ sharpened/ front sprocket greased... Gas and oil topped off... When you need to run saw at my place , you pick one of the 7... Pull the choke on and pull the rope... Ready to go... As ALL equipment should ALWAYS be... Anything else is just lame... Lazy ..
    10 points
  40. I did an experiment one day to try and debunk the whole "don't use a pressure washer" myth. I have a 3300psi gas unit, and I installed the lazer beam nozzle and went to town on all my linkage bearings. Like blasted the sh!t outta them. Removed my linkage after the bike was dry so that I could service the bearings, and they were great inside. The seals do their job, and keep water out. There was nothing but grease inside. I feel those who have issues with rusting, it's because the bike was either submerged in mud for awhile, or their seals were worn out. Don't be afraid to use a pressure washer. It cleans much better than a garden hose.
    10 points
  41. I only wash it when it's covered in mud...otherwise I've gone on multiple rides and never touched it outside of lube the chain... I will generally wash it if I service it too
    10 points
  42. Had 3 good days of riding in Wolverine Michigan ,we rode the "C" loop and the "B" loop each loop is 38 miles of tight and some very nice winding trails that you could get a pretty good rythm going I've got some photos but very few . The first day Nick Sr. fell about 10 miles in and broke some ribs so that ended day one but day 2 Nick Jr and I did a whole day as we did on day 3 as well. The pics of the brewery in Petosky, Mich that we went to and the view from there porch. the rest are of course the trail etc. hopefully more to come. Maybe some video if I can figure out how to post it.
    9 points
  43. Oh boy, you’ve opened a can of worms here. Do what makes you happy. Personally, I thouroghly clean my bike after every ride, and I have my reasons. This thread will turn out like an oil thread.
    9 points
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